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How to Change Valve cover gasket - GM Buick 3800 V6 (show-How)

this video will "SHOW" How-to (DIY) replace the rubber gasket to a plastic valve cover,in event to prevent any oil leaks. EXPLAINING/in-tell to Valve Cover Removal for the Buick 3800 series II engine in the front wheel drive engine application. Replacing Valve cover Gasket for L67 and L32 V6 engine with a Plastic valve cover.Chech Plastic Valve Cover for Warp-age before replacing its Gasket. Chevy(2004 yr)Impala 3800 series II engine PLEASE - RATE -COMMENT AND SUBSCRIBE THANK YOU


 


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Chevy Impala 3800 series II - How to bleeding engine cooling system.4/4 (2004 yr)
Bleeding the cooling system on the 3800 Series II engine.The application is the same for Supercharger and Non-Supercharge engine.here you will SEE how to remove all air bubble and pocket ,which always contribute to a over-heating engine.





Chevy Impala 3800 series II - How to replace a Thermostat. (2004 yr) 1/4
Watch the video to learn how to replace the Thermostat on a car and other coolant leaks.Repairing a over heated coolant system on 04 Chevy impala 3800 series II engine.





How to Clean a throttle body - GM 3800 throttle Body Tune-Up - Cable accelerator type
Part of a engine tune-up process,to promote ideal air flow at idle for smooth control. Here we inspect the throttle blade shaft bushing for air-leaks.HOW-TO clean a throttle body. L67 vs I36 Throttle Body: http://crzyz28.sytes.net/mycars/2004montess/projects/L67_TB/L67_TB.html





Buick (2000 yr) Park Ave 3800 series II engine(exposing the effect of defected engine mount).
The broken front mount on the make and model will also cause damage to the CV-axle joint and transmission differential .This video show the effect of a broken mount inside a 2000 yr Buick Park Ave front engine/transmission mount.This application is the same(1997-2006)for Park Ave Ultra(supercharge) Pontiac Bonneville.All H-Body.How to replace engine mount for Front wheel drive cars. How find a bad engine mount. How to find a damage motor mount. How to identify a damage engine mount?. How to find a damage engine mount on a car?. Why is my car slow at acceleration?. why does the car engine jump when placed into gear?.





Impala - Rear Valve Cover Gasket replacement (3800 Series II)
This is how you change the rear valve cover gasket on a Chevy Impala 3.8L (3800 Series II). The method used in this video is WITHOUT taking off the fuel rail and fuel injectors and plenum. This present a problem with a tricky bolt that's next to the fuel injector. You don't necessarily save time doing it this way as opposed to removing the Plenum and fuel rail/injectors but it's less hassle if you're worried about seating the injectors back into place and everything. It will take you some time to get one of the 13mm bolts out that's next to the second injector in the back. Also this method was attempting to get the valve cover off without removing the alternator and tensioner assembly. There is not enough clearance to lift the cover off without removing it. So go ahead and remove the tensioner assembly... 1. Disconnect Neg Terminal from the battery (8mm) 2. Remove the plastic cover by twisting off the oil cap piece 3. Remove the rear "brace bar" (black bar going from left to right) two 13mm on each side 4. Remove the Coolant Recovery tank and set aside (two 10mm nuts) 5. Remove the alternator 6. Remove the bracket holding the alternator to the engine by the fuel injector (10mm I believe) 7. Remove the tensioner assembly (Three 15mm bolts, one of them is hidden) 8. Remove 6 valve cover bolts (10mm) Follow in reverse order to re-assemble, use Permatex Medium blue loctite on the the bolts for the valve cover, you can also change the grommets, but it's not necessary. (They are only $10 for both front and back valve covers)





Impala - Valve Cover Gasket Replacement (Front) 3800 Series II
This is how to replace the Front Valve Cover Gasket on the 2002 Chevy Impala 3.8L (3800 Series II) This is a fairly simple job, to do this you will need the following Tools: 1. Socket & Ratchet set including 10mm, 13mm, and 15mm 2. Valve Cover Gasket Replacement by Felpro ( Part Number: VS50080R) $14.99 at autozone 3. RTV Black by Permatex (Part Number: 82180) (not necessary but nice to have) 4. Torque Wrench that reads Inch/Pounds NOT Foot pounds. Harbor Freight has them for ($10-$15) (Harbor Freight Tools Part #2696) The one at harbor freight is 1/4 drive so if you have a 3/8 inch socket set get a universal adapter set for about $4. 5. Alcohol, acetone, or brake parts cleaner 6. Toothbrush to scrub the valve cover where the gasket will sit This whole job can be done for less than $50 including the cost of the torque wrench. I was quoted about $250 just to change the front valve cover gasket by a local shop.





Fixing A Car That Smokes Under The Hood
Scotty Kilmer. mechanic for the last 45 years, shows how you can fix your car if smoke is coming out from under the hood. Leaking oil on the Exhaust often does causes smoke to appear as the oil hits the Exhaust, and you can easily fix it yourself if you know what to look for.





