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Corvair Cylinder Head Thermal Cleaning

Here's another look at the thermal cleaning system at Costa Mesa R&D Automotive Machine Shop being used to clean a pair of grungy/filthy Corvair cylinder heads. (949) 631-6376 Don't forget to 'Click' and SUBSCRIBE.


 


More Videos...


Fiat 1200 Cylinder Head Rebuild-Take 2
Take 2 on the Fiat 1200 cylinder head rebuild. Spelling mistake corrected. Costa Mesa R&D Auomotive Machine Shop (949) 631-6376 Don't for get to 'Click' and SUBSCRIBE.





Fiat 1200 Cabriolet Cylinder Head Rebuilding
Here are some of the steps that are required to rebuild a cylinder head. Watch as John Edwards takes you thru the process at Costa Mesa R&D Automotive Machine Shop. (949) 631-6376 Don't forget to 'Click' and SUBSCRIBE.





Opel Cylinder Head Resurface and O Ringing
This Opel Kadett cylinder hewad was brought into Costa Mesa R&D Automotive Machine Shop for resurfacing and O-ringing, watch as John Edwards guides you thru the process. (949) 631-6376 Don't forget to 'Click' and SUBSCRIBE!





Replacing a Corvair Head/Cold valve adjustment/compression c
Other info also!





Cylinder Head 204 - Porting & Polishing
This is a first-generation 1992 1.6L Hyundai Elantra small-combustion-chamber head. Thats what it is. It's a J1 engine's cylinder head. In Cylinder Head 106 I talked about the mainstream porting theories as they are discussed. We looked at a cylinder head that I have thousands of dollars of professional work performed on, and a bone-stock second-generation head that I didn't port. In this video I just might do something you haven't seen done before. For some, that may be uncomfortable. The port and polish job I perform here is what I think will work best for my current build. This is not an extreme killer port job. What will be different here is where port textures are concerned, I will be following the advice of a reputable source that will remain un-named. You're free to port yours differently than I do in this video, and I give you that out, around the 20 minute marker. The Hyundai is far from being an ultimate-performance build. It's a $400 box of scraps with nothing but time invested. It's perfect for this video. My finished product WILL be an improvement over what I had. I don't yet have access to a flow bench. I still have an achievement to un-lock. As far as you should be concerned with the techniques I employ... without flow numbers there is no evidence of what this will do, but we will gather lots of info from dynp sessions and drag strip time slips. If I could test it on a flow bench, I would. There are MANY, and when I say many, I mean thousands of flame war mongering pirates floating around on rough seas with a hair trigger cannon finger itching to fire if you port a head any differently than what the herd mentality says to do while porting a cylinder head. I cover the herd mentality because it has merit. It's been tested. Tried and true. But I don't follow it to the letter of the law. I'm definitely not here to de-bunk it. I would port a cylinder head differently for each build based on how that engine was used. There's an extremely valid reason why relating to air speed. It's not the texture of a port that maximizes the effect of fuel atomization, but the velocity of the air running through an x or y sized valve. The driving factor in this is the piston speed. I'm not going to give you the technical information, but will refer you to information about the Lovell factor. There's a better description of this in the links below, and even a calculator to help you find your engine's sweet spot. Why the Lovell factor is important: https://www.highpowermedia.com/blog/3346/the-effect-of-valve-size Lovell gas factor calculator: http://www.rbracing-rsr.com/lovellgascalc.html Only people who have flow testing equipment know for sure what really works and have the capability to produce a perfectly-matched port job for the ultimate performance build. Those guys know the definition of ultimate, and THEY are floating below the water Aegis-class submarines ready to blow your comment up if you don't know what you're talking about. They don't care if you're an armchair mechanic or a herd of pirates. I will say, they're zoomed in pretty close on me right now, and I'm expecting to take a few hits. My work will be tested based on Dyno and drag strip performance, and the results will be posted here. Fortunately, those kinds of videos are a WHOLE LOT EASIER TO MAKE!!!





