Drag Racing 1/4 Mile times 0-60 Dyno Fast Cars Muscle Cars

Understanding Car Crashes: It's Basic Physics

What happens to vehicles and their occupants in crashes is determined by science. "You can't argue with the laws of physics," says Griff Jones, award-winning high school physics teacher who goes behind the scenes at the Institute's Vehicle Research Center to explore the basic science behind car crashes. Using a series of vehicle maneuvers on a test track plus filmed results of vehicle crash tests, Jones explains in anything but lecture style the concept of inertia, the relationship between crash forces and inertia, momentum and impulse, and a lot more. Quote from Paul G. Hewitt, the developer of the "Conceptual Physics" curriculum and author of the best selling text book by the same name: "The video "Understanding Car Crashes: It's Basic Physics" and accompanying teacher's guide are wonderful. The pacing is excellent, the coverage fascinating, and most importantly, the physics is correct. It's a first rate teaching package. I give it five stars!" DVD contains updated footage and additional material for teachers To obtain a DVD copy, go to http://www.iihs.org/videos/default.html


 


More Videos...


Understanding Car Crashes: When Physics Meets Biology
Why do some car crashes produce only minor injuries? How can a single crash of a car into a wall involve three separate collisions? Griff Jones, award-winning science teacher, returns to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety's Vehicle Research Center to answer these questions and to examine the laws of nature that determine what happens to the human body in a crash. Jones reviews levels of organization in the body and explains how body cavities house and protect major internal organs. Through creative experiments, he explores how the third collision can cause injuries to organs. He introduces the concepts of stress and strain. He demonstrates how shockwaves can damage tissue and what happens at the cellular level. Tools from the field of injury biomechanics, like biofidelic crash test dummies, help doctors and engineers determine what works to reduce injuries and deaths in crashes. The key to preventing injuries in any type of crash, whether it's in a race car or a family sedan, is to reduce forces on occupants. Extending impact time, keeping the occupant compartment intact, and tying occupants to the compartment are what keep people safe in car crashes when physics meets biology. DVD contains additional material for teachers To obtain a DVD copy, go to http://www.iihs.org/videos/default.html





Reducing Your Risks In The Crash
The best way to reduce the risks is to make sure everyone in the vehicle is effectively restrained. This video uses test footage of what happens during crashes to show how to get the most from occupant restraints. For example, it shows how to buckle up properly and why you should sit back from the steering wheel and airbag. To obtain a DVD copy, go to http://www.iihs.org/videos/default.html





Huge cost of mismatched bumpers
IIHS news release • December 2, 2010 Huge cost of mismatched bumpers: When bumpers on cars and SUVs don't line up (and many of them don't), low-speed collisions produce more damage and higher repair costs ARLINGTON, VA — Bumpers are the first line of defense against costly damage in everyday low-speed crashes. Bumpers on cars are designed to match up with each other in collisions, but a long-standing gap in federal regulations exempts SUVs from the same rules. New Insurance Institute for Highway Safety crash tests demonstrate the results: SUV bumpers that don't line up with those on cars can lead to huge repair bills in what should be minor collisions in stop-and-go traffic. Full text of release at: http://www.iihs.org/news/rss/pr120210.html





Low-speed vehicle crash tests
IIHS news release • May 20, 2010 ARLINGTON, VA - Low-speed vehicles and minitrucks shouldn't share busy public roads with regular traffic More states are allowing a relatively new breed of vehicle on public roads, but crash tests by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety show why the mix of low-speed vehicles (LSVs) or minitrucks and regular traffic is a deadly combination. LSVs are designed for tooling around residential neighborhoods, and minitrucks are for hauling cargo off-road. While these vehicles have a lot of appeal as a way to reduce emissions and cut fuel use, they don't have to meet the basic safety standards that cars and pickups do, and they aren't designed to protect their occupants in crashes. Full text of release at http://www.iihs.org/news/rss/pr052010.html





Understanding Car Crashes: When Physics Meets Biology
Why do some car crashes produce only minor injuries? How can a single crash of a car into a wall involve three separate collisions? Griff Jones, award-winning science teacher, returns to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety's Vehicle Research Center to answer these questions and to examine the laws of nature that determine what happens to the human body in a crash. Jones reviews levels of organization in the body and explains how body cavities house and protect major internal organs. Through creative experiments, he explores how the third collision can cause injuries to organs. He introduces the concepts of stress and strain. He demonstrates how shockwaves can damage tissue and what happens at the cellular level. Tools from the field of injury biomechanics, like biofidelic crash test dummies, help doctors and engineers determine what works to reduce injuries and deaths in crashes. The key to preventing injuries in any type of crash, whether it's in a race car or a family sedan, is to reduce forces on occupants. Extending impact time, keeping the occupant compartment intact, and tying occupants to the compartment are what keep people safe in car crashes when physics meets biology. DVD contains additional material for teachers To obtain a DVD copy, go to http://www.iihs.org/videos/default.html





Volvo's Crash Test Laboratory Celebrates a Decade of Safety - 1/2
Go to http://gtchannel.com for more car videos and content. Volvo Cars' crash-test laboratory in Torslanda, Sweden turns 10 this year and the almost 3,000 full-scale tests that have been carried out during the high-tech facility's first decade have helped give Volvo owners even safer cars. Go to http://gtchannel.com for more car videos and content.





