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1964 Plymouth Belvedere 2 door 440 4speed for sale

This is a very nice solid old car perfect to restore or make your very own Max Wedge car. It has a 440 and a 4 speed and a 83/4 rear in it. The car is very solid and not a rust bucket. This would be perfect to make a drag car out of street car or even restore it back to stock.


 


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1967 plymouth Barracuda cuda 440 mopar
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440 Plymouth Belvedere at Merrill Ice Drags
440 Powered Belvedere Racing at Merrill Ice Drags





1970 Plymouth Barracuda cuda for sale on ebay
This is a very solid and nice car to make one of the most saught after iconic musclecar out of. It came from the factory with a slant six and a manual trans mission. So big time pluse for somebody that wants a 4 speed car.





Wheelstanding 1964 Plymouth Max Wedge Super Stock
Check out a couple of awesome wheelstands by a 1964 Plymouth Super Stock Max Wedge car from the 2008 Columbus Chrysler Classic. Visit our website to order the entire 3 hour and 52 minute DVD of the 2008 Columbus Chrysler Classic.





1965 Dodge Coronet Hemi AFX Funny Car Virtual Ride
Come go for a ride in this 528-Fuel-Injected-All Aluminum-Hemi-Powered altered wheelbase AFX funny car. NHRA outlawed these lethally fast machines for most of 1965, allowing them to eventually return due to large crowds they draw. This one brings more cubes and electronic fuel injection to the table. We raise hell in Dallas, Texas. Enjoy!





1961 Chevrolet pickup custom street truck
This is a very solid 1961 chevy street truck. It has air bags and allot of other customs suspenion work done to it. It would be a nice project LMC makes everything for the truck brand new so putting this truck on the road wouldnt be a big deal. Nice soild old truck and its very straight.





ForPly -- 1964 Plymouth Belvedere
Unveiled at SEMA Show 2012, this street-legal 1964 Plymouth Belvedere combines old school American style with modern NASCAR racing technology.  Aptly named 'ForPly,' the custom car marks Ray Evernham's debut as a car designer and builder. The ForPly will be a featured vehicle at Barrett-Jackson's Scottsdale auction in January 2013.  Net proceeds from the sale will go to Evernham Family Racing for a Reason, a foundation that is funding IGNITE, a new program and facility in Davidson, N.C. operated by the Autism Society of North Carolina.





57 Tulsa buried 1957 Plymouth Belvedere Boyd Coddington
Tulsa Story :This is a video pictorial of the 1957 Plymouth Belvedere that was buried in Tulsa, Oklahoma on June 15, 1957 as a time capsule. It was uncovered 50 years later on June 15, 2007. I was hoping to see a pristine version of "Miss Belvedere", but as it turned out, the vault leaked and filled with water, causing much damage to the automobile. As a car enthusiast, I watched the story develop over the past few years. I waited and watched it live online as she was extracted from the ground. When I saw the rust-colored dirt and muck on her, I had a bad feeling about her condition. I wish the person who won this car (by guessing the closest to the town's actual 2007 population back in 1957) could have it restored, but that would be a massive undertaking. On the other hand, she should get a chance to dance again! I hope you enjoy the video, along with some before, during, and after photos. update the winner of this car was Raymond Humbertson died in 1979 he was Marine and a Korean War veteran he has 2 sisters who may inherit he car Thanks, Chris Miss Belvedere Moves On By Old Cars Weekly After spending nearly 50 years quietly rusting beneath the Tulsa County Courthouse lawn, the 1957 Plymouth Belvedere affectionately known as "Miss Belvedere," is on the road once again. Don't get too excited, when she rolled out of Tulsa earlier today, it wasn't under her own power—she was whisked out of town in the back of a truck. After months of legal wrangling to establish ownership of what is clearly the most famous "finned" Mopar in the world (yes, even more famous than Stephen King's "infamous" Christine), Miss Belvedere has begun her journey to New Jersey — and possibly a rust-free future. Levada Humbertson Carney and Catherine Humbertson Johnson, elderly sisters from Maryland, will officially take possession of the Belvedere as beneficiaries of their brother Raymond Humbertson who won the car as part of a contest held back in 1957. Buried with the car was a time capsule containing people's guesses as to what the population of Tulsa would be in 2007. Included among the hundreds of guesses, was one made by Raymond Humbertson of Cumberland, Md., who died in 1979. His guess was only 2,286 off the actual census numbers, closer than any other entry. Assisting the cars elderly owners will be Levada Carney's son Robert Carney and Dwight Foster, President of the UltraOne Corporation. As you will recall, as part of this ongoing saga, New Jersey-based UltraOne, manufacturer of a line of rust removal products, will now begin the pain-staking process of de-rusting and preserving what remains of the rusty relic. According to Robert Carney, the car, which suffers from extensive damage after being submerged in conditions described as a "watery grave" for an unknown number of years, may eventually be able to take to the road under her own power. Once Miss Belvedere arrives in New Jersey she will undergo a lengthy cleansing and rust removal process that her new owners and the folks at UltraOne hope will stabilize the car before sealing it with a clear-coat designed to halt the rusting process. "We will not be restoring the car but preserving her for the future," Mr. Foster told the Tulsa World. "We have to stop the rust, because if nothing is done, this car will be dust in two years." According to the UltraOne Web site, future plans for Miss Belvedere could include a second Tulsa unveiling and a tour around the country for special events. Following the tour, the car's future remains unclear. However, it has speculated that the car could find her way to the Barrett-Jackson auction block in Scottsdale in the coming years. we will miss you the legend Boyd Coddington,





