Drag Racing 1/4 Mile times 0-60 Dyno Fast Cars Muscle Cars

4g63 Balance Shaft Elimination - bearing modification

This is the first part of a two part series about balance shaft elimination on 4g series engines. This video details the bearings, the other video will cover the front case modifications. I've already got a low-def video of the front case mods, and I plan to re-shoot that one in HD when I'm in the assembly phase. It's linked in the video. The balance shafts are designed to cancel out harmonic vibrations caused by combustion and the spinning rotating assembly. They may offer a greater degree of comfort to the driver and passengers, but with that comfort comes a price. Often, when a 4g63 timing belt gives up, it's because the balance shaft belt breaks or comes loose and takes the timing belt out with it. When that happens, it can total your pistons, valves, damage the crankshaft, wrist pins, timing belt tensioner and crank angle sensor. Basically, it can total your motor. The balance shafts also have a combined weigh over 10 lbs and both are driven off the timing belt making them additional and heavy rotating mass. If you've got a lightweight flywheel but still have balance shafts, you have your priorities mixed up. So here's what you do with the bearings. It's easy. You can do this at home. You CAN do it with the motor in the car, BUT DON'T. You must enjoy punishment to do this like that. The end result will slightly increase your oil pressure, but usually not enough to cause concern unless you have a full-circumference bearing turbo, ball bearing turbo--with your oil feed coming off the oil filter housing. The head feed would be better in that case because it's regulated at 15 PSI.


 


More Videos...


6&7-Bolt 4g63 Front Case & Oil Pump Rebuild
Here we disassemble, clean, inspect and rebuild both popular 4g63 front cases. This is not difficult, you just need to know what to look for. Something else that happens in this video is the analysis of one of the factors that caused my 7-bolt engine to fail. It wasn't the only cause, and we'll talk about that later, but left to its own devices and without the other contributing factors, it would have been the only cause.





4g63 Block Oil Gallery Mod
This modification is intended to improve your 4g series engine's oil delivery. People frequently discover large chunks of flash in their engine's main oil gallery. It's because the galleries are part of the cast, they're not machined into the block. There is also a very rough sharp edge where the main oil gallery is bored into the block, and oil must make a slightly greater-than 90° turn in order to begin its course to the parts it lubricates. Both of these conditions cause turbulence in the oil flow. My goal in this video is to eliminate as much of that as I can. This is a cheap and easy modification if you have the tools, and the patience. Any engine with cast-in oil galleries could probably benefit from this. Be careful not to cut into the high pressure oil gallery or else you will circulate un-filtered oil to the #1 main, oil pump, and rear balance shaft. You will also deprive the rest of the engine the oil pressure it needs to operate. So in short, punch a hole in that and it's trash. I did this my way, everyone may choose to do this a different way. I just wanted to make this video to raise awareness. Also, there's a great thread on DSMtuners about this. Pictures and everything. Written by a machinist and friend of the DSM community. Go give him some reps because he's posted a lot of great info about the DSM oil system over the years. http://www.dsmtuners.com/forums/articles-engine-fuel/452546-4g63-block-oili ng-mod.html





