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Understanding Car Crashes: It's Basic Physics

What happens to vehicles and their occupants in crashes is determined by science. "You can't argue with the laws of physics," says Griff Jones, award-winning high school physics teacher who goes behind the scenes at the Institute's Vehicle Research Center to explore the basic science behind car crashes. Using a series of vehicle maneuvers on a test track plus filmed results of vehicle crash tests, Jones explains in anything but lecture style the concept of inertia, the relationship between crash forces and inertia, momentum and impulse, and a lot more. Quote from Paul G. Hewitt, the developer of the "Conceptual Physics" curriculum and author of the best selling text book by the same name: "The video "Understanding Car Crashes: It's Basic Physics" and accompanying teacher's guide are wonderful. The pacing is excellent, the coverage fascinating, and most importantly, the physics is correct. It's a first rate teaching package. I give it five stars!" DVD contains updated footage and additional material for teachers To obtain a DVD copy, go to http://www.iihs.org/videos/default.html


 


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Understanding Car Crashes: When Physics Meets Biology
Why do some car crashes produce only minor injuries? How can a single crash of a car into a wall involve three separate collisions? Griff Jones, award-winning science teacher, returns to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety's Vehicle Research Center to answer these questions and to examine the laws of nature that determine what happens to the human body in a crash. Jones reviews levels of organization in the body and explains how body cavities house and protect major internal organs. Through creative experiments, he explores how the third collision can cause injuries to organs. He introduces the concepts of stress and strain. He demonstrates how shockwaves can damage tissue and what happens at the cellular level. Tools from the field of injury biomechanics, like biofidelic crash test dummies, help doctors and engineers determine what works to reduce injuries and deaths in crashes. The key to preventing injuries in any type of crash, whether it's in a race car or a family sedan, is to reduce forces on occupants. Extending impact time, keeping the occupant compartment intact, and tying occupants to the compartment are what keep people safe in car crashes when physics meets biology. DVD contains additional material for teachers To obtain a DVD copy, go to http://www.iihs.org/videos/default.html





Insurers Preventing Harm
Beginning with the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety's 1959 founding, insurers have maintained the resolve, articulated in the 1950s, to "conduct, sponsor, and encourage programs designed to aid in the conservation and preservation of life and property from the hazards of highway accidents." A decade after the Institute was founded, insurers directed this organization to begin collecting data on crashes and the cost of repairing vehicles damaged in crashes. To lead this work and the Institute's expanded research program, insurers named a new president, William Haddon Jr., who already was a pioneer in the field of highway safety. In welcoming Dr. Haddon, Thomas Morrill of State Farm said "the ability to bring unbiased scientific data to the table is extremely valuable." This scientific approach, ushered in by Dr. Haddon, is a hallmark of Institute work. It's why the Institute launched the Highway Loss Data Institute in 1972 — to collect and analyze insurance loss results to provide consumers with model-by-model comparisons. Another Institute milestone was the 1992 opening of the Vehicle Research Center. Since then, the Institute has conducted much of the research that has contributed to safer vehicles on US roads. At the 50th anniversary event, current Institute chairman Gregory Ostergren of American National Property and Casualty summed up a commitment to continue what fellow insurers began in 1959: "On this golden anniversary of the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, we celebrate this organization's accomplishments toward safer drivers, vehicles, and roadways. We salute the vision of the Institute's founders and proudly continue their commitment to highway safety." More information at http://www.iihs.org/50th/default.html





Reducing Your Risks In The Crash
The best way to reduce the risks is to make sure everyone in the vehicle is effectively restrained. This video uses test footage of what happens during crashes to show how to get the most from occupant restraints. For example, it shows how to buckle up properly and why you should sit back from the steering wheel and airbag. To obtain a DVD copy, go to http://www.iihs.org/videos/default.html





Reduciendo Su Riesgo En Un Accidente
Spanish-language version of "Reducing Your Risks In The Crash" The best way to reduce the risks is to make sure everyone in the vehicle is effectively restrained. This video uses test footage of what happens during crashes to show how to get the most from occupant restraints. For example, it shows how to buckle up properly and why you should sit back from the steering wheel and airbag. To obtain a DVD or VHS copy, go to http://www.iihs.org/videos/default.html





Mythbusters - Car crash force





Keeping children safe in crashes: Overview
For parents of all children More than 1,000 children 12 and younger die in passenger vehicles crashes every year, and more than 100,000 are injured. Parents can reduce the risk to their kids by properly securing them in the back seats. The "Keeping Children Safe In Crashes" series of videos help parents choose the right type of restraint for their child's age and size and provide general information on installation and use. More information at http://www.iihs.org/research/topics/children.html To obtain a DVD copy, go to http://www.iihs.org/videos/default.html





