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Renault F1 Engine

Formula-1 Renault Engine burning out


 


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Ferrari V12 Engine
Ferrari V12 Engine Assembly. From start to finish, one technician is responsible for the assembly........ For more automotive news: http://www.automotivetv.net/ Follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AutomotiveTv.net





Tribute to Renault F1 Engines
Tribute to Renault F1 Engines - TURN UP YOUR SPEAKERS Enjoy!!





Formula 1 Turbo Engines - The Golden Era [Full Documentary]
Formula One currently uses 1.6 litre four-stroke turbocharged 90 degree V6 reciprocating engines. The power a Formula One engine produces is generated by operating at a very high rotational speed, up to 15,000 revolutions per minute (RPM). This contrasts with road car engines of a similar size which typically operate at less than 6,000 rpm. The basic configuration of a naturally aspirated Formula One engine had not been greatly modified since the 1967 Cosworth DFV and the mean effective pressure had stayed at around 14 bar MEP.[3] Until the mid-1980s Formula One engines were limited to around 12,000 rpm due to the traditional metal valve springs used to close the valves. The speed required to operate the engine valves at a higher RPM called for ever stiffer springs, which increased the power loss to drive the camshaft and the valves to the point where the loss nearly offset the power gain through the increase in rpm. They were replaced by pneumatic valve springs introduced by Renault, which inherently have a rising rate (progressive rate) that allowed them to have extremely high spring rate at larger valve strokes without much increasing the driving power requirements at smaller strokes, thus lowering the overall power loss. Since the 1990s, all Formula One engine manufacturers used pneumatic valve springs with the pressurised air allowing engines to reach speeds of nearly 20,000 rpm. In addition to the use of pneumatic valve springs a Formula One engine's high RPM output has been made possible due to advances in metallurgy and design allowing lighter pistons and connecting rods to withstand the accelerations necessary to attain such high speeds, also by narrowing the connecting rod ends allowing for narrower main bearings. This allows for higher RPM with less bearing-damaging heat build-up. For each stroke, the piston goes from a null speed, to almost two times the mean speed, (approximately 40 m/s) then back to zero. This will occur four times for each of the four strokes in the cycle. Maximum piston acceleration occurs at top dead center and is in the region of 95,000 m/s2, about 10,000 times standard gravity or 10,000 g. In 1966, with sports cars capable of outrunning Formula 1 cars thanks to much larger and more powerful engines, the FIA increased engine capacity to 3.0 L atmospheric and 1.5 L compressed engines. Although a few manufacturers had been clamouring for bigger engines, the transition wasn't smooth and 1966 was a transitional year, with 2.0 L versions of the BRM and Coventry-Climax V8 engines being used by several entrants. The appearance of the standard-produced Cosworth DFV in 1967 made it possible for small manufacturers to join the series with a chassis designed in-house. Compression devices were allowed for the first time since 1960, but it wasn't until 1977 until a company actually had the finance and interest of building one, when Renault debuted their new Gordini V6 turbo at the British Grand Prix at Silverstone that year. It was in 1980 that Renault proved that turbocharging was the way to go in order to stay competitive in Formula One (particularly at high-altitude circuits like Kyalami in South Africa and Interlagos in Brazil) ; this engine had a considerable power advantage against the Ford-Cosworth DFV, Ferrari and Alfa Romeo naturally aspirated engines. Following this, Ferrari introduced their all-new turbocharged engine in 1981. Following these developments, Brabham owner Bernie Ecclestone managed to get BMW to make the team turbocharged inline-4 engines from 1982 onwards. And in 1983, Alfa Romeo made a turbocharged V8 engine, and in the same year and following years, Honda, Porsche (badged as TAG), Ford-Cosworth and other smaller companies made turbo-charged engines, mostly twin-turbocharged V6's. By the midpoint of 1985, every competing team had a turbocharged engine in their car. And by 1986, the power figures were becoming quite crazy- all of the engines had unrestricted turbo Boost in qualifying, where they were developing 1,350+ hp at 5.5 bar Boost (80 psi). These engines and gearboxes would only last about 2-3 laps, and for the race, the turbocharger's Boost was restricted to ensure engine reliability; but the engines still produced 950-1000 hp during the race. Following their experiences at Indianapolis, in 1971 Lotus made a few unsuccessful experiments with a Pratt & Whitney turbine fitted to chassis which had also 4WD. The power range was between 390 hp (290 kW) to 500 hp (370 kW), turbos 500 hp (370 kW) to 900 hp (670 kW) in race, in qualifying up to 1,300 hp (970 kW).