Cylinder Head 105 - Valve Job Basics
Valves not sealing? Valves not bent? This is how you fix that problem. In this video I outline the basic valve job procedure. Cleaning the valves, cleaning the seats, cleaning the combustion chamber and lapping the valves in to make a better seal. Here I cover the process start-to-finish. It's the same exact process for pretty much all non-rotary combustion engines. It takes patience and perseverance to do this job, but anyone can do it. Reference your service manual for measurements and service limits. Everything else that's not in your service manual is in this video. I apologize for not having broken busted crap to work with in this video. It's more beneficial to all of you when bad fortune falls on me because it gets well documented, and many people watching these videos are looking for answers. If you have bent valves, you will discover it quickly once you chuck one up in the drill. You'll see the face of the valve wobble around while it spins. You'll see evidence of this damage on the valve seat. If it's bad, you may see damage on the valve guides in the form of cracks or missing pieces where the valve guides protrude through the head ports. Give all that stuff a good visual inspection. ...and if you doubt yourself, never hesitate to get a second opinion or consult a machine shop. They will have access to expensive tools that you wont find in your average gearhead's garage.





How To Clean The Carbon From Top Of Pistons | Using Only Household Products
VISIT THE SITE TO SEE ALL PHOTOS AND VIDEOS ON THIS: http://www.mach1restoration.com/how-to-clean-the-carbon-from-top-of-pistons -using-only-household-products/ After pulling the GT40 heads from the 5.0 roller motor I discovered that the tops of the pistons were coated in a thick layer of black carbon buildup. The cylinder walls (bores) were in great shape with no gouges or burrs. This left me with 2 options. Option 1 was to disassemble the entire short block and replace the pistons and parts that were essential after short block disassembly. Or Option 2 was to try and clean these up and freshen up the cylinder walls. I chose option 2. I started by spraying the piston tops with the bathroom cleaner and I let it soak in for about 10 minutes. Next, I took an SOS or Brillo pad and soaked it in rubbing alcohol. I started to scrub and scrub until the carbon began to come off in places. This is a vigorous process that does require some old fashioned elbow grease but in the end the results are well worth it. Once all of the carbon was relatively gone off of the flat areas of the piston I broke out the air grinder with a brass brush for the valve reliefs The air tools are not essential if you want to take a little extra time with a brass bristled hand brush. Whatever you do, only use brass! After all of the carbon was clear I used the steel wool wet with alcohol and wiped down the cylinder bores and made them shine like new again. I gave the pistons a final rinse with alcohol and then vigorously oiled the pistons and the cylinder walls to ensure no surface rust would appear. I also sprayed them down with Ballistol (gun cleaner all natural) Anyone can do this with a little time and patients. Just take your time and you'll love the results!





Cylinder Head 106 - Casting & Porting Tech
Description. No really guys, what can I type here? I just went on for 18 minutes without shutting up. I apologize for deviating from my normal format, but we're almost there... ...when I port a head, there will be no voiceover, and it will be a 200-series video.





911 Cylinder Head Thermal Cleaning





324 Oldsmobile Cracked Cylinder Head Repair
This Oldsmobile 324 Rocket cylinder head has a crack, watch John Edwards as he repairs is at Costa Mesa R&D Automotive Machine. (949) 631-6376 Be sure to "Click" and SUBSCRIBE.