Cylinder Head 204 - Porting & Polishing
This is a first-generation 1992 1.6L Hyundai Elantra small-combustion-chamber head. Thats what it is. It's a J1 Elantra cylinder head. Good luck finding another one like it. (read more)... In Cylinder Head 106 I talked about the mainstream porting theories as they are discussed. We looked at a cylinder head that I have thousands of dollars of professional work performed on, and a bone-stock second-generation head that I didn't port. In this video I just might do something you haven't seen done before. For some, that may be uncomfortable. The port and polish job I perform here is what I think will work best for my current build. This is not an extreme killer port job. What will be different here is where port textures are concerned, I will be following the advice of a reputable source that will remain un-named. You're free to port yours differently than I do in this video, and I give you that out, around the 20 minute marker. The Hyundai is far from being an ultimate-performance build. It's a $400 box of scraps with nothing but time invested. It's perfect for this video. My finished product WILL be an improvement over what I had. I don't yet have access to a flow bench. I still have an achievement to un-lock. As far as you should be concerned with the techniques I employ... without flow numbers there is no evidence of what this will do, but we will gather lots of info from dynp sessions and drag strip time slips. If I could test it on a flow bench, I would. There are MANY, and when I say many, I mean thousands of flame war mongering pirates floating around on rough seas with a hair trigger cannon finger itching to fire if you port a head any differently than what the herd mentality says to do while porting a cylinder head. I cover the herd mentality because it has merit. It's been tested. Tried and true. But I don't follow it to the letter of the law. I'm definitely not here to de-bunk it. I would port a cylinder head differently for each build based on how that engine was used. There's an extremely valid reason why relating to air speed. It's not the texture of a port that maximizes the effect of fuel atomization, but the velocity of the air running through an x or y sized valve. The driving factor in this is the piston speed. I'm not going to give you the technical information, but will refer you to information about the Lovell factor. There's a better description of this in the links below, and even a calculator to help you find your engine's sweet spot. Why the Lovell factor is important: https://www.highpowermedia.com/blog/3346/the-effect-of-valve-size Lovell gas factor calculator: http://www.rbracing-rsr.com/lovellgascalc.html Only people who have flow testing equipment know for sure what really works and have the capability to produce a perfectly-matched port job for the ultimate performance build. Those guys know the definition of ultimate, and THEY are floating below the water Aegis-class submarines ready to blow your comment up if you don't know what you're talking about. They don't care if you're an armchair mechanic or a herd of pirates. I will say, they're zoomed in pretty close on me right now, and I'm expecting to take a few hits. My work will be tested based on Dyno and drag strip performance, and the results will be posted here. Fortunately, those kinds of videos are a WHOLE LOT EASIER TO MAKE!!!





Blueprint 108 - inspect the deck
There's a reason why there are no subtitled specifications in this video for the block. It's because they don't exist in either service manual, 1g or 2g. You're not supposed to remove material from a block on the deck surface because it has ill effects on parts of the combustion chamber geometry, and alters your compression ratio. It can be done intentionally in some cases for a desired side-affect, but if you have to deck a 4g63 head, it would be advised to use a thicker head gasket. The Mitsubishi Multi-Layered-Steel or MLS gasket is slightly thicker than the OEM composite gasket. Also, HKS, Power Enterprise, Cometic, and other performance brands all make MLS gaskets that are .065 and thicker. THERE IS ONE ERROR IN THE VIDEO. I said a block with .002" warpage is junk. I was completely and totally wrong. While I don't wish to spread misinformation, I don't think it's a big enough error to warrant re-editing this video. I just wasn't paying attention. .002" warpage on a cylinder head is the service limit before it needs machining. I meant to say .02"... or two HUNDREDTHS (not thousandths) of an inch. ...and here's my justification... A warped block to me is junk either way even if its minimal because your MLS gasket will never seal unless both the head and the block are perfectly flat. Trust your machine shop to get the values for how much is taken off, and buy the correct thickness gasket for your machine work. A factory head gasket (composite) is .051" The MLS Mitsubishi gasket is available in the stock .051 and a .062" Cometic makes gaskets up to .072" There are some brands that go as high as .127", but I'd have thrown both the block and head away long before then.





Crankshaft Refurbishing
Many of you have seen this one before. I apologize if bringing it back offends anyone. Domestickilla gave me a crankshaft, and it's a nice one that I want to clean up and use again. You'll be seeing a lot of it and because of this, this video deserves to be here. I fixed what I broke, and this was my experience. In this video Ballos Precision Machine demonstrates magnetic dye penetrant testing, crankshaft polishing and inspecting the balance of a "butchered" 4g63 6-bolt crankshaft.





Hyundai 4g63 Assembly Part 1
HOLD ON TIGHT! HERE WE GO! We begin the blueprint and assembly on my 1992 Hyundai Elantra's bastardized 4g63. The parts used in this are from a mash of different brands and models outside of the typical 2.0L 4g63, but the specs and standards I am following for its assembly are for the 2.0L DOHC. If you want to follow along in your service manual to verify what I've done here in this video, the processes we cover here detail pages 11C-95 through 11C-105 of the 1g Overhaul manual. I would prefer you not rip them from the binding and throw them away, relying only on this video for instruction... but rather use this video as a motivational guide, and as a demonstration of the techniques involved in those sections. You gotta do the cooking by the book. I never had any intention of making instructional videos on this particular car, but after it blew up I slowly realized it's actually a better case study for how a 4g63 ticks than anything else in my driveway. There are several reasons for this. One being that it's a mix of parts that shouldn't be bolted together, and the other is that many of you watching my videos aren't trying to build a 600hp engine out of aftermarket parts. You're trying to put back together what used to be your daily driver. This car covers those bases. Don't think for a second I won't go through this same trouble and level of detail for the GSX. I will. When I do, having this information in this video will give you a better understanding on how and why I do things the way I do when I get there. This was the shortest I could condense this video. I've never uploaded a video this long, and I hope I never have to do it again. It took a month to create on cutting-edge equipment, 16 hours to export, and 9 hours for YouTube to process. My script for the voiceover is 6 times longer than the whole script for the movie Pootie Tang. 6 times. Longer. Than a Hollywood movie.