Driving to work in my 1958 Plymouth - Christine's on the road again!
This is me and Christine on my way to work. It's just a short trip to test my new camera. Finally I'm able to do HD videos. Sorry, I still can't afford a GoPro! :) If you're a fan of the movie "Christine" or 1957 / 58 Plymouths in general don't forget to join the International Christine Club. More information here: http://www.internationalchristineclub.net





Gary Byrne's Hot Rod.mpg
440 cubic inches of American muscle! GLORIOUS sound. 1964 Plymouth Fury





Daredevil Driving Stunts in a 1936 Plymouth: "Trial by Torture" 1935 Chrysler Corporation
more at http://cars.quickfound.net/ Toughness of the 1936 Plymouth is demonstrated by showing how components, structures, and the entire vehicle are "torture tested." Includes several good shots of deliberately rolling cars, and daredevil driving by "Hell Drivers' such as Lucky Teter and Jimmy Lynch. Public domain film from the Prelinger Archive, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plymouth_(automobile) Plymouth was a marque of automobiles based in the United States, produced by the Chrysler Corporation and its successor DaimlerChrysler. Production was discontinued on June 29, 2001 in the United States. The Plymouth automobile was introduced on July 7, 1928. It was Chrysler Corporation's first entry in the low-priced field, which at the time was already dominated by Chevrolet and Ford. Plymouths were actually priced slightly higher than their competition, but offered all standard features such as internal expanding hydraulic brakes that the competition did not provide. Plymouths were originally sold exclusively through Chrysler dealerships. The logo featured a rear view of the ship Mayflower which landed at Plymouth Rock. However, the Plymouth brand name came from Plymouth Binder Twine, chosen by Joe Frazer for its popularity among farmers... The origins of Plymouth can be traced back to the Maxwell automobile. When Walter P. Chrysler took over control of the troubled Maxwell-Chalmers car company in the early 1920s, he inherited the Maxwell as part of the package. After he used the company's facilities to help create and launch the Chrysler car in 1924, he decided to create a lower-priced companion car. So for 1926 the Maxwell was reworked and re-badged as the low-end Chrysler "52" model. In 1928, the "52" was once again redesigned to create the Chrysler-Plymouth Model Q. The "Chrysler" portion of the nameplate was dropped with the introduction of the Plymouth Model U in 1929. Great Depression, 1940s and 1950s While the original purpose of the Plymouth was to serve a lower-end marketing niche, during the Great Depression of the 1930s, the marque helped significantly in ensuring the survival of the Chrysler Corporation in a decade when many other car companies failed. Beginning in 1930, Plymouths were sold by all three Chrysler divisions (Chrysler, DeSoto, and Dodge). Plymouth sales were a bright spot during this dismal automotive period, and by 1931 Plymouth rose to the number three spot among all cars. In 1931 with the Model PA, the company introduced floating power and boasted, "The economy of a four; the smoothness of a six." In 1933 Chrysler decided to catch up with Ford and Chevrolet with respect to engine cylinder count. The 190 cu in version of Chrysler's flathead-6 engine was equipped with a downdraft carburetor and installed in the new 1933 Plymouth PC, introduced on 17 November 1932. However, Chrysler had reduced the PC's wheelbase from 112 in (284.5 cm) to 107 in (271.8 cm), and the car sold poorly. By April 1933, the Dodge division's Model DP chassis, with a 112 in (284.5 cm) wheelbase, was put under the PC body with DP front fenders, hood, and radiator shell. The model designation was advanced to PD and the car was marketed as the "DeLuxe" 1933 Plymouth. This car sold very well and is the 1933 model most commonly found in collections. The PC became the 'Standard Six'. It had been the 'Plymouth Six' at introduction, and was sold through to the end of 1933, but in much lower numbers. It is consequently in the minority in collectors' hands today. In 1937, Plymouth (along with the other Chrysler makes) added safety features such as flat dash boards with recessed controls and the back of the front seat padded for the rear seat occupants. The PC was shipped overseas to Sweden, Denmark, and the UK, as well as Australia. In the UK it was sold as a 'Chrysler Kew', Kew Gardens being the location of the Chrysler factory outside London. The flathead 6 which started with the 1933 Model PC stayed in the Plymouth until the 1959 models. In 1939 Plymouth produced 417,528 vehicles, of which 5,967 were two-door convertible coupes with rumble seats. The 1939 convertible coupe was prominently featured at Chrysler's exhibit at the 1939 New York World's Fair, advertised as the first mass-production convertible with a power folding top. It featured a 201 cu in, 82 hp version of the flathead six engine. For much of its life, Plymouth was one of the top-selling American automobile brands; it together with Chevrolet and Ford were commonly referred to as the "low-priced three" marques in the American market...





