Uganda's Moonshine Epidemic

Ugandans are the hardest drinking Africans in the motherland, both in terms of per capita consumption and the hooch they choose to chug. Waregi, or "war gin," is what they call the local moonshine, and it makes the harshest Appalachian rotgut taste like freaking Bailey's. Watch the uncensored "Preparation of the Goat" video here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_4GZDWk_xtQ Hosted by Thomas Morton Follow Thomas on Twitter here: https://twitter.com/@BabyBalls69 Check out more VICE documentaries: http://bit.ly/VICE-Documentaries Subscribe for videos that are actually good: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE Check out our full video catalog: http://www.youtube.com/user/vice/videos Videos, daily editorial and more: http://vice.com Like VICE on Facebook: http://fb.com/vice Follow VICE on Twitter: http://twitter.com/vice Read our tumblr: http://vicemag.tumblr.com

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The Gun Markets of Pakistan
In 2006, Suroosh Alvi was one of a handful of journalists who was able to get into the massive guns market in Pakistan's tribal areas -- home base for the Taliban since the U.S. invasion of Afghanistan in 2001. He returned to Pakistan this month and found the entire country was a "powder keg ready to explode." To see where VICE goes to next, check out: http://www.vice.com/the-vice-guide-to-travel





Prostitutes of God (Documentary)
Like VICE News? Subscribe to our news channel: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News Some parents in India practice the Devadasi tradition, selling their daughters into a life of prostitution, often around the age of 10. Watch more VICE documentaries here: http://bit.ly/VICE-Documentaries We traveled to the Indian city of Sangli to meet a group of bolshy sex workers selling their bodies in the name of the Hindu Goddess Yellamma. Local sex worker Anitha invites us for lunch in her brothel; shows us her homemade "sex rooms," and tells us what it's like to be a religious prostitute in modern India. Afterwards we cross the border into Karnataka into the heartlands of the ancient Devadasi tradition to uncover the mystery of the Goddess Yellamma, and find out how a religious icon became a justification for child prostitution. We meet two teenage Devadasis, Mala and Belavva, to talk sex, saris, and how they cope with the deadly threat of HIV. A dancing transvestite Devadasi steals the limelight in the next phase of our journey, as we travel deeper into the murky world of temple prostitution. He invites us for chai, gives our host a manicure, and teaches us a few tricks of the trade. We explore the home of the most celebrated Devadasi brothel madam in the business to find out how she lures the next generation of girls into the sex trade. For the grand finale we went to the annual full moon festival in Saundatti, the most prestigious event in the Devadasi calendar. The colour, dancing and celebrations of the festival disguise the darkness of its underlying purpose: child sex trafficking. Here traffickers, pimps and brothel madams come from all over India to recruit young girls and boys into the sex trade in the name of the Goddess Yellamma. On our way home, we are invited to a remote mud hut to meet two older Devadasi women a mother and daughter who reflect back on their lives and ask the question: what kind of religion turns parents into pimps and their children into prostitutes? Subscribe for videos that are actually good: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE Check out our full video catalog: http://www.youtube.com/user/vice/videos Videos, daily editorial and more: http://vice.com Like VICE on Facebook: http://fb.com/vice Follow VICE on Twitter: http://twitter.com/vice Read our tumblr: http://vicemag.tumblr.com





Swaziland: Gold Mine of Marijuana (Part 1/2)
Check out more episodes of Hamilton's Pharmacopeia here: http://bit.ly/1p4lfu9 Swaziland is a landlocked country sandwiched between South Africa and Mozambique. Despite Swaziland's small size, it boasts more hectares of land dedicated to growing Cannabis than all of India. It is also home to Swazi Gold, the legendary sativa strain. Hamilton Morris travels to Swaziland hoping to chemically analyze the cannabinoids present in some of the local strains. Instead, he finds a country steeped in political corruption and economic turmoil. Cannabis is viewed by many growers, users, and politicians as a drug that will cause insanity, but it may be Swaziland's only hope for economic stability. Check out the Best of VICE here: http://bit.ly/VICE-Best-Of Subscribe to VICE here! http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE Check out our full video catalog: http://bit.ly/VICE-Videos Videos, daily editorial and more: http://vice.com Like VICE on Facebook: http://fb.com/vice Follow VICE on Twitter: http://twitter.com/vice Read our tumblr: http://vicemag.tumblr.com





Mexican Oil and Drug Cartels: Cocaine & Crude (Full Length)
Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News VICE founder Suroosh Alvi travels to Mexico to see the effects of cartel oil theft firsthand. Mexico’s notoriously violent drug cartels are diversifying. Besides trafficking narcotics, extorting businesses, and brutally murdering their rivals, cartels are now at work exploiting their country’s precious number one export: oil. Every day as many as 10,000 barrels of crude oil are stolen from Mexico’s state-run oil company, Pemex, through precarious illegal taps, which are prone to deadly accidents. Pemex estimates that it loses $5 billion annually in stolen oil, some of which ends up being sold over the border in US gas stations. As police fight the thieves, and the cartels fight each other, the number of victims caught in the battle for the pipelines continues to climb. Follow Suroosh Alvi on Twitter: @SurooshAlvi Watch "Bomb Trains: The Crude Gamble of Oil by Rail: http://bit.ly/1k5C8YM Part 1: http://bit.ly/1nRvExR Part 2: http://bit.ly/1oeGurQ Part 3: http://bit.ly/1rWLede Check out the VICE News beta for more: http://vicenews.com Follow VICE News here: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/




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