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4g63 Balance Shaft Elimination - bearing modification

This is the first part of a two part series about balance shaft elimination on 4g series engines. This video details the bearings, the other video will cover the front case modifications. I've already got a low-def video of the front case mods, and I plan to re-shoot that one in HD when I'm in the assembly phase. It's linked in the video. The balance shafts are designed to cancel out harmonic vibrations caused by combustion and the spinning rotating assembly. They may offer a greater degree of comfort to the driver and passengers, but with that comfort comes a price. Often, when a 4g63 timing belt gives up, it's because the balance shaft belt breaks or comes loose and takes the timing belt out with it. When that happens, it can total your pistons, valves, damage the crankshaft, wrist pins, timing belt tensioner and crank angle sensor. Basically, it can total your motor. The balance shafts also have a combined weigh over 10 lbs and both are driven off the timing belt making them additional and heavy rotating mass. If you've got a lightweight flywheel but still have balance shafts, you have your priorities mixed up. So here's what you do with the bearings. It's easy. You can do this at home. You CAN do it with the motor in the car, BUT DON'T. You must enjoy punishment to do this like that. The end result will slightly increase your oil pressure, but usually not enough to cause concern unless you have a full-circumference bearing turbo, ball bearing turbo--with your oil feed coming off the oil filter housing. The head feed would be better in that case because it's regulated at 15 PSI.


 


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4g63 Block Oil Gallery Mod
This modification is intended to improve your 4g series engine's oil delivery. People frequently discover large chunks of flash in their engine's main oil gallery. It's because the galleries are part of the cast, they're not machined into the block. There is also a very rough sharp edge where the main oil gallery is bored into the block, and oil must make a slightly greater-than 90° turn in order to begin its course to the parts it lubricates. Both of these conditions cause turbulence in the oil flow. My goal in this video is to eliminate as much of that as I can. This is a cheap and easy modification if you have the tools, and the patience. Any engine with cast-in oil galleries could probably benefit from this. Be careful not to cut into the high pressure oil gallery or else you will circulate un-filtered oil to the #1 main, oil pump, and rear balance shaft. You will also deprive the rest of the engine the oil pressure it needs to operate. So in short, punch a hole in that and it's trash. I did this my way, everyone may choose to do this a different way. I just wanted to make this video to raise awareness. Also, there's a great thread on DSMtuners about this. Pictures and everything. Written by a machinist and friend of the DSM community. Go give him some reps because he's posted a lot of great info about the DSM oil system over the years. http://www.dsmtuners.com/forums/articles-engine-fuel/452546-4g63-block-oili ng-mod.html





Cylinder Head 204 - Porting & Polishing
This is a first-generation 1992 1.6L Hyundai Elantra small-combustion-chamber head. Thats what it is. It's a J1 engine's cylinder head. In Cylinder Head 106 I talked about the mainstream porting theories as they are discussed. We looked at a cylinder head that I have thousands of dollars of professional work performed on, and a bone-stock second-generation head that I didn't port. In this video I just might do something you haven't seen done before. For some, that may be uncomfortable. The port and polish job I perform here is what I think will work best for my current build. This is not an extreme killer port job. What will be different here is where port textures are concerned, I will be following the advice of a reputable source that will remain un-named. You're free to port yours differently than I do in this video, and I give you that out, around the 20 minute marker. The Hyundai is far from being an ultimate-performance build. It's a $400 box of scraps with nothing but time invested. It's perfect for this video. My finished product WILL be an improvement over what I had. I don't yet have access to a flow bench. I still have an achievement to un-lock. As far as you should be concerned with the techniques I employ... without flow numbers there is no evidence of what this will do, but we will gather lots of info from dynp sessions and drag strip time slips. If I could test it on a flow bench, I would. There are MANY, and when I say many, I mean thousands of flame war mongering pirates floating around on rough seas with a hair trigger cannon finger itching to fire if you port a head any differently than what the herd mentality says to do while porting a cylinder head. I cover the herd mentality because it has merit. It's been tested. Tried and true. But I don't follow it to the letter of the law. I'm definitely not here to de-bunk it. I would port a cylinder head differently for each build based on how that engine was used. There's an extremely valid reason why relating to air speed. It's not the texture of a port that maximizes the effect of fuel atomization, but the velocity of the air running through an x or y sized valve. The driving factor in this is the piston speed. I'm not going to give you the technical information, but will refer you to information about the Lovell factor. There's a better description of this in the links below, and even a calculator to help you find your engine's sweet spot. Why the Lovell factor is important: https://www.highpowermedia.com/blog/3346/the-effect-of-valve-size Lovell gas factor calculator: http://www.rbracing-rsr.com/lovellgascalc.html Only people who have flow testing equipment know for sure what really works and have the capability to produce a perfectly-matched port job for the ultimate performance build. Those guys know the definition of ultimate, and THEY are floating below the water Aegis-class submarines ready to blow your comment up if you don't know what you're talking about. They don't care if you're an armchair mechanic or a herd of pirates. I will say, they're zoomed in pretty close on me right now, and I'm expecting to take a few hits. My work will be tested based on Dyno and drag strip performance, and the results will be posted here. Fortunately, those kinds of videos are a WHOLE LOT EASIER TO MAKE!!!





