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Understanding Car Crashes: It's Basic Physics

What happens to vehicles and their occupants in crashes is determined by science. "You can't argue with the laws of physics," says Griff Jones, award-winning high school physics teacher who goes behind the scenes at the Institute's Vehicle Research Center to explore the basic science behind car crashes. Using a series of vehicle maneuvers on a test track plus filmed results of vehicle crash tests, Jones explains in anything but lecture style the concept of inertia, the relationship between crash forces and inertia, momentum and impulse, and a lot more. Quote from Paul G. Hewitt, the developer of the "Conceptual Physics" curriculum and author of the best selling text book by the same name: "The video "Understanding Car Crashes: It's Basic Physics" and accompanying teacher's guide are wonderful. The pacing is excellent, the coverage fascinating, and most importantly, the physics is correct. It's a first rate teaching package. I give it five stars!" DVD contains updated footage and additional material for teachers To obtain a DVD copy, go to http://www.iihs.org/videos/default.html


 


More Videos...


Understanding Car Crashes: When Physics Meets Biology
Why do some car crashes produce only minor injuries? How can a single crash of a car into a wall involve three separate collisions? Griff Jones, award-winning science teacher, returns to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety's Vehicle Research Center to answer these questions and to examine the laws of nature that determine what happens to the human body in a crash. Jones reviews levels of organization in the body and explains how body cavities house and protect major internal organs. Through creative experiments, he explores how the third collision can cause injuries to organs. He introduces the concepts of stress and strain. He demonstrates how shockwaves can damage tissue and what happens at the cellular level. Tools from the field of injury biomechanics, like biofidelic crash test dummies, help doctors and engineers determine what works to reduce injuries and deaths in crashes. The key to preventing injuries in any type of crash, whether it's in a race car or a family sedan, is to reduce forces on occupants. Extending impact time, keeping the occupant compartment intact, and tying occupants to the compartment are what keep people safe in car crashes when physics meets biology. DVD contains additional material for teachers To obtain a DVD copy, go to http://www.iihs.org/videos/default.html





Keeping children safe in crashes: Overview
For parents of all children More than 1,000 children 12 and younger die in passenger vehicles crashes every year, and more than 100,000 are injured. Parents can reduce the risk to their kids by properly securing them in the back seats. The "Keeping Children Safe In Crashes" series of videos help parents choose the right type of restraint for their child's age and size and provide general information on installation and use. More information at http://www.iihs.org/research/topics/children.html To obtain a DVD copy, go to http://www.iihs.org/videos/default.html





1959 Chevrolet Bel Air vs. 2009 Chevrolet Malibu IIHS crash test
IIHS 50th anniversary demonstration test • September 9, 2009 In the 50 years since US insurers organized the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, car crashworthiness has improved. Demonstrating this was a crash test conducted between a 1959 Chevrolet Bel Air and a 2009 Chevrolet Malibu. In a real-world collision similar to this test, occupants of the new model would fare much better than in the vintage Chevy. "It was night and day, the difference in occupant protection," says Institute president Adrian Lund. "What this test shows is that automakers don't build cars like they used to. They build them better." The crash test was conducted at an event to celebrate the contributions of auto insurers to highway safety progress over 50 years. Beginning with the Institute's 1959 founding, insurers have maintained the resolve, articulated in the 1950s, to "conduct, sponsor, and encourage programs designed to aid in the conservation and preservation of life and property from the hazards of highway accidents." More information at http://www.iihs.org





Reducing Your Risks In The Crash
The best way to reduce the risks is to make sure everyone in the vehicle is effectively restrained. This video uses test footage of what happens during crashes to show how to get the most from occupant restraints. For example, it shows how to buckle up properly and why you should sit back from the steering wheel and airbag. To obtain a DVD copy, go to http://www.iihs.org/videos/default.html





Mythbusters - Car crash force





6 Peoples Reactions to the CRAZY 900hp 3Dx Evo
We had a blast giving people rides in the Evo, even had a guest driver when we gave Miss Thai Thai a ride after her photo shoot! See what people thought about the car, caught a lot of people off guard. TEXAS STREETS & TX2K13 Release now and shipping! http://www.1320video.com