Crash Test Betwen old and new cars.mpg
Renault Espace





Ford F150 and Honda Civic frontal crash test by IIHS
When large, truck-based SUVs collide with passenger cars or minivans, the results can be devastating for the occupants of the latter. But fatalities in such accidents are on the decrease in the United States thanks to measures employed by automakers. Traffic deaths are down 64 percent since the year 2000 due to changes in automobile design such as lower bumpers for SUVs and better-protect cabin cells for passenger cars. In 2000, the death rate for car and minivan passengers in collisions with trucks or SUVs was 44 deaths per million. That came down to 16 deaths per million by 2009. The study was conducted by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, a private-sector group based in Arlington, Virginia. "By working together, the automakers got life-saving changes done quickly," said Joe Nolan, the institute's chief administrative officer.





Understanding Car Crashes: It's Basic Physics trailer
Trailer for IIHS video "Understanding Car Crashes: It's Basic Physics" What happens to vehicles and their occupants in crashes is determined by science. "You can't argue with the laws of physics," says Griff Jones, award-winning high school physics teacher who goes behind the scenes at the Institute's Vehicle Research Center to explore the basic science behind car crashes. Using a series of vehicle maneuvers on a test track plus filmed results of vehicle crash tests, Jones explains in anything but lecture style the concept of inertia, the relationship between crash forces and inertia, momentum and impulse, and a lot more. Quote from Paul G. Hewitt, the developer of the "Conceptual Physics" curriculum and author of the best selling text book by the same name: "The video "Understanding Car Crashes: It's Basic Physics" and accompanying teacher's guide are wonderful. The pacing is excellent, the coverage fascinating, and most importantly, the physics is correct. It's a first rate teaching package. I give it five stars!" Watch full-length video at http://youtu.be/yUpiV2I_IRI





Crash test results for midsize family cars - IIHS news
IIHS news release • December 20, 2012 Family cars trump luxury models in new crash test; 13 cars earn 2013 TOP SAFETY PICK+ award A group of moderately priced midsize cars outperformed most of their luxury counterparts in a challenging new frontal crash test conducted by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) on 2013 models. Of the 18 midsize family cars evaluated in the small overlap test, two earn the top rating of good, 11 earn acceptable, three earn marginal, and two are poor. To reward 2013 models with superior crash protection, IIHS has created the TOP SAFETY PICK+ award, with the + indicating good or acceptable performance in the new small overlap test. So far, 13 models qualify for the accolade. Full text of release at http://www.iihs.org/news/rss/pr122012.html





MINICARS MICROCARS CRASH TEST FAIL CAR CARS AUTOS New Crash
MINICARS MICROCARS CRASH TEST FAIL CAR CARS AUTOS New Crash Tests Demonstrate the Influence of Vehicle Size and Weight on Safety in Crashes Results Are Relevant To Fuel Economy Policies Three front-to-front crash tests, each involving a microcar or minicar into a midsize model from the same manufacturer, show how extra vehicle size and weight enhance occupant protection in collisions. These Insurance Institute for Highway Safety tests are about the physics of car crashes, which dictate that very small cars generally can't protect people in crashes as well as bigger, heavier models. "There are good reasons people buy minicars," says Institute president Adrian Lund. "They're more affordable, and they use less gas. But the safety trade-offs are clear from our new tests. Equally clear are the implications when it comes to fuel economy. If automakers downsize cars so their fleets use less fuel, occupant safety will be compromised. However, there are ways to serve fuel economy and safety at the same time." The Institute didn't choose SUVs or pickup trucks, or even large cars, to pair with the micro and minis in the new crash tests. The choice of midsize cars reveals how much influence some extra size and weight can have on crash outcomes. The Institute chose pairs of 2009 models from Daimler, Honda, and Toyota because these automakers have micro and mini models that earn good frontal crashworthiness ratings, based on the Institute's offset test into a deformable barrier. Researchers rated performance in the 40 mph car-to-car tests, like the front-into-barrier tests, based on measured intrusion into the occupant compartment, forces recorded on the driver dummy, and movement of the dummy during the impact. Laws of physics prevail: The Honda Fit, Smart Fortwo, and Toyota Yaris are good performers in the Institute's frontal offset barrier test, but all three are poor performers in the frontal collisions with midsize cars. These results reflect the laws of the physical universe, specifically principles related to force and distance.





