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Trans Am Paddock '66-'72 Sights & Sounds

Happy July 4th! If you have speakers plugged into your computer, turn it up. Hopefully you have a subwoofer, too! This footage is me walking through Vic Edelbrock's collection of vintage Trans-Am racecars as they're being prepared for the Group 7A races and enjoying the sights and sounds... The Trans-Am Series is an automobile racing series which was created in 1966 by Sports Car Club of America (SCCA). This was the proving ground for all American manufacturers to compete with race-modified production cars. It ran until 1972 when at the height of Richard Nixon's incompetence dealing with OPEC, we had a gas shortage which was compounded by an embargo levied against us. Syria, Egypt and Tunisia didn't really like Nixon re-feuling their arch-enemy, Israel. Rather than address the shortage, the auto industry was heavily regulated to curb consumption. Further restrictions placed on the oil industry by an other rocket surgeon, Jimmy Carter, left us unable to further develop our own oil supplies which cemented these changes to the auto industry. These events changed muscle cars as we knew them into complete turds for over a decade while US auto makers struggled with the regulations and re-learned how to produce decent cars again... but for the "pony cars", it was the beginning of the end. The oil embargo of 1973 changed the shape of not only the auto industry, but all forms of auto racing to follow. You used to be able to afford these cars. I remember when... back when I was in high school... But it's 2010 now. This race celebrates all the classic cars you've dreamed of owning or being seen in. These things auction in the 6+ figures now (because of their race history). Enjoy this parade of '60's and early '70's model Ford Mustangs, Chevrolet Camaros, Plymouth Barracudas, Mercury Cougars, AMC Javelins, Pontiac Firebirds, and Dodge Challengers. This event required that they be in their original race condition in order to run with the Group 7A cars, so the contest to follow is all about how much compression these 40+ year old cars have left, and who's driving it. These beauties have been meticulously preserved by the best collectors, engineers and mechanics in the industry. I hope you guys can appreciate it because this is off my normal subject material. I just wanted to change things up and post something American on Independence day. This one's for the Veterans.


 


More Videos...


Trans Am-Jim Hague '71 Javelin-Sept 25-27, 2009
Historic Trans Am group at the HMSA Coronado "Classic" Speed Festival, Coronado (San Diego) CA.. Jim Hague , in the #2 '71 AMC Javelin, battles for 1st place the entire race, in what turned out to be a 1-2-3 all-Javelin finish. Clip is 1st 9 min of race #2...video courtesy of ManiMotorsports