How To Replace The Intake Tensioner Coolant Elbow 1992-99 Buick Lesabre
http://www.1aauto.com/1A/HeaterHoses/Buick/LeSabre/1AEMX00112 If you are slowly loosing coolant look at the passenger side of your engine between the coils and alternator. You will see a small plastic elbow that is prone to cracking and gasket or O ring failure. If your engine antifreeze is leaking from this location you will need to replace your coolant elbow. This video is applicable to the Buick LeSabre, years 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, and 99.





Oil Pan Replacement Pontiac Grand Prix GM 3800 Engine Buick Chevrolet
Oil Pan Replacement GM3800 Engine This is how I replaced the rusted out oil pan on my 2000 Pontiac Grand Prix with GM L67 3800 Series II Supercharged engine. The same applies for the non supercharged L36 3800. *** I am not a mechanic and have no training whatsoever. I am not responsible if you follow the explanations in this video and damage parts or incorrectly install a component or cause injury to yourself or somebody else. Major engine components, such as oil pans, should only be changed by a qualified professional and this video is for entertainment purposes only. ***





How to use RTV and properly make a gasket
Learn how to use RTV to make a rear differential gasket, waterpump gasket, oil pan gasket, thermostat gasket, valve cover gasket, or whatever needs a gasket but you cant find a gasket. Using this method will help make sure you seal whatever you are working on, properly. If you dont use the RTV gasket maker correctly then you can get a leak and all that hard work was for nothing. Tags How to Change Fluid in Rear Differential, How to Change Rear Differential Gasket, How to Change Fluid in Rear Differential : How to Change Rear Differential Gasket, silicon, RTV, rvt, trv, rtv gasket, rtv valve cover, how remove gasket, cylinder head gasket, loctite rtv silicone, loctite, rtv vs gasket, black rtv silicone, high temp rtv, high temperature rtv, change differential fluid, oil pan gasket, red rtv, gasket making, pontiac vibe, windshield repair, head gasket, rtv silicone gasket, rtv gasket, room temperature vulcanizing, rubber gasket, rubber gasket maker, gasket maker, rtv silicon, chrisfix, chris fix, Disclaimer: Due to factors beyond the control of ChrisFix, it cannot guarantee against unauthorized modifications of this information, or improper use of this information. ChrisFix assumes no liability for property damage or injury incurred as a result of any of the information contained in this video. ChrisFix recommends safe practices when working with power tools, automotive lifts, lifting tools, jack stands, electrical equipment, blunt instruments, chemicals, lubricants, or any other tools or equipment seen or implied in this video. Due to factors beyond the control of ChrisFix, no information contained in this video shall create any express or implied warranty or guarantee of any particular result. Any injury, damage or loss that may result from improper use of these tools, equipment, or the information contained in this video is the sole responsibility of the user and not ChrisFix.





How To Replace The Head Gasket and Intake Manifold Gaskets On A GM 3800 Engine
In this walkthrough I replace the head gaskets, upper intake manifold (UIM) gaskets, and lower intake manifold (LIM) gaskets on a 1997 pontiac bonneville. These steps will be identical for almost any GM 3800 / 3400 / 3100 series II motor. If you have any questions feel free to post them on the video and I'll do my best to try to help! Here is a link to the the text walkthrough I used as a guide for making this video: http://www.w-body.com/showthread.php/49858-Any-info-on-changing-series-2-38 00-head-gaskets Also here's a list of torque specs for most of the motor: Camshaft Bolt: 74 ft/lbs + 90 degrees angle torque Camshaft thrust plate: 132 in/lbs (T30 torx) Front cover bolts: 15 ft/lbs + 40 degrees angle torque Oil pan bolts: 125 in/lbs Crank sensor nuts: 18 ft/lbs Camshaft sensor bolts 48 in/lbs Lifter hold-downs: 22 ft/lbs Rocker bolts: 11 ft/lbs(132in/lbs) + 90 degrees angle torque Lower intake bolts: 132 in/lbs Supercharger bolts: 17ft/lbs Crank Bolt: 111 ft/lbs + 76 degrees angle torque up to 10/98 111 ft/lbs +114 degrees angle torque 10/98 and up Cylinder head bolts: 37 ft/lbs + 130 degrees + 30 degrees up to 10/98 37 ft/lbs + 120 degrees Flywheel/flexplate bolts: 132 in/lbs + 50 degrees Exhaust manifolds: stud/nuts 132 in/lbs Nuts 156 in/lbs Oil filter adapter to timing cover: 22 ft/lbs 97 earlier 132 in/lbs + 50 degrees 97 and later Oil pump Cover to timing cover: 98 in/lbs Pick up tube and screen: 132 in/lbs Valve cover bolts: 89 in/lbs Tstat bolts: 21 ft/lbs Water Pump: 132 in/lbs + 80 degrees Water pump pulley: 115 in/lbs Throttle body: 84-89 in/lbs Fuel rail nuts: 75-84 in/lbs





Buick - Engine Noise and Repair Techniques (1993)
This video, taken from Buick's Know-how Series (KH-168), discusses engine noise and repair techniques for early 90's Series 3300/3800 engines. Topics covered include: general repair tips, noise diagnosis for knocking/ticking, and piston pin rattle.





