1973 Plymouth Roadrunner frame straightening

Riverside Restorations, Manotick ON, mid 2008. Due to all my moves, the house fire etc. I lost track of this video nugget. Enjoy the hi tech frame straightening machine and automotive chiropractic science at its best. The car X's out perfectly now (believe it or not) and the final moments of the vid show the Runner as it is today.

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DIY: Sheet Metal Repair & Patching
Video slideshow that outlines how to repair sheet metal. This demonstration was done on a lawn tractor mower deck, but the same principles can be applied to auto body work on vehicles. Most automotive body panels do use a thinner gauge steel, so when welding, more care will have to be taken to reduce the amount of heat distortion. In the video I did use a flux core mig welder, but an argon unit can be used as well. Website: http://4diyers.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/4diyers Google Plus: https://plus.google.com/+4DIYers Twitter: https://twitter.com/4DIYers Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/4diyers/ Tumblr: http://4diyers.tumblr.com Pintrest: https://www.pinterest.com/4diyers/ Tools/Supplies Needed: -angle grinder -angle grinder cutting disks -angle grinder flap wheels -locking pliers -mig welder -welding shield -welding gloves -hammer -paint marker -wire brush -220 grit sandpaper -paint -paint brush -safety glasses -replacement metal -propane torch -adjustable wrench -clean cloth -degreaser Procedure: -determine to what extent the metal is damaged -remove the rusty soft/thin areas will allow for a solid area to weld the patch to and also reduces the chance of having the welder burn through the existing steel -cut out the damaged area using a grinder equipped with cutting disks -start by forming the new metal to replace the damaged area -sometimes it is easier to form the replacement metal first before cutting out the damaged area, but the damaged area should still be in reasonable condition to copy the shape or contours -to form the replacement pieces I used a couple concrete blocks, along with some wood for forming, along with the assistance of a hammer, adjustable wrench, and propane torch -forming metal will vary depending on what you are trying to achieve -for my repair I first bent the metal patches, then made relief cuts using the angle grinder with cutting disks so I could form multiple contours -once finished forming the patches, ensure they fit and remove excessive material from the original panel if needed (it's better to have more newer metal in a patch repair) -use the flap wheel for the angle grinder to remove any existing rust or paint to prepare for welding -fit the patch into place, use locking pliers to hold it into place -ground the mig welder onto the piece, select a proper heat range -first tack the replacement piece into place, applying a tack weld every one to two inches -adjust piece when needed using a hammer, ensuring the edge lines up correctly -once the piece is held in, then continue with short welds about one inch in length in various areas -do no run one continuous weld as this will cause warpage -allow the metal to cool if need -once the welding has finished, use the flap wheel on the angle grinder to smoothen out the welds -finally to finish up, for my repair I used a wire brush to clean the mower deck removing any loose rust and paint -finish up with 220 grit sandpaper to smoothen out the surface -I wiped down the mower deck with a clean cloth and degreaser -then applied a farm equipment paint using a brush to the whole mower deck The cuts in the one rounded patch allows for the piece to be bent into two different directions to match the contour of the mower deck. Grind the paint off around the area where the patch will be welded to. This will ensure that welder is able to arc on the existing surface properly. The tack welds hold the piece in place and allow me to align the patch to the existing surface. For the welding, I used a small flux core mig welder. Running small/short (approx. 1" length) welding beads reduces the amount of distortion within the sheet metal which is caused by excessive heat. This will have to be adjusted accordingly depending on the gauge/thickness of steel. For grinding down the welds I used the angle grinder with standard grinding disc for the higher areas and a flap disc to smoothen the surface. For paint, I used low gloss black farm equipment painted which I brushed on. Credit: Music: Zap Beat - Kevin MacLeod (http://incompetech.com/) Licensed under Creative Commons "Attribution 3.0" http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Thank you to all those who watch my videos and support my content. Don't forget to subscribe to my channel for future tutorial videos and like my video if you found it helpful. New videos are always being uploaded every week! © 4DIYers 2013 All Rights Reserved No part of this video or any of its contents may be reproduced, copied, modified or adapted, without the prior written consent of the author.





Backhoe autobody repair hillbilly Frame straighten a chassis





The Mighty Duke - Portable Auto Body and Frame Machine - Collision Repair System
Wagner-Martin Development LLC presents The Mighty Duke! This innovative collision repair system is perfect for all size auto body repair and frame shops! It is fast to set-up, powerful, provides incredibly smooth feel-back to the user, easily rolls away and takes up little space when not in use. Inexpensive, but strong floor anchors are flush with the floor, can't be tripped over, and it won't cost a small fortune to set up shop in a new facility should you decide to move to another location. Patent Pending. Expected website launch date Jan. 13, 2013. www.TheMightyDuke.co. Questions can be sent to; gtveden@gmail.com or sales@themightyduke.co





Patching extensive unibody frame rust
I cut out and patch substantial rust damage on the unibody frame of my 95 Saturn. This is immediately behind one of the front wheels. The car was undercoated when it was new but the tires have sandblasted this section to expose the metal. Salt and water have rusted away the structure, which I had to cut out and replace. This may not be a professionally approved method but I do feel that is it solid. I will be coating the inside of the frame with rust inhibitor. Basically I cut away all the rust down to solid metal. Then I created a patch from scrap, formed it, and welded it solidly into place. Finally I painted it and will be undercoating it too. Redneck repair? Perhaps it is!




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