6&7-Bolt 4g63 Front Case & Oil Pump Rebuild
Here we disassemble, clean, inspect and rebuild both popular 4g63 front cases. This is not difficult, you just need to know what to look for. Something else that happens in this video is the analysis of one of the factors that caused my 7-bolt engine to fail. It wasn't the only cause, and we'll talk about that later, but left to its own devices and without the other contributing factors, it would have been the only cause.





How to port and polish a turbo exhaust housing
I'll fill this in later. The "book" I typed in this field before didn't save. Come back later if you want to read more about the theories behind porting and polishing.





Hyundai Elantra 4g63 Shortblock Assembly
HOLD ON TIGHT! HERE WE GO! We begin the blueprint and assembly on my 1992 Hyundai Elantra's bastardized 4g63. The parts used in this are from a mash of different brands and models outside of the typical 2.0L 4g63, but the specs and standards I am following for its assembly are for the 2.0L DOHC. If you want to follow along in your service manual to verify what I've done here in this video, the processes we cover here detail pages 11C-95 through 11C-105 of the 1g Overhaul manual. I would prefer you not rip them from the binding and throw them away, relying only on this video for instruction... but rather use this video as a motivational guide, and as a demonstration of the techniques involved in those sections. You gotta do the cooking by the book. I never had any intention of making instructional videos on this particular car, but after it blew up I slowly realized it's actually a better case study for how a 4g63 ticks than anything else in my driveway. There are several reasons for this. One being that it's a mix of parts that shouldn't be bolted together, and the other is that many of you watching my videos aren't trying to build a 600hp engine out of aftermarket parts. You're trying to put back together what used to be your daily driver. This car covers those bases. Don't think for a second I won't go through this same trouble and level of detail for the GSX. I will. When I do, having this information in this video will give you a better understanding on how and why I do things the way I do when I get there. This was the shortest I could condense this video. I've never uploaded a video this long, and I hope I never have to do it again. It took a month to create on cutting-edge equipment, 16 hours to export, and 9 hours for YouTube to process. My script for the voiceover is 6 times longer than the whole script for the movie Pootie Tang. 6 times. Longer. Than a Hollywood movie.





Cylinder Head 103 - Deck Tech
How to clean, inspect, and determine what you can do with your cylinder head. Also how WHAT you do affects your oil system. There are many variables at play when you make changes to your cylinder head deck from your oil system, compression ratio, your valve timing and potentially even disaster. 'best not to go that far with it. Watch this video and avoid it if you're building your own 4g63 head. The differences between this head and a 1g head are mostly related to port sizes on the intake and Exhaust, and different sized head bolt holes. The 7-bolt uses an 11mm bolt, and a 6-bolt uses 12mm. 1g heads have gigantic intake ports, but aside from that, valve geometry, oil system functionality and the service limits are all the same. Also, click these links for in-depth discussions about oil port modifications for all generations of Mitsubishis, and specifically for 2g head installations on a 1g block. 4g63 Oil Port Modification: http://www.dsmtuners.com/forums/newbie-forum/341028-4g63t-head-oil-port-mod .html 2nd gen head on a 6-bolt block: http://www.dsmtuners.com/forums/cylinder-head-short-block/341885-oil-port-m od-2-4g63t-2.html Possibly 2 of the best threads on 'Tuners for anyone considering a 1g-in-a-2g or for anyone that wants to know everything about a DSM oil system.





Porsche 911 w/ 4g63 swap 650HP test launch
Check out this unique 650HP Porsche with the heart of a Mitsubishi 4g63 turbocharged engine!!!!!! Wait till the end to see the sick test launch





三菱 ランサーエボリューション4G63エンジン モンスタースポーツ コンプリートエンジン【MX350】作業解説 [MONSTER SPORT MITSUBISHI EVO TUNED Eg]
http://item.rakuten.co.jp/tajimastore/c/0000000162/ http://www.monster-sport.com/product/parts/complete_eng/ http://www.monster-sport.com/e/car/evo10.html 三菱のスポーツエンジン4G63を、多くのモータースポー 用エンジンに携わり、エンジンの研究・実験により得 ノウハウと、高度に標準化した品質管理と工程管理の でコンプリートエンジン化しました。





