Bumper Crash Test: 2007 Nissan Maxima

Go to MYRIDE.COM for more car videos. Insurance Institute for Highway Safety Bumper Performance in Low-Speed Crash Tests: 2007 Nissan Maxima.

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Crash Test: 2007 Nissan Versa
Go to MYRIDE.COM for more car videos. Insurance Institute for Highway Safety Crash Test: 2007 Nissan Versa





Crash Test 2004 - 2008 Nissan Maxima (Side Impact) IIHS
Nissan Maxima 2004-08 models SIDE IMPACT TEST WITH STANDARD SIDE AIRBAGS OVERALL EVALUATION: Marginal Injury measures Head protection Structure/safety cage Head/neck Torso Pelvis/leg Driver Good Poor Acceptable Good Marginal Rear passenger Good Good Good Good Important: Side impact crash test ratings can be compared across vehicle type and weight categories. Test details: The Nissan Maxima was redesigned for the 2004 model year. Injury measures: Driver — Measures taken from the dummy indicate that rib fractures and/or internal organ injuries would be likely in a crash of this severity. A left femur fracture would also be possible. Rear passenger — Measures taken from the dummy indicate a low risk of any significant injuries in a crash of this severity. Head protection: Driver — The dummy's head was protected from being hit by any hard structures, including the intruding barrier, by a side curtain airbag that deployed from the roof. Rear passenger — The dummy's head was protected from being hit by any hard structures, including the intruding barrier, by a side curtain airbag that deployed from the roof.





Crash Test Results for Sedan Bumpers
Bumpers on 2009 models of the Honda Accord, Hyundai Sonata, Mazda 6, and Nissan Maxima performed better than their 2007 predecessors in low-speed crash tests conducted by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. Bumpers on the 2009 Chevrolet Malibu and 2010 Ford Fusion did worse than earlier models. Get the complete story at TheAutoChannel.com.





Huge cost of mismatched bumpers
IIHS news release • December 2, 2010 Huge cost of mismatched bumpers: When bumpers on cars and SUVs don't line up (and many of them don't), low-speed collisions produce more damage and higher repair costs ARLINGTON, VA — Bumpers are the first line of defense against costly damage in everyday low-speed crashes. Bumpers on cars are designed to match up with each other in collisions, but a long-standing gap in federal regulations exempts SUVs from the same rules. New Insurance Institute for Highway Safety crash tests demonstrate the results: SUV bumpers that don't line up with those on cars can lead to huge repair bills in what should be minor collisions in stop-and-go traffic. Full text of release at: http://www.iihs.org/news/rss/pr120210.html




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