VW Golf V 1.9 TDI diesel Nürburgring lap...

TDI Power!!!! Fast? Hell no! Fun? Absolutely! A 105 hp TDI VW Golf V diesel with 3 adults on board taking a lap on the Nürburgring Nordschleife. This was back in October of 2004. I think it was about the 3rd time I'd driven the track. Since then I've broken into the 8 minute range driving "proper" cars. Other than the obvious power deficit, the car was enjoyable to drive for a FWD econobox. The brakes were plenty up to the task (got a little fade at the very end) and the handling was fairly neutral.

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2005 VW Golf Comfortline 1.9 TDI Full Review,Start Up, Engine, and In Depth Tour
For more in depth reviews check my channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/avtomobil... Filmed by: Tomaž Kožar Jesenice One of the pioneers in the small hatchback segment, the Volkswagen Golf has had a bit of a roller-coaster ride throughout its life. Debuting in Europe in 1974, it came to the U.S. a year later wearing the Rabbit nameplate. Ten years later and coinciding with a redesign, VW shifted the North American version to the official "Golf" name. But even that did not last. In 2006, after selling three generations of the Golf to American buyers, Volkswagen had a nostalgic feeling and renamed its economy car the Rabbit for the U.S. market. But guess what? Volkswagen has had yet another change of heart and has reverted back to the Golf name for 2010. Yep, it's confusing. Hopefully, VW's Golf name is back for good this time. Current Volkswagen Golf The Volkswagen Golf is a compact hatchback available in a two- or four-door body style. Regardless of body style, the base Golf is powered by a 2.5-liter five-cylinder engine that produces 170 horsepower. A five-speed manual is standard and a six-speed automatic is optional. Standard equipment includes air-conditioning, full power accessories, cruise control, a tilt-and-telescoping steering wheel and an auxiliary audio jack. The Golf TDI model features a 2.0-liter four-cylinder turbodiesel that produces 140 hp and a robust 236 pound-feet of torque. A six-speed manual is standard and VW's six-speed dual-clutch automated manual (DSG) is optional. EPA-estimated combined fuel economy is an impressive 34 mpg. The TDI trim also adds alloy wheels, a sport-tuned suspension, Bluetooth and an upgraded stereo with touchscreen interface and an iPod interface. A navigation system and xenon headlamps are optional. Like the Rabbit before it and the Golf before that, the current Volkswagen Golf stands apart in the compact class with an overall level of refinement that simply can't be matched. The near-luxury quality of the cabin, the European blend of smooth ride and driving involvement, and the subdued yet classy styling make the Golf's price premium worth it. Regarding the Golf's current lineup, we strongly recommend the TDI model because of its higher level of equipment, strong engine and superior fuel economy. The base engine is powerful for the class, but fuel economy suffers for it. There is also a high-performance version of the Golf known as the GTI and a closely related sedan known as the Jetta. Used Volkswagen Golf Models The Volkswagen Golf name returned for 2010, marking the first year for the redesigned sixth-generation model. Previous to this for a few years, there was the VW Rabbit. Should you be interested in a used Golf, it's important to keep this in mind. Introduced midway through the 1999 model year and sold up until mid-2006, the fourth-generation Golf sported clean lines, an impressive standard features roster and the availability of turbodiesel power -- a rarity in any segment, let alone the economy car sector. In keeping with tradition, three body styles were available: a two-door hatchback, a four-door hatchback and a convertible (sold as a separate model under the Cabrio name). Enjoyable to drive thanks to its responsive chassis, this Golf also offered a variety of engines. The GTI could be had with a 2.8-liter six-cylinder "VR6" engine (a compact, narrow-angle V6, which made up to 200 hp) or a 1.8-liter turbocharged four-cylinder. The turbo-4, or 1.8T, as it was called, made either 150 or 180 hp, depending on the year; the 150-horse version was available on the standard four-door Golf in 2000 and 2001. Known as the TDI, the Golf's diesel offering consisted of a 1.9-liter turbodiesel inline-4, initially rated for 90 hp and capable of returning nearly 50 mpg on the highway. Golf TDI models sold from 2004-'06 had an updated version of the 1.9-liter that delivered 100 hp. Late in the model run, the limited-edition high-performance R32 was offered, sporting a 3.2-liter 240-hp VR6, all-wheel drive and tasteful body accents; it was sold only as a 2004 model.