4G63 Datsun 1200 - Jett Racing
Mitsubishi 4G63 turbo powered Datsun 1200 Ute by Jett Racing. Racing in the Pro Compact class at the 2012 Sport Compact Brisbane Jamboree. http://www.fullBoost.com.au Get your track gear! http://shop.fullBoost.com.au Follow us on social media @ Google+ https://plus.google.com/+fullBoost Facebook http://www.facebook.com/fullBoostcomau YouTube http://www.youtube.com/user/fullBoostcomau Twitter https://twitter.com/fullBoostcomau Instagram http://instagram.com/fullBoostcomau





Block Preparation Part 1
Preparation for powder coating and Glyptal application. Audio track is an original performance by Rojo Del Chocolate. My block is being powder coated rather than painted. It's just something I do. The GSX had it on the last block so it's getting it again. Since the tools are so similar and the mess is the same, I'm going ahead and preparing it for the Glyptal application as well. These 2 coatings will require being baked separately. The powder coating is baked on at a hotter temperature than the Glyptal, so it's going first. The surface preparation instructions for Glyptal is as follows: Surface to be painted should be dry and free from dirt, wax, grease, rust and oil. Remove all grease and oil by washing surface with mineral spirits. Wipe or scrape off all loose dirt, rust or scale. The last sentence is what's covered in this video. The 2nd sentence happens next (although it's already degreased), and I'll get it back from powder coat with it in the state described in sentence #1 completed. If following these instructions to the letter of the law. Second and third opinions in... the main journal is fine. You'll notice that I didn't coat the main caps, or "suitcase handles". I'm not going to. You bang around on these installing and removing them, and I don't want to risk chipping them once they're coated. They're below the windage area, and there will also be an un-coated main bearing girdle down there. This video covered 25 hours of actual work. Yes, I kept changing into the same filthy clothes every shoot because I wanted it to look consistent. You have to take your time doing this kind of work, and be VERY VERY CAREFUL! If for some reason you're crazy enough to attempt what I do in this video, you do so at your own risk. This is an elective treatment that I've never done, but I am by no means the first person to do it. I'm learning about it just like the rest of you.





New Year's Eve Hyundai Teardown
It goes like this. One of the best friends I've ever had built this car from junk parts. He said it best, "it was built from literally a box of scraps". It ran an 13.2 in the quarter mile using no aftermarket performance parts of any kind. That quarter mile time was limited by traction. I know this car had more in it, but I never managed to get it to stick before encountering this. More on this build... The proper bolts were not always available, but the builder knows isht from Shinola. Even though this engine defies all engineering logic from Mitsubishi, the builder knew what would work and what would not. Budget was of the most primary of his concerns, and it shows at every turn, and it's what brought us to the kind of failure we find in this video. I asked him what bearings he used. He said, "...the least expensive ones I could find. Picture Aluglides. Now picture generic Aluglides. I paid half-as-much for those bearings as I would for generic Aluglides. Bolt too long? Put a nut on it and shorten it. Oil pan too close to the pickup? Hammer a big dent in it to make clearance for it. Wrong water pipe? Put a brass hardware store tee in the line to tap a turbo coolant feed. Forget buying ARP's, this is an all-standard re-used factory fastenere'd no-oil-squirter .030"-overbore 6-bolt with the cut-off balance shaft mod. It's using a small combustion chamber head off of a 1.6L Mirage with a 2.0L non-turbo block. The plug wires are used. The radiator hoses were used. Everything but the head gasket came from a junk car. The FWD turbo gearbox is from my 150,000 mile old Plymouth Laser that donated the block to the Colt. This is one of the most amusing cars I've ever wrapped my fingers around because of these kinds of character-building attributes. Nevermind that the chassis has less than 70,000 miles on it (not bad for a '92), it's just that it's built without using any new parts. Parts were substituted when they were not available, and it's ridiculously powerful. Thank you Jamie. You discovered your answer. I'm happy to help. I'll be changing some things like the oil pan bolts, bearing quality, some of the plumbing and fixing a few wiring harness problems, but I'm not changing anything else if I can avoid it. This car was never intended to have anything upgraded to deliver raw power, and I'll do my best to keep it that way, replacing and restoring what failed so that we can keep pushing these generic non-turbo .030" over pistons to the limit. Apparently, 24 PSI from a 14b is not enough. In the meantime, my diagnosis is that excessive oil pressure lead to the breakdown of the #1 bearing. After all, it's the 1st bearing in-line in the oil system on the main gallery. It's the most isolated from clutch harmonics, yet it was the one that spun. The #1 bearing supplies the oil pump. The teardrop on the head is nearly gone from head resurfacing, and this is a no-balance-shaft no-oil-squirter block. I think high oil pressure is why it falls on its face above 6000 rpms. There's a restriction upstream from the lifters and they deflate at high RPMs, losing lift. I'll fix it. I've got the parts.





