1970 440 SIX PACK Road Runner SYA! SOLD by ShowYourAuto.com

ShowYourAuto.com is proud to offer this 1970 440 SIX PACK Road Runner is favored amongst the Mopar faithful with its Air Grabber hood "440 +6" call-outs and Warner Brothers cartoon Roadrunner dust trail running down each side of the car. This is an early car, truly the earliest 440 SIX PACK Road Runner known to be produced for sale in the United States. Being such an early car, there are a few unique traits to this car not commonly found on later produced cars. This 100% numbers matching car started out as an unmolested, all original sheet metal car has been completely restored and is show worthy and road ready. For further detail call Patrick Krook at 847-838-3749 or visit her listing at http://www.showyourauto.com/am/listings/l0295.html

More Videos...


1970 Plymouth Road Runner last ride this year
A last ride this year with my Road Runner. Not many miles this summer, due to all the rain. Wife is driving two guy on their 40th birthday party.





1969 Roadrunner 440 six pack Dana disc
We finally finished this super nice1969 Road Runner, this is a full nut and bolt rotisserie resto. We started with a super straight and solid 1969 Road Runner, we took the body down to bare metal and started from scratch. Underside of the car has been coated with a rubberized bed liner for sound deadening and protection from road debris. Then we painted the top side with a really high quality base coat clear coat Black paint, we put on extra coats of clear so we would have more material to wet sand and buff to that show car finish. We put disc brakes on all four corners, tubular upper control arms and upgraded PST suspension parts. The engine is a beefed up 440 that is pushing 500 plus horse power with the 6 pack set up on it. We installed a 4 speed transmission, with a pistol grip shifter.





1970 ROADRUNNER 383 4-SPEED
1970 ROADRUNNER 383 4-SPEED





1970 Plymouth RoadRunner 440 6 pack
1970 brought new front and rear end looks to the basic 1968 body, and it would prove to be another success. Updates included a new grille, leather seats, hood, front fenders, quarter panels, single-piston Kelsey-Hayes disc brakes (improved from the rather small-rotor Bendix 4 piston calipers of '68 - '69 ), and even non-functional scoops in the rear quarters.[1] The design and functionality of the Air Grabber option was changed this year to increase both efficiency and the "intimidation factor". A switch below the dash actuated a vacuum servo to slowly raise the forward-facing scoop, exposing shark-like teeth on either side. "High Impact" colors, with names like In-Violet, Moulin Rouge, and Vitamin C, were options available for that year. The 1970 Road Runner and GTX continued to be attractive and popular cars. The engine lineup was left unchanged although a heavy-duty three-speed manual became the standard transmission, relegating the four-speed to the option list along with the TorqueFlite automatic. This was to be the second and last year of the Road Runner convertible, with only 834 made. These cars are considered more valuable than the 1969 version due to a better dash, high impact colors and more options including the new high-back bucket seats shared with other Chrysler products which featured built-in headrests. The relatively popular 440 Six Barrel was relegated to option status for 1970. The 1969 "M" Code Edelbrock aluminum intake was replaced by a factory-produced cast iron piece; however, due to a porous casting, there was a recall early in the iron intake-equipped 440+6 run, and these were supposed to be replaced with the more-desirable Edelbrock intake from the year prior. Sales of the '70 Road Runner dropped by more than 50 percent over the previous year to around 41,000 units (about 1,000 ahead of Pontiac's GTO but still about 13,000 units behind Chevy's Chevelle SS-396/454). This would also be the last year of the road runner convertible with 834 total production. Only 3 hemi (R) code road runner convertibles were built. The declining sales of Road Runner and other muscle cars were the result of a move by insurance companies to add surcharges for muscle car policies - making insurance premiums for high-performance vehicles a very expensive proposition. Also, Plymouth introduced another bargain-basement muscle car for 1970, the compact Duster 340 which was powered by a 275-horsepower 340 Magnum V8 which in the lighter-weight compact A-body could perform as well if not better than a 383 Road Runner. Furthermore, the Duster 340 was priced even lower than the Road Runner and its smaller engine qualified it for much lower insurance rates. The Chevy engine comment was a joke.




Follow