4g63 Balance Shaft Elimination - bearing modification

This is the first part of a two part series about balance shaft elimination on 4g series engines. This video details the bearings, the other video will cover the front case modifications. I've already got a low-def video of the front case mods, and I plan to re-shoot that one in HD when I'm in the assembly phase. It's linked in the video. The balance shafts are designed to cancel out harmonic vibrations caused by combustion and the spinning rotating assembly. They may offer a greater degree of comfort to the driver and passengers, but with that comfort comes a price. Often, when a 4g63 timing belt gives up, it's because the balance shaft belt breaks or comes loose and takes the timing belt out with it. When that happens, it can total your pistons, valves, damage the crankshaft, wrist pins, timing belt tensioner and crank angle sensor. Basically, it can total your motor. The balance shafts also have a combined weigh over 10 lbs and both are driven off the timing belt making them additional and heavy rotating mass. If you've got a lightweight flywheel but still have balance shafts, you have your priorities mixed up. So here's what you do with the bearings. It's easy. You can do this at home. You CAN do it with the motor in the car, BUT DON'T. You must enjoy punishment to do this like that. The end result will slightly increase your oil pressure, but usually not enough to cause concern unless you have a full-circumference bearing turbo, ball bearing turbo--with your oil feed coming off the oil filter housing. The head feed would be better in that case because it's regulated at 15 PSI.

More Videos...

6&7-Bolt 4g63 Front Case & Oil Pump Rebuild
Here we disassemble, clean, inspect and rebuild both popular 4g63 front cases. This is not difficult, you just need to know what to look for. Something else that happens in this video is the analysis of one of the factors that caused my 7-bolt engine to fail. It wasn't the only cause, and we'll talk about that later, but left to its own devices and without the other contributing factors, it would have been the only cause.

4g63 Block Oil Gallery Mod
This modification is intended to improve your 4g series engine's oil delivery. People frequently discover large chunks of flash in their engine's main oil gallery. It's because the galleries are part of the cast, they're not machined into the block. There is also a very rough sharp edge where the main oil gallery is bored into the block, and oil must make a slightly greater-than 90┬░ turn in order to begin its course to the parts it lubricates. Both of these conditions cause turbulence in the oil flow. My goal in this video is to eliminate as much of that as I can. This is a cheap and easy modification if you have the tools, and the patience. Any engine with cast-in oil galleries could probably benefit from this. Be careful not to cut into the high pressure oil gallery or else you will circulate un-filtered oil to the #1 main, oil pump, and rear balance shaft. You will also deprive the rest of the engine the oil pressure it needs to operate. So in short, punch a hole in that and it's trash. I did this my way, everyone may choose to do this a different way. I just wanted to make this video to raise awareness. Also, there's a great thread on DSMtuners about this. Pictures and everything. Written by a machinist and friend of the DSM community. Go give him some reps because he's posted a lot of great info about the DSM oil system over the years. http://www.dsmtuners.com/forums/articles-engine-fuel/452546-4g63-block-oili ng-mod.html

4g63 front case/ balance shaft elim. install Pt. 2
sorry for the noise from my camera, and any confusion. this is my install of both new front case and blanance shaft elimination kit on my 91 talon, this is how i did it. its just a guide do it at your own risk and way, PARTS: AVALIABLE AT FFWDCONNECTION . COM

New Year's Eve Hyundai Teardown
It goes like this. One of the best friends I've ever had built this car from junk parts. He said it best, "it was built from literally a box of scraps". It ran an 13.2 in the quarter mile using no aftermarket performance parts of any kind. That quarter mile time was limited by traction. I know this car had more in it, but I never managed to get it to stick before encountering this. More on this build... The proper bolts were not always available, but the builder knows isht from Shinola. Even though this engine defies all engineering logic from Mitsubishi, the builder knew what would work and what would not. Budget was of the most primary of his concerns, and it shows at every turn, and it's what brought us to the kind of failure we find in this video. I asked him what bearings he used. He said, "...the least expensive ones I could find. Picture Aluglides. Now picture generic Aluglides. I paid half-as-much for those bearings as I would for generic Aluglides. Bolt too long? Put a nut on it and shorten it. Oil pan too close to the pickup? Hammer a big dent in it to make clearance for it. Wrong water pipe? Put a brass hardware store tee in the line to tap a turbo coolant feed. Forget buying ARP's, this is an all-standard re-used factory fastenere'd no-oil-squirter .030"-overbore 6-bolt with the cut-off balance shaft mod. It's using a small combustion chamber head off of a 1.6L Mirage with a 2.0L non-turbo block. The plug wires are used. The radiator hoses were used. Everything but the head gasket came from a junk car. The FWD turbo gearbox is from my 150,000 mile old Plymouth Laser that donated the block to the Colt. This is one of the most amusing cars I've ever wrapped my fingers around because of these kinds of character-building attributes. Nevermind that the chassis has less than 70,000 miles on it (not bad for a '92), it's just that it's built without using any new parts. Parts were substituted when they were not available, and it's ridiculously powerful. Thank you Jamie. You discovered your answer. I'm happy to help. I'll be changing some things like the oil pan bolts, bearing quality, some of the plumbing and fixing a few wiring harness problems, but I'm not changing anything else if I can avoid it. This car was never intended to have anything upgraded to deliver raw power, and I'll do my best to keep it that way, replacing and restoring what failed so that we can keep pushing these generic non-turbo .030" over pistons to the limit. Apparently, 24 PSI from a 14b is not enough. In the meantime, my diagnosis is that excessive oil pressure lead to the breakdown of the #1 bearing. After all, it's the 1st bearing in-line in the oil system on the main gallery. It's the most isolated from clutch harmonics, yet it was the one that spun. The #1 bearing supplies the oil pump. The teardrop on the head is nearly gone from head resurfacing, and this is a no-balance-shaft no-oil-squirter block. I think high oil pressure is why it falls on its face above 6000 rpms. There's a restriction upstream from the lifters and they deflate at high RPMs, losing lift. I'll fix it. I've got the parts.