Cylinder Head 203 - Valve & Spring Installation
There are 2 critical values in getting your valvetrain geometry correct. Valve install height and spring install height. On some models of cylinder heads, getting these values is easier than it is on a 4g63 cylinder head. On the first Glyptal video, you heard me complain about the complexity of the casting and how hard it was to reach all the nooks and crannies while applying that coating. The casting is very complex on a 4g63 head. There are hydraulic galleries for the lifters elevated above the valvetrain surface which make accessing each valve bore with precision measurement tools very difficult. It's because of this that you need to do some math to get these values correct. Stuart is going to show you the process for obtaining the stem height and spring height values on a 4g63 head. Using these numbers you can determine other work necessary to correct the spring height value to correct seat pressure, and ensure you have adequate valve travel for your springs to work correctly. It looks like rocket surgery, but really it's pretty simple. The ultimate goal is to get every valve spring in as close proximity to one another as you can, while doing your best to nail the recommended specification PROVIDED BY THE VALVE SPRING MANUFACTURER. Loose valve springs can result in leaky valve seats, valve bounce and deflection that will drastically shorten the life of the valvetrain. If valve bounce is severe, it can cause engine-killing interference with the pistons Tight valve springs can cause excessive valvetrain vibration generated by the force necessary for the camshafts to push them open. On the narrow side of the spectrum this can increase friction on the cams which can wipe lobes and shorten their lifespan, and on the severe end in not only increases the likelihood of wiping a cam lobe, it can lead to binding valve springs and crashing the valvetrain. You have to hit the sweet spot. Valve springs specifications include several variables that help you achieve these goals. The manufacturer rates their springs for their installed pressure and height. They have a compression limit referred to as valve spring bind which tells you how far you can compress them from their installed height before the coils begin to bind and the spring stops compressing. The valve springs used in this video are rated at 97lbs @ 1.440" installed, and .500" lift. This means they should bind at .940", but my cams will only generate .433" lift, giving me plenty of head room at the top (.067") to prevent binding if they are installed correctly. One thing we found which I wasn't expecting is they're a little on the stiff side of spec. We measured 100lbs at 1.452", so rather than risk setting them up too tight, that's where we set our tight specification. This decision was made because if the rated pressure is lower than our actual measurements, this would in theory decrease the lift specification and increase the possibility of binding. Our install pressure ended up still higher than spec with a barely-larger-than-spec spring installed height. I don't consider this a defect. It is close enough within the margin of error that it shouldn't cause any problems, and anyone doing this job right will measure and check all of these specifications to ensure these parts are what they say they are. That's what you watched us do. I'm confident that this will work because the 4g63 utilizes a hydraulic self-adjusting valvetrain. If the stem height is too high, it can be reduced by grinding the ends of the valve stems to shorten them. This will have no affect on spring installed height when the parts are assembled, however; it will change the amount on paper that you'd need to subtract from the stem height in order to accurately calculate spring installed height. If any of the valves have been ground to shorten their stem height, all of the valves should be measured separately with their retainers and keepers assembled, and that new value subtracted from stem height individually to obtain each spring installed height. You can't reduce this value any other way short of replacing the valve seat. If the valve stem height is too low, you can modify the valve seat or machine the valve spring perches (seat or retainer) to increase the size of the spring installed height. Another method would be to cut the valve seat deeper to recess the valve. In my video, we show this whole process on a brand new set of Supertech valves. All of them are identical, and all of the retainers are new and identical. Because of this (and yes we checked it), and because no valves required any grinding, we only needed to use one value in our math for all 16 valves. Hopefully this video clears up the process and covers the options available for making changes if they're necessary. If you land within 3% of spec, you've done your diligence in achieving correct valvetrain geometry.





Starting up 392 Hemi, part 1
The front engine dragster Six Shooter became with 392 Hemi! 392 Hemi is being started for the first time after 10 months building. Homepage: six-shooterracing.com





Glass Beading Cylinder Heads
Anthony @ DIYautotech shows you how effective glass beading can be on CERTAIN TYPES of cylinder heads. Make sure to read the CAUTION part of the video before performing this process. If you have any questions or comments, just leave them below. Don't forget to SUBSCRIBE!





