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SUPER FAST Piasecki X 49A Helicopter for US Military
Helicopter The Piasecki X-49 is a four-bladed, twin-engined, experimental compound helicopter under development by Piasecki Aircraft. The X-49A is based on the airframe of a Sikorsky YSH-60F Seahawk, but utilizes Piasecki's proprietary vectored thrust ducted propeller (VTDP) design and includes the addition of lifting wings. The concept of the experimental program is to apply the VTDP technology to a production military helicopter to determine any benefit gained through increases in performance or useful load. "SpeedHawk" is a concept aircraft[1] based on applying X-49A compounding concepts to a production UH-60 Black Hawk offering better performance, range, and increases in useful load. The "SpeedHawk" aircraft includes an SPU (third engine), high forward-swept wing concept, a 45 inch cabin extending fuselage "plug", and several other drag reducing and performance-oriented improvements, including a rotorhead fairing, landing gear streamlining, and a fly-by-wire flight control system. The U.S. Navy-sponsored project worth US$26.1 million consists of a Sikorsky YSH-60F helicopter modified by Piasecki as a testbed to validate the "Vectored Thrust Ducted Propeller" (VTDP) system. One YSH-60F was converted to test the feasibility of VTDP under an advanced technology demonstration program. The YSH-60F is powered by two General Electric T700-GE-701C engines. The demonstration contract was awarded on by the Naval Air Systems Command to Piasecki Aircraft. Piasecki installed a lifting wing with flaperons and a vectored-thrust ducted propeller (VTDP) to a U.S. Navy Sikorsky YSH-60F.[2] The compound helicopter technology added to the YSH-60F was first demonstrated in trials of the Piasecki 16H-1 and 16H-1A in the early 1960s, when the helicopters were flown at speeds up to 225 mph (360 km/h). The success of the Pathfinder inspired others to experiment with compounding, resulting in programs such as the AH-56 Cheyenne. In May 2003, the YSH-60F/VTDP demonstrator was redesignated the X-49A'.[3] During 2004, the X-49A VTDP program was transitioned from the US Navy to the US Army.[4] Piasecki planned to use the vectored-thrust ducted propeller design of the X-49 for their entry in the Future Vertical Lift program,[5] but were not chosen to take part in the Joint Multi-Role Technology Demonstrator (JMR-TD) phase.[6] The X-49A flight demonstrator is being developed with funding from the US Army's Aviation Applied Technology Directorate to demonstrate the ability to increase the speed of existing helicopters to 200 kt (360 km/h) or more.[7] The flight demonstrator has been updated with a lifting wing taken from an Aerostar FJ-100 business jet. A ring tail has been added and the helicopter drive train modified to accommodate VTDP. Piasecki conducted integrated tests of the modified drive train at the Navy's helicopter transmission test facility. The wings are intended to produce lift to offload the rotor so the rotor can be slowed down and produce less drag, allowing for higher speed.[8] The cockpit controls are modified with the addition of a manual prop pitch override on the collective for the ring tail. This is the only visible change to the aircraft's existing mechanical controls in the cockpit. The other controls needed to operate the compound helicopter's systems are integrated into the aircraft's existing mechanical controls to reduce pilot workload. The weight added to the X-49A demonstrator aircraft is estimated at about 1,600 lb (725 kg) due to the requirement[citation needed] to not modify the existing mechanical control system. The X-49A made its first flight on June 29, 2007[9] for 15 minutes at Boeing's New Castle County (KILG) flight test center.[10] This flight included hovering, pedal turns, and slow forwards and sideways flight using the VTDP for anti-torque, directional and trim control. The X-49A has completed its initial testing phase, and is continuing with further testing of the technology.[citation needed] Since then, it has flown over 80 flight events with more than 80 total hours logged.[citation needed] A helicopter is a type of rotorcraft in which lift and thrust are supplied by rotors. This allows the helicopter to take off and land vertically, to hover, and to fly forward, backward, and laterally. These attributes allow helicopters to be used in congested or isolated areas where fixed-wing aircraft would usually not be able to take off or land. The capability to hover efficiently for extended periods of time allows a helicopter to accomplish tasks that fixed-wing aircraft and other forms of vertical takeoff and landing aircraft cannot perform. The word helicopter is adapted from the French language hélicoptère, coined by Gustave Ponton d'Amécourt in 1861, which originates from the Greek helix/helik- (ἕλιξ) "twisted, curved"[1] and pteron (πτερόν) "wing".[2][3][4] English-language nicknames for helicopter include "chopper", "helo", "heli" and "whirlybird".





