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Fiat 500 with Kawasaki GPZ900R motor

Fiat 500 with a Kawasaki GPZ900R engine. Mounted where the passenger used to sit, driving a solid rear axle by a chain. Painted matt black, with a 4 into 1 Exhaust exiting the passenger door. This video is from 1988, and the driver is the son of a famous Grand Prix driver...


 


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Awesome V12 Monster diesel engine Awake and Alive startup
Awesome V12 Monster diesel engine Awake and Alive startup The first V-type engine (a 2-cylinder vee twin) was built in 1889 by Daimler, to a design by Wilhelm Maybach. By 1903 V8 engines were being produced for motor boat racing by the Société Antoinette to designs by Léon Levavasseur, building on experience gained with in-line four-cylinder engines. In 1904, the Putney Motor Works completed a new V12 marine racing engine -- the first V12 engine produced for any purpose.[2] Known as the 'Craig-Dörwald' engine after Putney's founding partners, the engine mounted pairs of L-head cylinders at a 90 degree included angle on an aluminium crankcase, using the same cylinder pairs that powered the company's standard 2-cylinder car. A single camshaft mounted in the central vee operated the valves directly. As in many marine engines, the camshaft could be slid longitudinally to engage a second set of cams, giving valve timing that reversed the engine's rotation to achieve astern propulsion. "Starting is by pumping a charge into each cylinder and switching on the trembler coils. A sliding camshaft gave direct reversing. The camshaft has fluted webs and main bearings in graduated thickness from the largest at the flywheel end."[3] Displacing 1,119.9 cuin (18,352 cc) (bore and stroke of 4.875" x 5" (123.8 x 127 mm)), the engine weighed 950 pounds (430 kg) and developed 150 bhp (110 kW). Little is known of the engine's achievements in the 40-foot hull for which it was intended, while a scheme to use the engine to power heavy freight vehicles never came to fruition.[2] One V12 Dörwald marine engine was found still running in a Hong Kong junk in the late-1960s. Two more V12s appeared in the 1909-10 motor boat racing season. The Lamb Boat & Engine Company of Clinton, Iowa built a 1,558.6 cuin (25,541 cc (5.25" x 6" (133.4 x 152.4 mm)) engine for the company's 32-foot Lamb IV. It weighed in at 2,114 pounds (959 kg). No weight is known for the massive 3,463.6 cuin (56,758 cc) (7" x 7.5" (177.8 x 190.5 mm)) F-head engine built by the Orleans Motor Company. Output is quoted as "nearly 400 bhp (300 kW)". By 1914, when Panhard built two 2,356.2 cuin (38,611 cc) (5" x 10" (127 x 254 mm)) engines with four-valve cylinder heads the V12 was well established in motor boat racing.[2] In automobiles, V12 engines have not been common due to their complexity and cost. They are used almost exclusively in expensive sports and luxury cars because of their power, smoother operation and distinctive sound. ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ ▬▬ ★ MORE INTERESTING VIDEOS: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yrbwGmtZ8pM&list=UUYH8swcp71EHt-88lkaMDTQ ★ SUBSCRIBE: http://goo.gl/GynuUU ★ Follow my Twitter: https://twitter.com/GeorgeDominik1 ★ Thanks For Watching ★ ★ Post comment , share and tell us what u think ★ ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ ▬▬





Step #3 - Fiat 500 - Motore Kawasaki 1300
I° Special Award My Special Car 2008 Rimini





Engine Oil Additive that REALLY WORKS
We're always looking for great ways to help our customers at RVES; and we've sure found one this winter! We discovered a line of premium synthetic lubrication solutions that we are using in all of our own vehicles, and recommending to all of our valued customers. Check out the demo of how well our Snake Oil by BestLine motor oil additive works next to all the other products you're used to using. It's just amazing. Jaw-dropping. Check us out at http://www.a2aequipment.com





Fiat 500: Speed of Sunshine
The Fiat 500 has a long history spanning generations and spanning oceans. One particular Fiat, a Fiat 500D, has made its way over the last 49 years into the care of Annetta Calisi. After being attained in pieces, it was meticulously restored daily over a period of four months. Annetta and her Fiat, Luigi, could not be a better pair, and the lines between the past and the present fade as they both dress the part for every tiny journey they share. Drive Tastefully® http://Petrolicious.com http://facebook.com/Petrolicious





Fiat Cinquecento motore Aprilia RSV 1000 Factory
Il telaio della Fiat Cinquecento proto spinto dal bicilindrico a V di 60° della Aprilia RSV 1000 R Factory muove i primi passi. Nei prossimi giorni verrà installata la carrozzeria e si proseguirà con i test. Contattateci per info. ____________________________________________ The first meters covered by the Fiat Cinquecento prototype chassis with the Aprilia V Twin engine from the RSV 1000 R Factory. In the next days the bodywork will be installed and the test will continue. For info contact us. http://www.gullimotori.it/ gullimotori@libero.it





4performance - Building Fiat 126p Rally Edition
4performance Building Fiat 126p 1100ccm





V8 Bi-Turbo( Loco & Spenna Motorsport )Supported by http://www.sourkrauts.de
V8 Bi-turbo Käfer ,,,,,, Supported by http://www.sourkrauts.de





Step #5 - Fiat 500 - Motore Kawasaki 1300
I° Special Award My Special Car 2008 Rimini





How an engine works - comprehensive tutorial animation featuring Toyota engine technologies
Nobody this video was designed for needed to know or cared about discontinued Supra (or other long discontinued inline 6) engines so don't bother posting a comment about them. This was 2007 and newer US MARKET ONLY Toyota technologies.





CBR900RR engined mk2 escort
The SiTune mk2 escort with a blade engine in it, doin its shakedown runs





Fiat 500 with Subaru engine
See: http://www.zcars.org.uk This is a Fiat 500 modified by ZCars Ltd to the specification of a customer from Greece. The design brief was to fix his 500 in an interesting way so that it would have more useable power to enable him to drive his family around town in comfort. Whilst he was tempted to have the Suzuki Hayabusa conversion ZCars also produce he decided that he wanted to keep the rear seats. As that is where the 200bhp motorcycle would be installed that option was ruled out! The engine is an EA81 Subaru engine (1800cc flat 4) which is quite an old engine although still widely used as an aviation engine we are told. This engine was used due to its simplicity, power and torque characteristics and not least its size and shape. This was mated to the original gearbox with clutch and drive shafts up rated. Also up-rated were the brakes with discs all around and the suspension at the front. The transverse leaf spring was removed and adjustable alloy dampers were used with coil springs. A new front subframe was fitted to allow the use of wishbone suspension arms. Obviously as it is a water cooled engine, radiators were required. This was inserted into the front boot space (trunk) and water pipes run underneath the car. A new stainless steel Exhaust finished the conversion and new wheels and tyres were fitted as an optional extra.





Jet Engine Lube System
A look at the components of a typical jet engine lube system, and a simplified explanation of how they all work together. We use examples of each component from several different engines, and we go through some hand-made diagrams...





Fiat 500 vs Porsche
Fiat 500 vs Porsche





Fiat 500
Un motore tutto pepe!!





Fiat 500 turbo wroom 2008
The devlopment of the body-kit on the Fiat 500 used on the cars from the wroom 2008 Fiat 500 Challenge at Carzone Specials





Which car is faster? Which Car is Faster?




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