Trans-Am Group 7A Race at Laguna Seca
Pardon the shakes. I traveled 3200 miles to see this and I don't carry a tripod on this trek. I've cut out some of the panning, but how often do you get to see these kinds of cars actually racing the way they were intended to be raced? Enjoy the thoroughbreds! 2010 Rolex Monterey Motorsports Reunion Final standings... 1 77 Ken Epsman Saratoga, CA 1970 Dodge Challenger 5000cc 8 01:40.792 4 2 2 Jim Hague Saratoga, CA 1971 AMC Javelin 5000cc 8 01:41.757 3 3 64 Chad Raynal San Jose, CA 1969 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28 5000cc 7 01:42.643 7 4 102 2-Bruce Canepa Scotts Valley, CA 1969 Ford Mustang 4949cc 5 01:42.888 5 5 22 Gary Goeringer Nipomo, CA 1968 Ford Mustang 5000cc 7 01:43.398 2 6 113 13-Tomy Drissi Los Angeles, CA 1970 Chevrolet Camaro 4998cc 7 01:43.527 6 7 28 Gregory Weirick Malibu, CA 1970 Chevrolet Camaro 5000cc 7 01:44.253 6 8 57 Forrest Straight Mountain View, CA 1970 Ford Boss 302 Mustang 5000cc 6 01:44.370 2 9 42 Andy Boone Laguna Beach, CA 1970 Plymouth Barracuda 4983cc 7 01:44.447 4 10 201 1-Dan Walters Morgan Hill, CA 1972 AMC Javelin 5000cc 6 01:44.664 5 11 5 Michael Eisenberg Northridge, CA 1963 Ford Falcon Sprint 4737cc 7 01:44.996 3 12 45 Ken Adams Gilroy, CA 1969 Ford Boss 302 Mustang 4949cc 7 01:45.106 3 13 48 Craig H. Jackson Scottsdale, AZ 1970 Plymouth Barracuda 5000cc 7 01:45.120 7 14 71 Jeffrey H. Stout Manhattan Beach, CA 1970 Chevrolet Camaro 5000cc 7 01:45.121 5 15 1 Jim Click Tucson, AZ 1969 Ford Boss 302 Mustang 4998cc 5 01:45.172 3 16 30 Arthur Miller Santa Barbara, CA 1967 Chevrolet Camaro 5000cc 7 01:45.181 5 17 128 28-Nick DeVitis Sammamish, WA 1968 Ford Mustang 4949cc 7 01:45.766 3 18 15 Patrick S. Ryan Asheville, NC 1967 Chevrolet Camaro 5000cc 7 01:45.793 5 19 11 Stephen Sorenson Morgan Hill, CA 1970 Chevrolet Camaro 5000cc 7 01:46.401 6 20 215 15-Daniel Lipetz Vancouver, BC 1970 Ford Boss 302 Mustang 4950cc 6 01:47.353 3 21 41 Robert Canepa Diablo, CA 1970 Ford Boss 302 Mustang 5000cc 6 01:47.380 4 22 115 15-Brian Ferrin Sonoma, CA 1970 Ford Boss 302 Mustang 5000cc 7 01:47.946 5 23 89 Allen Denson Orange, CA 1966 Ford Mustang 4736cc 7 01:48.282 5 24 25 Craig Conley Rancho Santa Fe, CA 1970 Ford Boss 302 Mustang 5000cc 7 01:48.617 6 25 72 John Kiland Henderson, NV 1969 Chevrolet Camaro 5000cc 7 01:48.672 7 26 13 Christi Edelbrock Torrance, CA 1968 Chevrolet Camaro 5000cc 7 01:48.882 6 27 83 Gordon Gimbel Roseville, CA 1969 Ford Boss 302 Mustang 5000cc 7 01:49.262 5 28 67 John Linfesty Santa Monica, CA 1968 Chevrolet Camaro 4998cc 7 01:49.349 7 29 116 16-Donald Lee Portola Valley, CA 1968 Chevrolet Camaro 5000cc 7 01:49.566 6 30 16 Vic Edlebrock Torrance, CA 1969 Ford Boss 302 Mustang 5000cc 5 01:50.138 3 31 7 Tony Hart Moorpark, CA 1967 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28 5000cc 7 01:50.415 6 32 96 Ron Tribble Roseburg, OR 1967 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28 5000cc 7 01:51.430 7 33 248 48-Roger Williams San Diego, CA 1970 Chevrolet Camaro 5000cc 3 01:53.671 2 34 101 1-Jimmy Castle, Jr. Monterey, CA 1970 Chevrolet Camaro 5000cc 5 01:53.859 3 35 216 16-A. Ross Myers Boyertown, PA 1970 Ford Mustang 4998cc 7 01:55.118 7 36 202 2-William L. Ockerlu Holland, MI 1968 Ford Mustang 5000cc 7 01:55.545 3 37 78 Michael S. Martin San Juan Capistrano, C1970 Ford Boss 302 Mustang 4949cc 6 01:58.237 5 38 6 Tom McIntyre Burbank, CA 1968 Chevrolet Camaro 5000cc 39 31 Walt Boeninger Saratoga, CA 1967 Shelby Trans Am 4998cc 40 56 Tomy Drissi Northridge, CA 1967 Chevrolet Camaro 5000cc 41 98 Chris Liebenberg Boyertown, PA 1967 Mercury Cougar 4998cc 42 111 11-Norman Daniels Vancouver, WA 1968 Chevrolet Camaro 5000cc 43 148 48-Lance Smith San Diego, CA 1970 Chevrolet Camaro 5000cc





Mont Tremblant Vintage Trans Am racing
July 9, 2011 http://www.lecircuit.com/index.cfm





The History of the Trans-Am Series
A look back on the histroy of the Trans-Am Series from 1966 to 1995. This program was aired back in 1996 on Speedvision.