Engine Coolant Thermostat replacement 3800 V6 engine - Pontiac Bonneville P0128 OBD II Code repair
My check engine light came on in the fall of '09 so I had the code pulled. It was P0128- Coolant Thermostat (Coolant Temperature Below Thermostat Regulating Temperature). I decided to check and replace the thermostat. It was the problem and has been fine since. Overall the job took about 45 min to 1 hour including draining, warming the engine, and refilling the cooling system. It was a pretty easy fix. This problem causes the engine to run too cool because the thermostat is stuck open, causing more coolant to go through the radiator than necessary. Ignoring this problem causes the fuel mixture to be too rich, which will cause poor fuel economy.





3800 Lower Intake fix
Just some nuggets of wisdom for fixing a leaking lower intake gasket on a GM 3.8L Series 2 V6.





Valve Cover Modification and Polishing
Crankcase ventilation in a nutshell: High cylinder pressures are achieved both on the compression and combustion strokes. As gasses are compressed and exploded, the rings do the best they can with extremely close tolerances (and oil) to hold all that pressure in... but some still makes it past the rings. That's called blow-by. Blow-by is why all combustion engines are inefficient by design, and why they have crankcase breather systems. Blow-by contains air, water (humidity), fuel, carbon and nitrogen. You don't really want all that stuff in your oil, as they all contribute to oil viscosity breakdown. A breather system works to extract those gasses from the crankcase so they don't condensate into the oil. It does this by connecting the car's air intake system to the crankcase so that blow-by can be re-burnt and transformed into oxides that the catalytic converter can easily break down. As an engine gets worn, the physical capability of the rings to hold that pressure in is reduced. This results in more blow-by and higher crankcase pressure. High crankcase pressure is bad because it prevents the rings from sealing properly, and can also blow oil seals like valve cover gaskets, front case and rear main seals, etc... as that air tries to escape. This is a fire hazard. Oil burns and it's hard to put out. One of the most common tell-tale signs of high crankcase pressure on a DSM is having to zip-tie your dipstick down. If it's getting blown out, then there's excess pressure pushing it out because it has nowhere to go. Also, on an engine that's holding higher crankcase pressure, that pressure works against your oil pressure, and reduces oil flow to all points in the oil system. The factory DSM crankcase has 2 ventilation systems. Two. One is a PCV system (Positive Crankcase Ventilation), and the other one is just a simple breather. The PCV system is connected to the intake manifold, and the breather is connected to the air intake in front of the turbo (or anywhere on the intake in front of the throttle plate on non-turbo cars). The PCV valve is designed to CLOSE OFF the port between the crankcase and the intake manifold when the engine is under load (Boost). When higher pressure is in the intake than the crankcase, a valve snaps shut preventing you from Boosting your crankcase. When you are at idle/cruise (vacuum), it pops open letting those gasses get vacuumed out of the crankcase. Vacuum. The breather always vents back into the intake pre-turbo or pre-throttle plate. That airway is always open. Neither port on either the PCV or the breather are bigger than 1/4", so as much air as you can fit through a single 1/4" hole when you're under Boost... that's all the blow-by it can extract from the crankcase. That might be fine for an 11 PSI factory car, but when some tweaker wants to flow 30, 40, 50+ pounds of Boost, this is a system which is frequently overlooked and in desperate need of attention. You might as well look at your Boost controller as a blow-by increaser if that makes any sense. You gotta get those gasses out of the crankcase. Crankcase pressure is bad. I'm not going to cover vacuum pumps, venturis or other methods of creating vacuum pressure in the crank case because these advanced techniques are for racing applications with dry-sump oil systems which DSMs do not have from the factory, and few people need. Aside from the rings, only worn valve seals can contribute to high crankcase pressure, and that usually causes increased oil consumption that's visible (oil smoke) on cold starts and as the car rolls into high Boost after long periods of vacuum. Some people have tools that can allow them to change the valve seals without removing the cylinder head (if the rings are known to be good), but that's far more time consuming and less complete of a fix than removing and rebuilding the cylinder head. If the rings and cylinder bores are in bad shape, then it's a waste of money. Someone who's performed compression and leak-down tests has determined which parts are bad already. As far as the rest goes, I bypassed my PCV system entirely. There is no vacuum scavenging of gasses from the crankcase on my car. It eliminates the chance of a PCV valve failing and Boosting my crankcase, and since I have a catch can, excessive blow-by is still being captured through condensation. I installed two 3/8" breather ports which flows more than 8 times the air that the original ones could flow. That should prevent pressure from ever building up. The -8AN fittings are compression fittings that don't require gaskets and are extremely easy to work with. They create an airtight seal to my Greddy catch can which I had modified to accept 2 extra fittings. One is plugged. The other has a 5/8" line to the turbine intake to extract gasses back to the engine like it was originally designed to do.




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