4g63 Block Cleanup & Oil System Mods
With no data other than another person's testimony and from observing the condition of failed rod bearings I was able to determine this engine suffered problems from high oil pressure. There are 3 modifications that wanted to perform to its oil system, and 2 parts I chose to replace. All of the videos that go into greater detail about these modifications and parts are linked from this video. Though I've covered these topics, this is a video of the work being done to the Hyundai because it's part of its mod list. Also in the process I've stripped and removed all gaskets in preparation for parts washing. All of these tasks can be completed without an air compressor by taking your time with a razor blade or using electric grinding tools. If you're doing this kind of work, I strongly suggest for time's sake that you use an air compressor. If you have access to an air compressor and any of these [cheap] tools, then you can do these kinds of modifications for less than $20. NAPA sells everything but the spudger (below) individually so there's no need to buy these consumable supplies in bulk. 3m bristle discs: http://lmgtfy.com/?q=3m+roloc+bristle+disc I used this cleaning up the oil pan. It's a spudger. An electronics tool. http://lmgtfy.com/?q=spudger I also used 3m Scotch Brite wheels to clean the oil pan's gasket surface. http://lmgtfy.com/?q=roloc+3m+scotch+brite+wheel+mmm7486





CRANKWALKED? 7-bolt teardown 1080HD
Now this is a story all about how My bearings got flipped-turned upside down And I'd like to take a minute just sit right there And tell you how I used to mix and burn my gas and my air. In RVA suburbs born and raised On the dragstrip is where I spent most of my days Chillin out, maxin, relaxing all cool, 'n all shooting some BS outside with my tools When a couple of guys who were up to no good Started running races in my neighborhood I heard one little knock and my rods got scared And said "You put it in the garage until you figure out where..." I Begged and pleaded that it not be that way, But it didn't want to start and run another day. I kissed it goodbye, because the motor punched its ticket I got out my camera, said "I might as well kick it." Crankwalk yo this is bad Drinking metal shavings from an oil pan. Is this what the rumor of crankwalk is like? Hmm this won't be alright But wait I heard knocking, grinding and all that Is this the type of failure that should happen to this cool cat? I don't think so, I'll see when I get there I hope they're prepared for this video I share. Well I pulled all the bolts and when I came out There were chunks in my fluids in the pan and they drained out I aint all depressed cause I seen this before. I got my books and my wrench and we'll do it once more. I sprang into action like lightning disassembled I whistled while I worked and my hands never trembled If anything you could say that this bling is rare, and when I saw what broke I stained my underwear. I turned off the air compressor 'bout 7 or 8 And I yelled to crankcase "Yo holmes, smell ya later" I looked at my internals they were finally there To sit on my workbench and stink up the air. Audio track by RojoDelChocolate. Here's the 48,000 mile-old 7-bolt I blew up summer 2011 after over 150 drag passes, a half dozen Dyno sessions, 4 transmissions, 3 clutches and 10 years of hard all-weather use.