2005 VW Golf Champion 1.9 TDI Review,Start Up, Engine, and In Depth Tour
For more in depth reviews check my channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/avtomobil... Filmed by: Tomaž Kožar Jesenice One of the pioneers in the small hatchback segment, the Volkswagen Golf has had a bit of a roller-coaster ride throughout its life. Debuting in Europe in 1974, it came to the U.S. a year later wearing the Rabbit nameplate. Ten years later and coinciding with a redesign, VW shifted the North American version to the official "Golf" name. But even that did not last. In 2006, after selling three generations of the Golf to American buyers, Volkswagen had a nostalgic feeling and renamed its economy car the Rabbit for the U.S. market. But guess what? Volkswagen had yet another change of heart and reverted back to the Golf name for 2010. Yep, it's confusing. Hopefully, VW's Golf name is back for good this time. Current Volkswagen Golf The Volkswagen Golf is a compact hatchback available in a two- or four-door body style. Regardless of body style, the base Golf is powered by a 2.5-liter five-cylinder engine that produces 170 horsepower. A five-speed manual is standard and a six-speed automatic is optional. Standard equipment includes air-conditioning, full power accessories, cruise control, a tilt-and-telescoping steering wheel and an auxiliary audio jack. The Golf TDI model features a 2.0-liter four-cylinder turbodiesel that produces 140 hp and a robust 236 pound-feet of torque. A six-speed manual is standard and VW's six-speed dual-clutch automated manual (DSG) is optional. EPA-estimated combined fuel economy is an impressive 34 mpg. The TDI trim also adds alloy wheels, a sport-tuned suspension, Bluetooth and an upgraded stereo with touchscreen interface and an iPod interface. A navigation system and xenon headlamps are optional. Like the Rabbit before it and the Golf before that, the current Volkswagen Golf stands apart in the compact class with an overall level of refinement that simply can't be matched. The near-luxury quality of the cabin, the European blend of smooth ride and driving involvement, and the subdued yet classy styling make the Golf's price premium worth it. Regarding the Golf's current lineup, we strongly recommend the TDI model because of its higher level of equipment, strong engine and superior fuel economy. The base engine is powerful for the class, but fuel economy suffers for it. There is also a high-performance version of the Golf known as the GTI. Used Volkswagen Golf Models The Volkswagen Golf name returned for 2010, marking the first year for the redesigned sixth-generation model. Previous to this for a few years, there was the Rabbit. Should you be interested in a used Golf, it's important to keep this in mind. Introduced midway through the 1999 model year and sold up until mid-2006, the fourth-generation Golf sported clean lines, an impressive standard features roster and the availability of turbodiesel power -- a rarity in any segment, let alone the economy car sector. In keeping with tradition, three body styles were available: a two-door hatchback, a four-door hatchback and a convertible (sold as a separate model under the Cabrio name).Enjoyable to drive thanks to its responsive chassis, this Golf also offered a variety of engines. The GTI could be had with a 2.8-liter six-cylinder "VR6" engine (a compact, narrow-angle V6, which made up to 200 hp) or a 1.8-liter turbocharged four-cylinder. The turbo-4, or 1.8T, as it was called, made either 150 or 180 hp, depending on the year; the 150-horse version was available on the standard four-door Golf in 2000 and 2001. Known as the TDI, the Golf's diesel offering consisted of a 1.9-liter turbodiesel inline-4, initially rated for 90 hp and capable of returning nearly 50 mpg on the highway. Golf TDI models sold from 2004-'06 had an updated version of the 1.9-liter that delivered 100 hp. Late in the model run, the limited-edition high-performance R32 was offered, sporting a 3.2-liter 240-hp VR6, all-wheel drive and tasteful body accents; it was sold only as a 2004 model. Most folks shopping the used Volkswagen Golf market within these years, however, will probably be looking at the volume-seller Golfs (the GL and GLS trim levels), most of which were powered by an outdated two-valves-per-cylinder 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine. With just 115 hp -- compared to the 125-150-hp ratings of most peers -- and below-average fuel mileage, this power plant offered the worst of both worlds. Buyers looking at '99 models should note that both third- and fourth-generation Golfs were sold that year. horsepower is the same, but the engines in the new Golfs had an upgraded cylinder head design for better low-end response.





Golf V 1.9 TDI




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