VW CYLINDER HEAD QUESTIONS ANSWERED





Cylinder Head 206 - Valve Clearance (& LSA)
This video is the companion and continuation video for Cylinder Head 205. In Cylinder Head 205 we covered the tools and technique for setting valve timing versus the factory-recommended specifications. It didn't work, thus; this video. How do I know it didn't work? Watch this video. The reason this is a companion video is because anyone changing their valve timing must also CHECK their valve clearance or risk bending valves. If I can install aftermarket cams, then I have made significant changes to my valve clearance. If I move cam gears on an engine that was previously running, then I have made significant changes to my valve clearance. If I have milled my head or block, I have made significant changes to my valve clearance. If I have installed larger valves, I have made significant changes to my valve clearance. Mitsubishi doesn't build a whole lot of wiggle room into their valvetrains. They keep the valves pretty tight to maximize performance and a 4g63 IS an interference engine. Note that if you follow the recommendations in this video and damage your valvetrain that I am not responsible. Here I demonstrate all of the techniques to ensure that damage never occurs because these tests are performed PRIOR to the engine ever starting, and prove that clearance is adequate for THE PARTS I SHOW HERE ON CAMERA. There can be components installed in other rotating assemblies that require additional clearance to be built into your valve clearance such as aluminum rods, or other alloys employed in the casting and forging of rotating assembly parts and valves. I strongly urge you to check with those manufacturers for their recommendations regarding thermal expansion, stretch, bounce rocker gap or float prior to making any adjustments, and use this video only as a documentation of my experience. In other words, it's my opinion. What works in your engine will likely be very different from mine, but the tests and the math shown here will work the same with your build. To find your intake valve clearance... Add your intake valve opening degrees (btdc) to your intake valve closing degrees (abdc) to 180°. IO + IC + 180 = DURATION DURATION ÷ 2 = LOBE CENTERLINE LOBE CENTERLINE - IO = INSTALLED INTAKE CENTERLINE To find your Exhaust valve clearance... Add your Exhaust valve opening degrees (bbdc) to your intake valve closing degrees (atdc) to 180°. EO + EC + 180 = DURATION DURATION ÷ 2 = LOBE CENTERLINE LOBE CENTERLINE - EC = INSTALLED Exhaust CENTERLINE To get your Lobe Separation Angle, ADD your INSTALLED INTAKE CENTERLINE to your INSTALLED Exhaust CENTERLINE and divide that result by 2. Intake Centerline + Exhaust Centerline ÷ 2 = LSA Tight Lobe Separation Angles * MOVE TORQUE LOWER IN THE POWER BAND * INCREASE MAXIMUM TORQUE OUTPUT * INCREASE CYLINDER PRESSURE * INCREASE CRANKING COMPRESSION * INCREASE EFFECTIVE COMPRESSION * INCREASE COMBUSTION CHAMBER SCAVENGING EFFECT * SHORTEN YOUR POWER BAND * REDUCE IDLE VACUUM! * REDUCE IDLE STABILITY * INCREASE LIKELIHOOD OF KNOCK! * INCREASE OVERLAP * DECREASE PISTON TO VALVE CLEARANCE! Wide Lobe Separation Angles * MOVE TORQUE HIGHER IN THE POWER BAND * DECREASE MAXIMUM TORQUE OUTPUT * LENGTHEN YOUR POWER BAND * DECREASE CYLINDER PRESSURE * DECREASE LIKELIHOOD OF KNOCK * DECREASE CRANKING COMPRESSION * DECREASE EFFECTIVE COMPRESSION * INCREASE IDLE VACUUM * IMPROVE IDLE STABILITY * DECREASE OVERLAP * DECREASE COMBUSTION CHAMBER SCAVENGING EFFECT * INCREASE PISTON TO VALVE CLEARANCE There's more that I want to say about Lobe Separation Angle (LSA). If you're tuning a DOHC engine with cam gears, you're very lucky to go through all this trouble. The pushrod and SOHC crowd can't change their lobe separation angles without replacing their camshaft, and on many engines that means removing the cylinder heads. On a 4g63 with adjustable gears, you loosen the lock bolts, turn, lock it back down and you've adjusted your LSA. This is a luxury which if you've never had to build a SOHC or a pushrod engine and install camshafts that you take for granted. DOHC tuning permits the ability to alter the opening and closing events of the valves independently of one another and perfect the valve timing during tuning without having to completely remove and replace the valvetrain. What this also means is that the pushrod crowd needs to know and understand a lot more about their camshaft profiles prior to making their purchase as we [the DOHC crowd] do. They have to be on their A-game when they drop the coin on a new cam or else things get expensive really quick. Lobe separation angle says more about how camshafts behave than duration and lift, but all 3 should be carefully scrutinized when you're making that determination. Yes, I did actually animate my engine's valve timing exactly the way HKS said to set it up. Yes those are all actual photos of my parts. Yes that was the biggest Photoshop file I've ever created.





Which car is faster? Which Car is Faster?




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