1964 Plymouth Belvedere
1964 Plymouth Belvedere





100 0439





133081 / 1964 Plymouth Belvedere
For more information on this vehicle visit http://tinyurl.com/9qkc8ex Listed in Darrell Davis' book of original Max Wedge serial numbers, this car is one of only fourteen 426/4-speed Belvederes produced for the 1964 model year. If you're looking for a no-nonsense pavement pounder that's fast, raw and ready to brawl, you've found your next heavyweight! An extension of legendary designer Elwood Engel's modernist rescue of Plymouth's increasingly eccentric product line, the firm's newly downsized B-Body did almost as well on Chrysler's sale charts as it did on America's drag strips and super speedways. This particular Belvedere, a Stage III Max Wedge car sold new at Powell Plymouth in Jacksonville, Florida, was likely ordered by an aspiring racer who whipped a few people on the street and then settled into a life in the slow lane. Unlike the majority of these badass Mayflower warriors, which were purchased almost exclusively for sanctioned drag racing, this car has never had its front inner aprons cut for Exhaust headers, never had a roll cage installed, and never had its rear wheel wells tubbed for oversize drag slicks. In fact, when this Plymouth's true heritage was discovered in the late 1990s, the car had been mechanically and cosmetically transformed into an all-steel, 90,000 mile slushbox special. Naturally its enlightened savior knew he had something special, so he began a frame-off restoration by welding in new floorpans from a clean donor car and hanging new quarters from a high quality aftermarket supplier. Next, when a trademark aluminum front end was finally located, it was re-skinned, thoroughly worked, and perfectly aligned with its new body. And finally, after much parts research and even more parts searching, a wet-looking coat of correct Chrysler code P Ruby Red paint was buried in a thick clearcoat shell that shines like a trophy on race day! Gently lift this Plymouth's Ruby Red hood and you'll find an date-correct Max Wedge V8 that wears an authentic 2406730-1 casting number, a December (12) 10th (10) of 1963 (03) date stamp, and a 1964 V-series (V) Maximum Performance (MP) High Compression (HC) 426 cubic inch (426) engine stamp. Pushing a brutal 12.5 to 1 compression, and currently Dyno-ed at 486 horsepower and 469 lb./ft. of torque, this Mopar monster has built a hard-fought reputation for being one of the best competition motors ever created. That high powered big block churns torque through a tough A833 4-speed manual transmission to an original, factory-narrowed 8.75 rear end. During the restoration that transmission, which is a correct piece that's dated slightly after the car was assembled, received new bearings, new synchros, a new clutch and pressure plate and a correct cast steel bellhousing. And that rear end, which rides below original factory frame weights, was fitted with a new Sure Grip differential and tall 4.10 gears. At the ends of that stellar drivetrain, an original torsion bar front and leaf spring rear suspension, which has been completely rebuilt from top to bottom, helps increase both drivability and track times. At the sides of that stellar drivetrain, original Max Wedge Exhaust pipes whisk spent gases to either manual dumps or factory replacement turbo mufflers. And all this first rate hardware proudly stands on a set of 14 inch body-matched steel wheels which spin fresh 205/75 Hurst radials and 215/75 Hurst cheater slicks around pristine stainless center caps. Take a look inside the car and you'll find a spacious and airy environment which has enough room to haul the whole family in comfort. Top dead center is a pair of red bench seats that are lined with new padding, stitched with NOS covers and accented by bright stainless trim. Below those seats, new black carpet does an excellent job of highlighting the car's original, and re-chromed, Hurst shifter. In front of those seats, a two-tone dash hangs a silver '49 Plymouth-inspired instrument panel next to original radio and heater deletes. And in front of the driver, a restored steering wheel spins a red rim around a pristine chrome horn ring. This aluminum-nosed Belvedere is a super cool piece of muscle car history that's easy to imagine as the focal point of a sunny 60s track day. Call, click or visit http://RKMotorsCharlotte.com for more information on this awesome car!





