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BMW i8 review - the new king of supercars?
The BMW i8 is a game-changing hybrid super car that makes the Audi R8 and Porsche 911 feel and look dated. Read the full review: http://bit.ly/1o38PDU Subscribe to our YouTube channel http://bit.ly/11Ad1j1 Subscribe to the mag http://subscribe.autoexpress.co.uk/yt The BMW i8 can trace its roots back to the Vision Efficient Dynamics Concept from the 2009 Frankfurt Motor Show. After four years of technical workshops and concepts, BMW confirmed it would build that car and five years later, it arrived in the form of the i8. The design of the BMW i8 is absolutely incredible and it's a surprise to see how much of the concept's design that the BMW has managed to keep. There's a really nice cut-out in the bonnet which comes in a contrasting colour to the body and at the back, there are a pair of elegant flying C-Pillars. The most striking feature of the BMW i8 however, is its upward opening scissor doors. The BMW i8 is powered by three power-sources. A 129bhp engine driving the front wheels, a 227bhp three-cylinder driving the rears, and another small Boosting electric motor, which works as a generator. The BMW i8 also has a huge battery pack, which allows for 22 miles of range. Surprisingly though, the BMW i8 still weighs 70kg less than an Audi R8, which comes as a result of its high-tech carbon fibre body and aluminium chassis. It can also hit 0-62mph in 4.4-seconds. Driving on the electric motor, the BMW i8 feels Volkswagen Golf GTI fast, but if you put your foot down while going up a hill, the three-cylinder kicks in. It sounds really good - pretty similar to the throaty six-cylinder in the Porsche 911. To make the BMW i8 come fully alive, though, you need to put it in 'Sport' mode. This keeps the turbocharged three-cylinder engine running, as well as the electric motors. It basically gives you everything that this car has got. The engine sounds even better, and because you've got the electric motor giving you that instant shove, it feels fast. As soon as it starts to get a bit inefficient, the engine kicks in. You might expect a surging, stepped acceleration from the BMW i8, but it's really smooth. These figures are better than a Toyota Prius, a Yaris Hybrid and almost any other eco car you can think of. The BMW i8 is really nice to drive, and what you notice more than anything else, is that it feels really light on its feet. All that carbon fibre really seems to have done the trick. If you're expecting the BMW i8 to be an M Car, then don't. It's not a big oversteering brute, it's much more clinical than that and gets a character all of its own. The steering on the BMW i8 is really nice and light, plus you get a really crisp turn-in. When the back tyres are starting to lose traction, the fronts will come in and drag you out thanks to its four-wheel drive system. It's really forgiving, but not quite as sharp as a 911 maybe. However, it's different and it's something immensely likeable. The BMW i8 comes with a £100,000 price-tag - similar to a Porsche 911 or an Audi R8 - but what's amazing is how much tech you get for that. Obviously there's the carbon-fibre body, three power-trains and four-wheel drive, but there are even options such as laser headlamps. The BMW i8 makes the Audi R8 and 911 feel a bit old, but the Porsche is still sharper. What's clear though, is that BMW has definitely done enough to keep Audi and all other sports car manufacturers on their toes.





Stalking hot girls in a Renault Twizy - Auto Express
Apologies for the re-upload - now in high def! We take the funky two-seat Renault Twizy electric car for a test drive around the streets of London. Read more: http://www.autoexpress.co.uk/carreviews/firstdrives/282595/renault_twizy.ht ml Subscribe to Auto Express magazine and get 6 issues for £1 plus a free gift: http://subscribe.autoexpress.co.uk/yt The Renault Twizy has split opinion with its stripped-back interior and pod-like styling, but one thing's for sure: it's unique. So far, we've only driven it on smooth tarmac in Ibiza, but now it's time for its real test -- on potholed city roads in the UK. Our test car is a top-spec Technic model, which adds 'luxuries' such as 13-inch alloys and carbon-look plastic on the roof and dash. The scissor doors are an extra £545, but are a must- have option for keeping your feet dry. Whichever way you look at it, this is a back-to-basics machine.





Hyundai i10 Review - Auto Express
Hyundai i10 review: http://bit.ly/HoKCZg Subscribe to our YouTube channel http://bit.ly/11Ad1j1 Subscribe to the mag http://subscribe.autoexpress.co.uk/yt The Hyundai i10 is the company's third attempt at a small city carto rival the likes of the Volkswagen up!, Skoda Citigo and Toyota Aygo. This one's bigger than ever before, but it's still a great city car - and it's posher than ever, too. This all-new Hyundai i10 is more practical than ever, with lots of door space for big water bottles, a big glovebox and storage in the centre console as well. Four adults will fit in the car too, and the boot is the biggest in the class - a whole one litre more than the VW up!. The old i10 was quite noisy but this new one really impressive when it comes to refinement. Extra seals on the doors and on the bulkhead behind the dash mean it's really isolated from wind and engine noise when you're inside the car. The ride is quite soft, too, so there's a little bit of body roll, but the supportive seats mean it's still comfortable when going round a fast corner. It rides so well it could be mistaken for a larger car, and not just somethign like a Ford Fiesta - maybe even a class above that. So despite being a lot more refined, it's nice that the i10 is still quite good fun to drive. It's not often you find a small car like this that has a tight turning circle and city driving credentials that also has a good amount of steering feel. Thanks to disc brakes front and back the stopping power is good too, and it really imspires confidence in the i10. The steering wheel, the plastic on these switches, gearknob and handbrake all feel nice and posh, but everything else is made from quite hard plastic. It's a clever use of materials because you don't actually notice the bad bits when you're driving the i10. The colour schemes available for the interior are a big part of that too - they are eye-catching and you can choose between four different colours that match the exterior paintwork. So not only is the best i10 Hyundai has ever made, it might just be Hyundai's best ever car. Plus, it's the first of 22 new Hyundai models coming the next four years, so other manufactuers ought to be worried.





Volkswagen XL1 review - Auto Express
Volkswagen XL1 review: http://bit.ly/19eyfWr Subscribe to our YouTube channel http://bit.ly/11Ad1j1 Subscribe to the mag http://subscribe.autoexpress.co.uk/yt After nearly ten years in the making, the Volkswagen XL1 has arrived, and we were lucky enough to drive one in this video review. Volkswagen had one thing in mind with the XL1 - to create a useable, everyday vehicle that would use just a single litre of fuel for every hundred kilometres it travelled. Three concept cars and thirteen years of development later, the Volkswagen XL1 has now become a production reality. It boasts a stylish teardrop design, shaped by aerodynamics to create as little drag as possible. It sits just over a metre tall, which is lower than most sports cars, including a Porsche Boxster. When the XL1 finally arrives in the UK, only around 20-30 cars will be on offer, with early estimates of the price tag coming in at around £100,000. Volkswagen claim the car can achieve 313mpg, so to put this to the test, we drove the XL1 around a short loop in full electric mode. Astonishingly, we managed to achieve 403mpg - so it actually beat the figures stated by Volkswagen. Okay, so, when we did drive the XL1 a little faster, that figure did fall to 196mpg. But it's still efficient, and hardly going to break the bank. Overall, we were pretty impressed with the XL1 - the build quality of the interior was stunning, and it was hard not to be seduced by the cutting-edge technology on board. Don't worry, though; it's going to be a while before the next Volkswagen Golf looks like an XL1.




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