Mitsubishi Outlander Sport


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MotorWeek Car Keys: 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport
MotorWeek Car Keys: 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport





2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport
This is the new 2011 Outlander Sport from Mitsubishi. It looks allot like the current Outlander ,but with a few changes. Its smaller(over 12inches shorter) and less in price. The front end is the same as the current 2010 Outlander but it's more blunt and muscular than its big brother Outlander. I like the front end on this Outlander more than the regular one. The regular Outlander is longer and pointed. The sport version is short and stubby.





2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport
2011 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport Produced by Medium Monster http://mediummonster.com Directed by Will Roegge http://willroegge.com For Mitsubishi Motors North America http://www.mitsubishicars.com





2011 Mitsubishi ASX / RVR / Outlander Sport EuroNCAP Crash Tests (Frontal, Side, & Pole Impacts)
Adult occupant The passenger compartment of the ASX remained stable in the frontal impact with only slight rearward deformation of the windscreen pillar. Dummy readings showed good protection of the knees and femurs of both front seat occupants. Mitsubishi showed that occupants of different sizes and those sat in different positions would be similarly well protected. Protection of the driver's feet and ankles was rated as marginal. Maximum points were scored in the side barrier impact, with good protection of all body areas. However, in the more severe side pole test, protection of the chest area was weak. Protection against whiplash injuries in the event of a rear-end collision was rated as marginal. Child occupant In the frontal impact, the head of the 3 year dummy, sat in a forward-facing restraint, was well controlled. In the side barrier test, both the 3 year and the 18month dummies were properly contained by the protective shells of their restraints. The front passenger airbag can be disabled to allow a rearward facing child restraint to be used in that seating position. However, information provided to the driver regarding the status of the airbag is not clear. The dangers of using a rearward facing restraint in that seating position without first disabling the airbag are clearly explained in a permanently attached label.




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