1964 PLYMOUTH SPORT FURY, MOSTLY ORIGINAL RARE SURVIVOR
THIS RARE PLYMOUTH SPORT FURY, 1 OF 3,858 CONVERTIBLES PRODUCED, IS AN EXCELLENT EXAMPLE OF AN ORIGINAL SURVIVOR. THE INTERIOR, THE TRUNK LINING, THE MIDNIGHT BLUE PAINT ARE ALL ORIGINAL. THE ENGINE COMPARTMENT, HOLDING A 383 CID V-8, IS SLIGHTLY MODIFIED. THE CONVERTIBLE TOP AND BOOT HAS BEEN REPLACED AND LOOKING GOOD. THE ODOMOMETER READING STOOD AT 42,000 WHEN THIS VIDEO WAS TAKEN. THIS 3,405 LB. CAR COST $3,095 NEW AND ONLY OFFERED THIS ENGINE WHICH WAS ONE OF 8 VERSIONS PLYMOUTH HAD THAT YEAR. I LIKE THAT THE OWNER OF THIS MOUNTED THE REDLINE TIRES POPULAR THEN FOR MUSCLE CARS. BUT THE VINYL INTERIOR IS AMAZINGLY IN PRISTENE CONDITION, FOR YOU KNOW HOW VINYL CAN RIP OR CRACK AFTER AWHILE. SO, THIS CAR IS RARE AND IT IS AN ORIGINAL SURVIVOR REGARDLESS OF TIRES AND ENGINE COMPARTMENT UPGRADES. Another rare original survivor brought to you by 55lincoln.





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Similar 1/4 mile timeslips to browse:

1964 Plymouth Belvedere : 9.944 @ 131.610
Fred Hutchinson, Engine: 440 stroked to 500, Tires: Moroso front, Phoenix 31.25W x 15


1964 Plymouth Belvedere 426 Max Wedge: 10.060 @ 135.170
Bill Goswick, Engine: 426 Max Wedge, Supercharger: NA Turbos: NA Tires: Hoosier 10.5 slicks


1967 Plymouth Belvedere II: 11.553 @ 116.450
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1967 Plymouth Belvedere : 12.580 @ 111.020
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1967 Plymouth Belvedere 2: 14.090 @ 97.200
renea berger, Engine: 383, Tires: 2556015


 


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