Hyundai 4g63 Assembly Part 2
Continued progress on the Hyundai build. I've covered most of this before in detail, so I'll save you the fancy narrative. The torque settings are in both the info below, and the video shown on the wrench. You will see this process again here, and each time new aspects of assembly tools and materials will be used. SPECIAL THANKS TO ROJODELCHOCOLATE for the audio track. Oil Pan Bolts 18 7 M6 x12 5'lbs MD012109 2 7 M6 x8 5'lbs MD167134 (some cars use 10mm shorties but 8mm will work) 1g Front Case Bolts qty/GR/DIA/length/torque/part# 4 7 M8 x20 17'lbs MF140225 1 7 M8 x25 17'lbs MF140227 1 7 M8 x40 17'lbs MF140233 1 4 M10 x30 22'lbs MF140062 (6-bolt) 1 7 M8 x40 17'lbs MF140233 (7-bolt) 1g oil pump housing bolts 5 4 M8 x20 12'lbs MF140025 (4qty for 7-bolt and add 1 MD141302 screw) 1 10 M8 x16 27'lbs MD040758 (Balance/Stub shaft bolt) Oil Pump Sprocket Nut 1 11 M10 x 40'lbs MD095237 *use Loctite 1g oil filter housing bolts (that I used w/6-bolt water-cooled OFH) 2 7 M8 x40 14'lbs MF241261 1 7 M8 x20 14'lbs MF140225 1 7 M8 x55 14'lbs MF241264 1 7 M8 x65 14'lbs MF241266 1g Rear Main Seal Housing Bolts 5 7 M6 x16 10'lbs MF140205 (6-bolt) 5 7 M6 x14 10'lbs MF140204 (7-bolt) 1g Timing Tesnsioner Bolts 2 7 M8 x51 17'lbs MD129350 (6-bolt) 2 7 M8 x55 17'lbs MD190987 (7-bolt) 1g Timing Tensioner Arm Bolt 1 8 M8 x16 16'lbs MF241251 Bolt 1 x x x x MD129421 Washer Flywheel bolts 6 11 M12 x22.5 98'lbs MD040557* (ALL Manual transmission 6-bolt cars) 7 11 M12 x21.5 98'lbs MD302074 (ALL Manual transmission 7-bolt turbos) * Part substitution # 2795A956 Crank Sprocket Bolt & Washer 1 11 M14 x40 87'LBS MD074255 CRANKSHAFT CENTER BOLT 1 x M14 x14.5 MD012455 CRANKSHAFT WASHER For gasket, seal and service parts information, please refer to my 6-bolt 4g63 shortblock rebuild parts video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ofWnFXkix3w For timing belt service parts information and tools, please refer to my 4g63 Timing Belt Parts video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BN7TOVrkUNQ In 29 and 3/4 minutes I offer a detailed explanation of how to do a 6-bolt AND 7-Bolt 4g63 Front Case & Oil Pump Rebuild: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DPhyazI1fYc For 33 minutes I cover every oil filter housing including servicing information, rebuilding, modifying the oil filter housing, and the unabridged description of how oil pressure works in my 4g63 Oil Filter Housings video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X88tw1UFs_M





Cylinder Head 201 - Radius Cut Valve Job
This video covers the complete valve job process that your machinist might perform. If the 100 series videos didn't help you identify and correct a problem with your cylinder head, then this is the next step. This video is brought to you with permission from my machinist in full 1080HD, and covers cleaning up the head inside and out, preparation and setting up a radius cutter, cutting all 16 valve seats, valve grinding, and spans 3.5 hours of actual work in under 30 minutes. There's nothing like this anywhere else on YouTube. THANK YOU BALLOS PRECISION MACHINE. Thank you for the professional explanation and execution of a job excellently-done, and un-precedented access to your facilities. A valve job is done by re-grinding or replacing valves, and then having new seats cut to match the faces of the valves you're using. There are several different machines that might be utilized to achieve this result, but the process is the same no matter how it's done. There are seat cutters that utilize cutting stones. There are valve seat cutters with 3 separate angles installed 120° out-of-phase, and there are single cutters with all 3 angles (radius cutter) that cut with one blade in one pass. The machine demonstrated here is a Sunnen VGS-20 Radius Cutter. This machine (now out of production) produces a gradual curved seat that's superior to the shape of a traditional 3-angle seat. While a radius cutter does contain the 30, 45 and 60 degree angles, it does so without leaving any sharp edges between their faces. My valve selection includes Supertech 1mm oversized nitride-coated stainless steel undercut and back-cut intake valves, and 1mm oversized Inconel back-cut Exhaust valves. Inconel is a high-temperature alloy utilized in marine and forced-induction performance engines that can handle more abuse than steel can without melting. The other characteristics of the valves which are discussed typically yield bigger gains in airflow than simply using a bigger hole and a bigger valve. Why I did this to a perfectly-good cylinder head: I changed cams. Because the valves were previously recessed during another valve job 9 years ago, my valve installed height was increased and this raised the operating positions of my rocker arms. My new camshaft selection dictates using the stock valve install height. The only solutions to this valve install height problem are to either replace the valve seats, or install oversized valves. I opted for the latter.