► Smart Fortwo VS Mercedes E-Class - CRASH TEST
More Crash Test on http://www.youcarpress.com





Crash Test 1959 Chevrolet Bel Air VS. 2009 Chevrolet Malibu (Frontal Offset) IIHS 50th Anniversary
In the 50 years since US insurers organized the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, car crashworthiness has improved. Demonstrating this was a crash test conducted on Sept. 9 between a 1959 Chevrolet Bel Air and a 2009 Chevrolet Malibu. In a real-world collision similar to this test, occupants of the new model would fare much better than in the vintage Chevy. "It was night and day, the difference in occupant protection," says Institute president Adrian Lund. What this test shows is that automakers don't build cars like they used to. They build them better." The crash test was conducted at an event to celebrate the contributions of auto insurers to highway safety progress over 50 years. Beginning with the Institute's 1959 founding, insurers have maintained the resolve, articulated in the 1950s, to "conduct, sponsor, and encourage programs designed to aid in the conservation and preservation of life and property from the hazards of highway accidents." A decade after the Institute was founded, insurers directed this organization to begin collecting data on crashes and the cost of repairing vehicles damaged in crashes. To lead this work and the Institute's expanded research program, insurers named a new president, William Haddon Jr., who already was a pioneer in the field of highway safety. In welcoming Dr. Haddon, Thomas Morrill of State Farm said "the ability to bring unbiased scientific data to the table is extremely valuable." This scientific approach, ushered in by Dr. Haddon, is a hallmark of Institute work. It's why the Institute launched the Highway Loss Data Institute in 1972 — to collect and analyze insurance loss results to provide consumers with model-by-model comparisons. Another Institute milestone was the 1992 opening of the Vehicle Research Center. Since then, the Institute has conducted much of the research that has contributed to safer vehicles on US roads. At the anniversary event, current Institute chairman Gregory Ostergren of American National Property and Casualty summed up a commitment to continue what fellow insurers began in 1959: "On this golden anniversary of the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, we celebrate this organization's accomplishments toward safer drivers, vehicles, and roadways. We salute the vision of the Institute's founders and proudly continue their commitment to highway safety."





Fifth Gear [20x01] - Ford Focus 120mph Crash Test
Ford Focus crashed into concrete wall at a speed of 120 miles an hour (193 kilometers an hour). Copyright Channel 5 Broadcasting Ltd. 2011





► 2012 Grand Cherokee CRASH TEST
In the frontal impact, the driver's inboard seat rail was found to have very nearly broken in two, and was mainly held together only by the threaded steel rod which controls fore-aft adjustment of the seat. The break occurred just at the point where the lower anchorage for the driver's seat belt attaches to the rail, and is thought to have been caused by the high tensile forces in the belt during the test. As a result, there was additional forward movement of the dummy which contributed to 'bottoming out' of the airbag i.e. there was insufficient pressure in the airbag to prevent the driver's head from making contact, through the fabric of the airbag, with the steering wheel rim. Euro NCAP has been informed that Jeep are investigating the cause of the seat rail failure and intend to improve the seat track design, but have no current plans to re-work existing vehicles. Although dummy readings were good, structures in the dashboard were thought to present a risk of injury to the knees and femurs of occupants of different sizes and to those sat in different positions. Maximum points were scored in the side barrier test but, in the more severe side pole impact, protection of the chest was rated as marginal. The Grand Cherokee has an 'active' head restraint which senses when a rear-end impact has occurred and moves the restraint forward to minimise the time to restrain head movement. Jeep showed that the system responded in a broad range of accident severities, and the whiplash tests were performed with the system active. Nevertheless, the protection provided against neck injuries in a rear-end collision was rated as marginal.




Which car is faster? Which Car is Faster?





Similar 1/4 mile timeslips to browse:

1990 Ferrari Testarossa : 11.900 @ 139.000
John Carmack, Engine: 12-cyl 'flat', Turbos: twin turbo


2003 Victory Tour Cruiser : 12.335 @ 108.750
jethro,


2003 Victory Tour Cruiser TC-S: 13.020 @ 99.730
Kevin Cross, Engine: Lil Ole 92,


1995 Saturn SW2 : 16.400 @ 84.180
Miller, Engine: I4,


1994 Saturn SW2 twin cam: 16.430 @ 84.410
E rock, Engine: 1.9L 4 banger twin cam, Tires: different brands all USED


1994 Saturn SW2 twin cam: 16.650 @ 83.200
E rock, Engine: 1.9L 4 banger twin cam, Tires: completely bald all different sizes and tires and


 


©2014 DragTimes - Disclaimer