RC BIG SCALE Helicopter CH53 Heer RC
CH53 mit 6 Blatt Rotorkopf und Pahl-Turbine





WORLD CHAMPION RC Helicopter pilot Demonstrates his Awesome Skills
Radio-controlled helicopters (also RC helicopters) are model aircraft which are distinct from RC airplanes because of the differences in construction, aerodynamics, and flight training. Several basic designs of RC helicopters exist, of which some (such as those with collective BOOK PROMOTION: MODEL AIRPLANE SECRETS CLICK HERE http://6d39f91ij18-jqaby0l9sbe8uf.hop.clickbank.net/ pitch, meaning blades which rotate on their longitudinal axis to vary or reverse lift so the pitch can be altered and can therefore change the angle of attack) are more maneuverable than others. The more maneuverable designs are often harder to fly, but benefit from greater aerobatic capabilities. Flight controls allow pilots to control the collective and throttle (usually linked together), the cyclic controls (pitch and roll), and the tail rotor (yaw). Controlling these in unison enables the helicopter to perform most[citation needed] of the same maneuvres as full-sized helicopters, such as hovering and backwards flight, and many that full-sized helicopters cannot, such as inverted flight (where collective pitch control provides negative blade pitch to hold heli up inverted, and pitch/yaw controls must be reversed by pilot). The various helicopter controls are effected by means of small servo motors, commonly known as servos. A piezoelectric gyroscope is typically used on the tail rotor (yaw) control to counter wind- and torque-reaction-induced tail movement. This "gyro" does not itself apply a mechanical force, but electronically adjusts the control signal to the tail rotor servo. The engines typically used to be methanol-powered two-stroke motors, but electric brushless motors combined with a high-performance lithium polymer battery (or lipo) are now more common and provide improved efficiency, performance and lifespan compared to brushed motors, while decreasing prices bring them within reach of hobbyists. Gasoline and jet turbine engines are also used.[1] A helicopter is a type of rotorcraft in which lift and thrust are supplied by rotors. This allows the helicopter to take off and land vertically, to hover, and to fly forwards, backwards, and laterally. These attributes allow helicopters to be used in congested or isolated areas where fixed-wing aircraft would usually not be able to take off or land. The capability to hover efficiently for extended periods of time allows a helicopter to accomplish tasks that fixed-wing aircraft and other forms of vertical takeoff and landing aircraft cannot perform. The word helicopter is adapted from the French language hélicoptère, coined by Gustave de Ponton d'Amecourt in 1861, which originates from the Greek helix/helik- (ἕλιξ) = "twisted, curved"[1] and pteron (πτερόν) = "wing".[2][3][4] Nicknames used for helicopters include chopper, helo or whirlybird. Helicopters were developed and built during the first half-century of flight, with the Focke-Wulf Fw 61 being the first operational helicopter in 1936. Some helicopters reached limited production, but it was not until 1942 that a helicopter designed by Igor Sikorsky reached full-scale production,[5] with 131 aircraft built.[6] Though most earlier designs used more than one main rotor, it is the single main rotor with anti-torque tail rotor configuration that has become the most common helicopter configuration. Tandem rotor helicopters are also in widespread use due to their greater payload capacity. Quadrotor helicopters and other types of multicopter have been developed for specialized applications.





Alan Szabo Jr. Evo IX RS 10.0 @ 142mph 4/9/2010
www.facebook.com/alanszabojrfans I drove this car 60 miles round trip to the track and back. It was on Hoosier DOT drag radials. Motor is a buschur stage 3 2.3L with Full Race Exhaust manifold andHTA86 turbo and buschwacker transmission.





Russian Helicopters Swarm over Ukraine
Russian Helicopter Swarms over Ukraine 2014, Putin fills the sky with even more helicopter gunships, looks like the invasion has already started





Kirsty, Day 2 with Trex 600
I finally took the plunge & started with forward flight, this is getting very addictive, 2 batteries in one day ;)))





How to Fly RC Heli Lesson 1-6
http://onlyflyingmachines.com http://onlyflyingmachines.com/product-category/multirotors/ http://onlyflyingmachines.com/product-category/pnp_fpv_combos/ After a long time, hehehe How to fly RC Heli for beginners, 6 Channel helis lessons are here. In fact these are just few methods I used when I started with Helis and I did not have any RC Simulator. Simulators like Realflight G3.5 make great difference and you learn to fly Helis or planes in a week and become pro in a month, but if you do not have RC Sims, then it takes lots of patience and lots of practice. Here are first 6 lessons for those who do not have RC Simulators but do have RC helis so with patience and practice you will get there. Enjoy.





Porsche 911 Turbo Review - Top Gear - BBC
With their engines mounted at the back, the Porsche 911 has always been a scary car. But things have just got scarier as Jeremy steps into the Porsche 911 turbo. Spare a thought too for the Stig as he wrestles the turbo around a seriously wet track on a power lap. Subscribe for more awesome Top Gear videos: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=Topgear Top Gear YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/topgear TopGear.com website: http://www.topgear.com Top Gear Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/topgear Top Gear Twitter: http://twitter.com/BBC_topgear This is a channel from BBC Worldwide who help fund new BBC programmes.





Flooded engine and changing glow plug of outrage VELOCITY 50
Flooded engine and changing glow plug of outrage VELOCITY 50





E-flite Blade 450 3D RC Heli RTF Demo Flight
The Blade 450 3D RTF blasts ready-to-fly 3D heli performance to new levels of precision and power. It comes completely assembled and equipped for aggressive 3D aerobatics with the kind of pro-class electronics and mechanics you would expect to find in more expensive kits that take hours to build. It's even been flight tested and had the rotors balanced at the factory so you don't have to do any setup. Simply charge its 3S 2200mAh 30C Li-Po battery and fly. Also available in BNF version. Available at www.hobbyhobby.com http://hobbyhobby.com/store/product/318877/Blade-450-3D-RTF/




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