1969 Penske Trans-Am Camaro
The 1969 Sunoco Camaro championship winning car. Driven by Mark Donohue the entire 1969 Trans-Am Season. It won six races and finished second in another two. The sister car, driven by Ronnie Bucknum finished 3rd in the Championship, and was later destroyed by an earthquake in Mexico.





NASCAR of Yesteryears
Remember when you could recognize a NASCAR chassis? Back when they used production cars? Be nice to these old ladies... They're packin'. Don't let the drum brakes fool ya.





Boost Leak Testing 203: Injector Seal Leaks
We're not talking about fuel, but my solution happens on that side of the rail. Like blaming a failing alternator, don't blame the lower seals if they leak. This concept for solving Boost or vacuum leaks applies to nearly every of fuel injected car out there. More so when any of them that are forced-induction. This is how I fix it on my DSMs. There are THREE seals on a DSM injector. A fuel o-ring, a lower injector seal, and an upper seal which applies pressure to the lower seal. It's a spacer. If the upper seal fails, the lower ones don't work. If the lower seals aren't hard as nails, they're probably not at fault if you have Boost leaks. I said it in the video... RTV isn't for everything.





Cameron Lawrence Racing Trans-Am Road America 2014
Cameron Lawrence driving the #1 Miller Racing Chevrolet Camaro TA2 at Road America with Trans-Am. Qualified 1st but fell back to 3rd in the opening laps. Luckily was able to work my way back to the lead after a few cautions and hard, close racing. Toughest race to date and very exciting so hope you all enjoy.





1970 Trans-Am Year in Review
Best year of Trans-Am racing!!





1988 Trans-Am Lime Rock Park
Coverage of the SCCA Escort Trans-Am race run on 8/6/88 by Steve and Brock on the good old American Sports Calavcade. Man I loved this show back then.





Hyundai Assembly 4 - Balancing Rods
I edited this video to its finished state, and RojoDelChocolate handed me a track with no collaboration that was the right length and rhythm. I literally did nothing to the video once the audio track was dropped in, and that's just how it went. I can't believe it. It's like when you're pumping gas into a Ford F150 full-blast and release the pump handle to stop right on $80.00 even. He's got more musical talent in his pinky fingernail than I have mechanical ability in my spleen, appendix and tonsils combined. Thank you RojoDelChocolate. Here I'm cleaning up the fly cuts, balancing the piston and rod assemblies and preparing to double-check my valve clearance. I had to start by cleaning up and re-lubricating every part that was removed to prevent contamination of the assembly. This is the tedious part of doing the job right. We learned that this whole engine assembly was pretty far-gone in previous videos, way past its service limits, so making it fit and work again takes extensive testing, machining, and re-testing to ensure all of the parts fit. This is likely the most challenging build I will perform on any car in my driveway. It has been so far. But because I have not demonstrated the basics of engine balancing beyond what a machine shop has to do to zero balance a flat-plane crankshaft, I thought I'd give it its own video right here with one of the test assemblies. When you balance rods by themselves, you balance the big-end and the pin-bore separately. You get weights of both ends of the rod using a jig and a process that I don't demonstrate in this video. The reason you do this is because the position of the weight behaves differently relative to its distance from the crankshaft pin. Weight on the big end has less of an effect than if there's extra weight on the pin bore. The best balanced engines have every part of the piston and rod assemblies balanced separately within .1 grams using the method I just described, and not the method shown in this video. The method shown here involves weighing ALL of the piston and rod assembly components together, and then taking out the difference just on the casting lines of the connecting rod. They were already off-balance and had never been balanced before. This is an improvement, not perfection. It's still something this engine needed to have done. I'm not using the big-end/small-end method here because these pistons are pressed-on and if I try to remove them from the rod, it will shatter the piston skirts. No thank you. I'm not replacing these pistons. The reason I grind down the casting lines is because it's weight is in a neutral territory, extending from the big end to the small end. It's easier to take an even amount off when you grind across the entire length of the rods. This method leaves a lot up to assumption as there's no way to determine which end of the rod is heavier, or if the weight is in a wrist pin or piston. All this does is ensure the crankshaft is spinning an even amount of weight on all 4 of its rod journals. Grams of weight turn into pounds of force at idle speeds. My goal is to remove that vibration at any and all rotations per minute if I can. So I make them all the same within 1.0 grams of their combined weight. If you're assembling and balancing all NEW parts, not parts that have worn together and need to go back in the same holes... you will have to balance the individual parts and pieces. This is the poor man's method. Even with the new parts you still do the poor man's method once you're done balancing the individual parts and assemble them, but sometimes when you're lucky with the new parts, you can just swap around the rods, pins and fasteners to balance the weights on each assembly and not have to grind anything at all. That's awfully nice when that happens. You know the Hyundai won't let me get away with that. Removing stress risers might help strengthen the rods, but it's not what I'm after here or else I would have removed the whole casting line from all of them. These rods should be fine for my goals. My goal is to remove just enough from all of the fatter rods (weight wise) to match the lightest one. Balancing an inline 4 engine with a flat-plane crank is easy if you have already balanced the crankshaft. This crank was already balanced for the GSX motor on a previous occasion. It's zero'd out. In order to balance the rotating assembly, all you do is make the piston and rod assemblies weigh identically to its neighbors. Just 3 grams of weight can produce over a hundred pounds of lateral forces at red-line so this is an aspect of engine building that you should not overlook. All you need to do is get all of them within 1 gram. The scale I'm using measures whole grams, so that's all I can do anyway. This method is acceptable for balancing a rotating assembly as long as you're smart about how to remove the weight.