Porting an eBay 20g turbocharger
The price of this turbo will make it a popular purchase, so I figured I'd air out some tech about ways to improve it. This thing is not for everybody. I wouldn't feel comfortable bolting it on my car the way it comes out of the box. I could complain about its flaws except that so far absolutely none of them have been a deal-breaker for me. To me it's like an empty canvas. I promise to eat those words if it happens, and share my poop. Usually I can easily correct these flaws myself and so can you. BUT! If this thing turns out to perform well with what I do to it... It could easily be a cheap, quick ticket to an 11-second car. Something you could do with a free running 1g, a hacksaw, and about $500 worth of fuel upgrades. Yeah, that would be ridiculous, and I'm bolting it onto a well-modified car... But that being possible speaks volumes for what a DSM can really do. This is no big deal to me. I'd rather guinea pig my car for you in HD so you guys can decide whether or not you'd spend your money on this. Really it's an experiment because this isn't my daily-driver, and it contributes to building a better Colt. Tools I used involve: Scratch awl Milwaukee model ???? 1/4" straight-shaft electric DIY grinder Cone and ball-shaped double-cut burs 180 grit high-speed flap wheel Dremel with a flex-shaft and a tiny 320-grit flap wheel a zip tie 10mm combination wrench tiny flat-blade screwdriver (00) for the e-clip on the wastegate compressed air





Blueprint 108 - inspect the deck
There's a reason why there are no subtitled specifications in this video for the block. It's because they don't exist in either service manual, 1g or 2g. You're not supposed to remove material from a block on the deck surface because it has ill effects on parts of the combustion chamber geometry, and alters your compression ratio. It can be done intentionally in some cases for a desired side-affect, but if you have to deck a 4g63 head, it would be advised to use a thicker head gasket. The Mitsubishi Multi-Layered-Steel or MLS gasket is slightly thicker than the OEM composite gasket. Also, HKS, Power Enterprise, Cometic, and other performance brands all make MLS gaskets that are .065 and thicker. THERE IS ONE ERROR IN THE VIDEO. I said a block with .002" warpage is junk. I was completely and totally wrong. While I don't wish to spread misinformation, I don't think it's a big enough error to warrant re-editing this video. I just wasn't paying attention. .002" warpage on a cylinder head is the service limit before it needs machining. I meant to say .02"... or two HUNDREDTHS (not thousandths) of an inch. ...and here's my justification... A warped block to me is junk either way even if its minimal because your MLS gasket will never seal unless both the head and the block are perfectly flat. Trust your machine shop to get the values for how much is taken off, and buy the correct thickness gasket for your machine work. A factory head gasket (composite) is .051" The MLS Mitsubishi gasket is available in the stock .051 and a .062" Cometic makes gaskets up to .072" There are some brands that go as high as .127", but I'd have thrown both the block and head away long before then.





Driveshaft 103 - Replacing carrier bearings
This is the easy stage of the job. Pulling and replacing carrier bearings is actually fun, too. You get to rip them to pieces with little risk of personal injury. If they've been rattling your teeth out for a while, you're going to enjoy getting even with them. So many people are scared of the Lobro joint, but I assure you, unless you couldn't build anything out of Lego's as a child, you're not going to have any trouble with it. It's an amazingly simple part held in with 6 bolts, a clamp, and a snap ring. If it comes apart, so long as you know where everything goes, it will go back together. Don't worry. This video shows you how to replace carrier bearings whether your Lobro joint is healthy or not.





Trans & Clutch 4 - Installing The Clutch
What you wanted to know about clutches but were afraid to ask. I'm putting a ACT MB1-XTSS on the car in this video. Step height, clutch dowell pins, bolt part numbers, alignment and various clutch parts are described in this video. It's part of an all-inclusive drivetrain tech piece I'm working on that's broken up into sections to maintain focus on the individual processes involved.





Boost Leak Testing 202: Hair Spray 1080HD
Why do I know about this? I'm tired of being the one knowing all the weird crap. If everyone knows it, it won't be weird anymore. It will be commonplace. By the time I'm done sealing up all of my own Boost leaks, all of you will also be experts as well. I'm sure most of you would teach me something, too... but you subscribed, so here it comes... something I learned in my travels... Also, thanks Ilya M. I've only heard about it twice in my life. It worked great for the one time I've ever needed it, and I'm a huge fan.




Which car is faster? Which Car is Faster?





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