Understanding Car Crashes: When Physics Meets Biology
Why do some car crashes produce only minor injuries? How can a single crash of a car into a wall involve three separate collisions? Griff Jones, award-winning science teacher, returns to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety's Vehicle Research Center to answer these questions and to examine the laws of nature that determine what happens to the human body in a crash. Jones reviews levels of organization in the body and explains how body cavities house and protect major internal organs. Through creative experiments, he explores how the third collision can cause injuries to organs. He introduces the concepts of stress and strain. He demonstrates how shockwaves can damage tissue and what happens at the cellular level. Tools from the field of injury biomechanics, like biofidelic crash test dummies, help doctors and engineers determine what works to reduce injuries and deaths in crashes. The key to preventing injuries in any type of crash, whether it's in a race car or a family sedan, is to reduce forces on occupants. Extending impact time, keeping the occupant compartment intact, and tying occupants to the compartment are what keep people safe in car crashes when physics meets biology. DVD contains additional material for teachers To obtain a DVD copy, go to http://www.iihs.org/videos/default.html





2014 Volvo XC90 small overlap IIHS crash test
2014 Volvo XC90 40 mph small overlap IIHS crash test Overall evaluation: Good Full rating at http://www.iihs.org/iihs/ratings/vehicle/v/volvo/xc90/2014





Mercedes-Benz E-Class Estate Vs. Ford Explorer IIHS-Style Side Impact
Mercedes Front-Rear_Explorer Driver-Passenger HIC______1255-96______79-49 *No thorax or lower spine readings.





Low-speed vehicle crash tests
IIHS news release • May 20, 2010 ARLINGTON, VA - Low-speed vehicles and minitrucks shouldn't share busy public roads with regular traffic More states are allowing a relatively new breed of vehicle on public roads, but crash tests by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety show why the mix of low-speed vehicles (LSVs) or minitrucks and regular traffic is a deadly combination. LSVs are designed for tooling around residential neighborhoods, and minitrucks are for hauling cargo off-road. While these vehicles have a lot of appeal as a way to reduce emissions and cut fuel use, they don't have to meet the basic safety standards that cars and pickups do, and they aren't designed to protect their occupants in crashes. Full text of release at http://www.iihs.org/news/rss/pr052010.html





Weak federal standard allows deadly car-into-truck crashes
IIHS news release • March 1, 2011 Underride guards on big rigs often fail in crashes; Institute petitions government for new standard ARLINGTON, VA — New crash tests and analysis by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety demonstrate that underride guards on tractor-trailers can fail in relatively low-speed crashes — with deadly consequences. The Institute is petitioning the federal government to require stronger underride guards that will remain in place during a crash and to mandate guards for more large trucks and trailers. Full text of release at http://www.iihs.org/news/rss/pr030111.html





New roof strength tests
IIHS news release • March 24, 2009 Roof strength is focus of new rating system; 4 of 12 small SUVs evaluated earn top marks ARLINGTON, VA — The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety is launching a new roof strength rating system to help consumers pick vehicles that will help protect them in rollover crashes. Twelve small SUVs are the first to be put to the test. Only 4 earn the top rating of good. The Volkswagen Tiguan has the strongest rated roof, and the Kia Sportage has the weakest among the 2008-09 models evaluated. Full text of release at http://www.iihs.org/news/rss/pr032409.html





SMART car crash (TEST)





Crash compilation (violent car crashes)
*WARNING: Some of these crashes were fatal. RIP to the drivers who died in the accidents.* Many car crashes with music from Dragonforce - black fire





2001 Honda Civic Coupe Vs. 2003 Chevrolet Silverado IIHS-Style Frontal Impact
SIlverado was moving at 40.5 Km/h while the Civic was moving at 65 Km/h, in this 40% offset test. Civic Information Driver-Passenger HIC 203-400 Chest G's 45-29 Left Femur 2682-3067 Right Femur 4488-154 Silverado Information Driver-Passenger HIC 121-61 Chest G's 30-30 Left Femur 3411-2995 Right Femur 3250-1558 *Look at the driver's footwell*





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