7-Bolt Shortblock Failure - Full Diagnosis
If you are your own mechanic, there is no more important character trait worthy of development than the ability to own your mistakes. That's where the line is drawn between good mechanics and bad mechanics. It's not the failures but how they deal with them that measures their ability. In short, it's not easy to admit you did something wrong or were negligent. But if you don't own it and talk about it, it doesn't get fixed, and nothing positive can come from it. It was my quest to overcome my clutch issue that lead to the creation of a video. That video is the textbook perfect guide for how to correctly install a DSM transmission. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6bE_9sWtnSY&list=PL4B97C16D423317DD Crankwalk as described is caused by a casting defect. This was not a defect. This was preventable. A lot of people would find something like this and not tell anyone out of embarrassment. I'm not ashamed. It's my fault. I got good use out of this engine and it was tough enough to make it 48K miles since the last rebuild despite my abuse. I'm here to tell you if you bought a used car that's had its clutch replaced, or if you ever pay someone else to do it... make sure it has this bolt. It's stashed away between the starter and the transfer case, so it's hard to see. Make sure all of your bell housing bolts are torqued properly because fastener problems can destroy your shortblock, clutch and transmission. If your car fails because of a mis-aligned transmission, you have no reason to blame crankwalk. It wasn't until I bought my next AWD car that I discovered there was a smaller bolt on the other side of the block. I destroyed 3 transmissions in the GSX first. With the damage already done to my crankshaft, I then lost a shortblock. It's an ounce of prevention that's worth metric tons on your bank account. Grade 10 M8x60 bell housing bolt = MD706012. It gets 22-25'lbs of torque. Owning my mistake permits me to learn from it through con$equence$, and never repeat it. What good would it have done anyone else for me to learn this lesson and not share it? That's why I'm providing this video to all of you. Sharing it can perhaps help someone else avoid this costly mistake. This is the final chapter for my 7-bolt, and this book is going back on the shelf. Here are some valuable resources if you're trying to read bearing damage: http://www.enginebuildermag.com/Article/5150/csi_engine_bearings_when_good_ bearings_go_bad.aspx http://catalog.mahleclevite.com/bearing/ http://www.studebaker-info.org/tech/Bearings/CL77-3-402.pdf And of course, now that I've covered the complete oil system, transmission and driveshaft series of videos, you now have all the tools necessary to ensure your 4g63 lasts a very long time. Whether the casting defect exists?... or it's all caused by a bolt, or the harmonics, or whatever... Sure, crankwalk exists and it's horrible. But with the small amount of movement required for your crankshaft before it contacts the block isn't far enough to make your clutch drop to the floor when you turn. You'd be hearing woodpeckers and jackhammers on the crank long before that clutch pedal would fall to the floor. Some people are going to hate on me for saying that. That's fine. I believe all of the people who experienced the clutch pedal issues had fastener problems on their bell housing. DSMs get a bad reputation for this but we can change that. Crankwalk is never the cause of your engine failure. Crankwalk is always a symptom of the real problem. It's your disease that makes you deny it's your fault. You've got the 'itis. DSM-itis. Whenever you dig deeper, you'll discover what applied all of those thrust loads to your crankshaft to begin with, and it's not going to be a casting defect that moves your crank .101". Mine only went .014", but all of the same parts failed. PLEASE tell me in the comments if you find this bolt is missing from your car.





Why so SIRIUS? Kia 4g64?
This video assumes you're aware that various iterations of the 4g series Mitsubishi engines are designated as Sirius I & II. For detailed information about which engines qualify as which, visit: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mitsubishi_Sirius_engine There's also this at EvolutionM: http://forums.evolutionm.net/evo-engine-turbo-drivetrain/278462-official-hyundai-2-4l-g4js -4g64-thread.html Good luck finding info about this using Hyundai and Kia in searches. Wikipedia doesn't have any info about it grouped with the Sonatas either. There is no question what this is, well illustrated in this video. I apologize for the length of this video, but a lot of ground is covered in a short time. Hopefully there's some information in here you may someday use. I'm just trying to expose it because there doesn't seem to be any real information floating around in the forums about this yet. The car is a first-generation 1999-2005 Kia Optima sedan. It has the EVO equivalent of a 4g64 2.4L. Before using any of these parts, do your research, cross-reference your parts and know what you're getting into. Using parts from this rotating assembly in a 2g Eclipse will require aftermarket rods and/or custom pistons. This is information for those who wish to frankenstein their builds, or save a buck... whichever.... either one of those requires skill.