SUVs and pickups pose less risk to people in crashes
IIHS news release • September 28, 2011 Effort to make SUVs, pickups less deadly to car occupants in crashes is paying off ARLINGTON, VA - Today's SUVs and pickups pose far less risk to people in cars and minivans than previous generations, a new study from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety shows. Until recently, SUVs and pickups were more likely than cars or minivans of the same weight to be involved in crashes that killed occupants of other cars or minivans. That's no longer the case for SUVs, and for pickups the higher risk is much less pronounced than it had been. Full text of release at http://www.iihs.org/news/rss/pr092811.html





Mercedes-Benz E-Class Estate Vs. Ford Explorer IIHS-Style Side Impact
Mercedes Front-Rear_Explorer Driver-Passenger HIC______1255-96______79-49 *No thorax or lower spine readings.





SMART car crash (TEST)





Young Drivers: The High Risk Years
Getting a driver's license is a rite of passage for teenagers, but it also marks the start of their most dangerous years on the road. Teen drivers have much higher crash rates than adults. Fortunately, there are ways parents can help to reduce the risks. This video highlights the stories of three teens whose lives ended too soon and examines common factors such as inexperience, immaturity, and speeding that lead to many crashes involving young, novice drivers. Teens interviewed speak frankly about their driving habits. They recount crashes and near misses. They describe minding their manners when grown-ups are along for the ride but relaxing the rules when they're with friends. Institute experts provide insight into the crucial role parents play by enforcing their state's graduated licensing laws, establishing their own rules, and providing plenty of supervised time behind the wheel. To obtain a DVD copy, go to http://www.iihs.org/videos/default.html





1959 Chevrolet Bel Air vs. 2009 Chevrolet Malibu IIHS crash test
IIHS 50th anniversary demonstration test • September 9, 2009 In the 50 years since US insurers organized the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, car crashworthiness has improved. Demonstrating this was a crash test conducted between a 1959 Chevrolet Bel Air and a 2009 Chevrolet Malibu. In a real-world collision similar to this test, occupants of the new model would fare much better than in the vintage Chevy. "It was night and day, the difference in occupant protection," says Institute president Adrian Lund. "What this test shows is that automakers don't build cars like they used to. They build them better." The crash test was conducted at an event to celebrate the contributions of auto insurers to highway safety progress over 50 years. Beginning with the Institute's 1959 founding, insurers have maintained the resolve, articulated in the 1950s, to "conduct, sponsor, and encourage programs designed to aid in the conservation and preservation of life and property from the hazards of highway accidents." More information at http://www.iihs.org





2014 Honda Pilot small overlap IIHS crash test
2014 Honda Pilot 40 mph small overlap IIHS crash test Overall evaluation: Poor Full rating at http://www.iihs.org/iihs/ratings/vehicle/v/honda/pilot/2014





Best Exotic Car Crash Compilation from Super Speeders
Its pretty inevitable that when you give the wrong person a fast car bad things are bound to happen. When the only certification you need to purchase something you aren't able to operate is money, we are just glad to catch it on camera for you guys. NONE of these crashes resulted in any serious injury, the only injury from any of these were a pair of bruised knees and a bunch of bruised egos. FACEBOOK - http://www.facebook.com/pages/Super-Speeders/204571479556925





New roof strength tests
IIHS news release • March 24, 2009 Roof strength is focus of new rating system; 4 of 12 small SUVs evaluated earn top marks ARLINGTON, VA — The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety is launching a new roof strength rating system to help consumers pick vehicles that will help protect them in rollover crashes. Twelve small SUVs are the first to be put to the test. Only 4 earn the top rating of good. The Volkswagen Tiguan has the strongest rated roof, and the Kia Sportage has the weakest among the 2008-09 models evaluated. Full text of release at http://www.iihs.org/news/rss/pr032409.html





Understanding Car Crashes: When Physics Meets Biology
Why do some car crashes produce only minor injuries? How can a single crash of a car into a wall involve three separate collisions? Griff Jones, award-winning science teacher, returns to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety's Vehicle Research Center to answer these questions and to examine the laws of nature that determine what happens to the human body in a crash. Jones reviews levels of organization in the body and explains how body cavities house and protect major internal organs. Through creative experiments, he explores how the third collision can cause injuries to organs. He introduces the concepts of stress and strain. He demonstrates how shockwaves can damage tissue and what happens at the cellular level. Tools from the field of injury biomechanics, like biofidelic crash test dummies, help doctors and engineers determine what works to reduce injuries and deaths in crashes. The key to preventing injuries in any type of crash, whether it's in a race car or a family sedan, is to reduce forces on occupants. Extending impact time, keeping the occupant compartment intact, and tying occupants to the compartment are what keep people safe in car crashes when physics meets biology. DVD contains additional material for teachers To obtain a DVD copy, go to http://www.iihs.org/videos/default.html





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