Trans-Am Series Racing Cars: 2010 Monterey Historics Part 1 of 2: Paddock
1966-1972 Trans-Am series racing cars in the paddock. Trans-Am Sound-O-Rama.





Cameron Lawrence Racing Trans-Am Road Atlanta 2014
Cameron Lawrence driving the #1 Miller Racing Camaro in Trans-Am TA2 at Road Atlanta 2014. Started 3rd and worked my way to the lead before being taken out in Turn 10 which lead to a bent wheel and flat tire. After going a lap down in the pits I worked my way past the leaders and back on the lead lap to a 7th place finish. I was able to keep my points lead and set a track record in the process. The car that hit me was penalized half of his points for the avoidable contact.





2014 Australian Trans-Am Round 1
Round 1 of the 2014 Tenkate Plant Hire Australian Trans-Am series from the historic Lakeside Raceway. A field of 18 Cars started the event including Ford Mustangs, Chevrolet Camaros, a Pontiac Firebird, an AMC Javelin and a Ford Falcon Sprint. Champion Holden HQ Racer Gary Bonwick joined the field in the Firebird this weekend, as well as Group N Racer Simon Trapp filling in for John Lord in the Kevin Bartlett Replica Channel 9 Camaro. Craig Harris returned from a 10-year hiatus from Motorsport with Pole and 1 Race win. We are also pleased to announce that Australian Trans-Am will be a headline category at this year's MUSCLE CAR MASTERS at Eastern Creek on Father's Day. Australian Trans-Am is sponsored by Tenkate Plant Hire, Shannons Insurance, King Springs, Palmer Steel Industries, Hoosier Racing Tires, Performance Wheels and R Jay Electrical. Songs Used: No One Fits by Airbourne Stand Up for Rock n Roll by Airbourne Wake Me Up by Avicii Thanks to Dewi Jones Photography and Iwan Jones for assisting with Filming. Round 2 is at Queensland Raceway 3/4 May.





NASCAR Legend Rusty Wallace Testing Vintage 1969 Trans Am Racing Mustang at Road America
Climb aboard with Rusty Wallace, legendary NASCAR Sprint Cup driver and ESPN commentator, as he drives RT Racing's #33 vintage racing Mustang at historic Road America.





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