Porsche 911 w/ 4g63 swap 650HP test launch
Check out this unique 650HP Porsche with the heart of a Mitsubishi 4g63 turbocharged engine!!!!!! Wait till the end to see the sick test launch





Boost Leak Testing 202: Hair Spray 1080HD
Why do I know about this? I'm tired of being the one knowing all the weird crap. If everyone knows it, it won't be weird anymore. It will be commonplace. By the time I'm done sealing up all of my own Boost leaks, all of you will also be experts as well. I'm sure most of you would teach me something, too... but you subscribed, so here it comes... something I learned in my travels... Also, thanks Ilya M. I've only heard about it twice in my life. It worked great for the one time I've ever needed it, and I'm a huge fan.





Which car is faster? Which Car is Faster?




Similar 1/4 mile timeslips to browse:

1978 Volkswagen Golf : 8.293 @ 175.100
16Vampir, Engine: 2.0L 16V ABF, Turbos: Extreme Tuners custom Tires: 26x10-15


1991 Volkswagen Golf 19E: 8.657 @ 165.440
16Vampir, Engine: 1.8 16V, Turbos: GTX4202R Tires: 23x7.5


2008 Volkswagen Golf GTI: 9.737 @ 144.310
Tasos Kakaris, Tires: MH


1989 Volkswagen Golf 19E: 10.006 @ 142.410
Boba, Engine: 2.0L 16V KR, Turbos: GT4094R


1998 Volkswagen Golf 19E: 10.006 @ 142.410
Boba, Engine: 2.0L 16V ABF, Turbos: GTX42 Tires: 205/50-15


1991 Volkswagen Golf 2 GTI 19E: 10.371 @ 140.433
Boba, Engine: 1,8L 16V KR, Supercharger: Garrett GT40R Turbos: Single Turbo Tires: MT Drag


1990 Volkswagen Golf 1.8t 20v: 10.598 @ 134.570
James Hodson, Engine: 1.8t, Turbos: IHI VF34/20 Tires: M and H Racemaster slicks


1981 Volkswagen Golf 1.9 PDtdi: 10.678 @ 128.000
Fekete Tams, Engine: 1.9 PDtdi, Turbos: Gyula Tires: MH racemaster


2006 Volkswagen Golf V GTI: 10.832 @ 128.920
sotiriou konstantinos, Engine: 2.0l, Turbos: garrett gtx3076


2004 Volkswagen Golf 1.8T: 10.855 @ 126.820
Casper, Engine: Modified 1.8 T, Supercharger: gReddy Turbos: Modified Stock Turbo Tires: Toyo


1991 Volkswagen Golf 19E: 10.880 @ 132.350
Boba, Engine: 2.0L 16V KR Turbo, Turbos: GT3582R Tires: Toyo Drag Slicks


1983 Volkswagen Golf MK1 G60: 12.094 @ 115.000
Holger Wentzel, Engine: 1.8l 8V-G60, Tires: MT 22.0/8.0-13


2011 Volkswagen Golf R20: 12.253 @ 111.850
Mohamed Faiz Rassool, Engine: 2.0 FSI, Supercharger: N/A Turbos: FACTORY K04


2003 Volkswagen Golf Golf MK4 GTI 1.8T 4motion: 12.320 @ 114.000
Dorin, Engine: 1.8T AUM, Turbos: GT3071 Tires: 225/40/18 yokohama parada


2014 Volkswagen Golf 7 Gti : 12.600 @ 113.700
Junaid ally, Engine: Stock, Turbos: Stock Tires: Hoosiers


1987 Volkswagen Golf : 13.200 @ 110.000
John, Engine: 2035 cc 16v, Tires: yoko slicks


1982 Volkswagen Golf 1.9 PDTDI: 13.610 @ 108.060
Csaba Parczai, Engine: 1900cm3 130Hp-pumpe-dse PdTdi, Turbos: KKK-BV50 Tires: 215/40R16street;185/55r15slick on track


1989 Volkswagen Golf mk2 vr6: 13.960 @ 98.920
Joel Babb, Tires: semi slicks


1989 Volkswagen Golf : 13.960 @ 98.200
Joel Babb, Tires: Avon Semi Slick


1992 Volkswagen Golf : 14.180 @ 95.903
Alex, Engine: Vr6, Supercharger: N/A Turbos: N/A Tires: Toyo Proxes RA1


 


©2015 DragTimes - Disclaimer - Contact Us