► Bentley Factory - W12 Engine
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F1 Renault Turbo sound "JPS Lotus Renault Legends of A.senna "Engine warming-up
JPS Lotus Renault V6 1500cc turbo 1986





Awesome V12 Monster diesel engine Awake and Alive startup
Awesome V12 Monster diesel engine Awake and Alive startup The first V-type engine (a 2-cylinder vee twin) was built in 1889 by Daimler, to a design by Wilhelm Maybach. By 1903 V8 engines were being produced for motor boat racing by the Société Antoinette to designs by Léon Levavasseur, building on experience gained with in-line four-cylinder engines. In 1904, the Putney Motor Works completed a new V12 marine racing engine -- the first V12 engine produced for any purpose.[2] Known as the 'Craig-Dörwald' engine after Putney's founding partners, the engine mounted pairs of L-head cylinders at a 90 degree included angle on an aluminium crankcase, using the same cylinder pairs that powered the company's standard 2-cylinder car. A single camshaft mounted in the central vee operated the valves directly. As in many marine engines, the camshaft could be slid longitudinally to engage a second set of cams, giving valve timing that reversed the engine's rotation to achieve astern propulsion. "Starting is by pumping a charge into each cylinder and switching on the trembler coils. A sliding camshaft gave direct reversing. The camshaft has fluted webs and main bearings in graduated thickness from the largest at the flywheel end."[3] Displacing 1,119.9 cuin (18,352 cc) (bore and stroke of 4.875" x 5" (123.8 x 127 mm)), the engine weighed 950 pounds (430 kg) and developed 150 bhp (110 kW). Little is known of the engine's achievements in the 40-foot hull for which it was intended, while a scheme to use the engine to power heavy freight vehicles never came to fruition.[2] One V12 Dörwald marine engine was found still running in a Hong Kong junk in the late-1960s. Two more V12s appeared in the 1909-10 motor boat racing season. The Lamb Boat & Engine Company of Clinton, Iowa built a 1,558.6 cuin (25,541 cc (5.25" x 6" (133.4 x 152.4 mm)) engine for the company's 32-foot Lamb IV. It weighed in at 2,114 pounds (959 kg). No weight is known for the massive 3,463.6 cuin (56,758 cc) (7" x 7.5" (177.8 x 190.5 mm)) F-head engine built by the Orleans Motor Company. Output is quoted as "nearly 400 bhp (300 kW)". By 1914, when Panhard built two 2,356.2 cuin (38,611 cc) (5" x 10" (127 x 254 mm)) engines with four-valve cylinder heads the V12 was well established in motor boat racing.[2] In automobiles, V12 engines have not been common due to their complexity and cost. They are used almost exclusively in expensive sports and luxury cars because of their power, smoother operation and distinctive sound. ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ ▬▬ ★ MORE INTERESTING VIDEOS: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yrbwGmtZ8pM&list=UUYH8swcp71EHt-88lkaMDTQ ★ SUBSCRIBE: http://goo.gl/GynuUU ★ Follow my Twitter: https://twitter.com/GeorgeDominik1 ★ Thanks For Watching ★ ★ Post comment , share and tell us what u think ★ ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ ▬▬





Ultimate Engine Explosions Collection
Sit back and enjoy those engines biting back.. Detroit Diesels VWs BMWs Trucks Semis No make or model Escapes





BEST Formula 1 Sounds - V6, V8, V10 and V12
Over the years I had the opportunity to film many Ferrari F1s from different eras (from the early V6 turbo to the V10, V12 up to the most recent V8) and with this video I want to show you a glimpse of the best sounds of these screaming engines, turn up the volume! Subscribe! http://bit.ly/SubscribeToMarchettino Facebook: http://on.fb.me/Marchettino Twitter: http://twitter.com/MarchettinoYT Google+: http://google.com/+Marchettino





The Best Ferrari F1 V12 Engine Sound
Start of ex A Prost F1 , after engine change ...Enjoy the fantastic noise of the V12 Ferrari engine.





Ferrari Formula 1 - Loud Start-up!
The music, the power and the vibe of an Italian supermonster! Look at these Italian guys trying to start up this F1 car, and turn up that volume when it finally starts. Enjoy the music transmitted by this beast/beauty. Dont forget to look on my channel for more videos! I would appreciate your comments and thumbs up! :D





Exhaust on fire (Dyno)
This happened while recording a full-load curve on the Dyno (oil dropped from the valve cover on the Exhaust!)





Ferrari Formula 1 - Engine warming up! LOUD SOUNDS!!
Here is a video of a Ferrari Formula 1 car I have recorded in the pitbox of circuit Spa Francorchamps. Before this F1 car went on track, the guys from Ferrari warmed up the engine. Enjoy this EPIC video with amazing loud Exhaust sounds! Follow me: 1st Channel: http://www.YouTube.com/GUMBAL 2nd Channel: http://www.YouTube.com/GUMBALTV 3rd Channel: http://www.YouTube.com/CarChannelClassic FACEBOOK: http://www.fb.com/GUMBALTV INSTAGRAM: http://www.instagram.com/GUMBALTV TWITTER: http://Twitter.com/GUMBALTV http://www.gumbal.tv Thanks you for watching my videos. All feedback on my videos are appreciated! Don't forget to like the video and subscribe to my channel. More videos coming up! - Hans





Building a formula 1 engine
Building a formula 1 Mclaren V10 engine





Engine Running NO OIL - NO SUMP - Seized Soild on Camera
Messing with a Mitsubishi Lancer There are loads of videos where people run an engine at full rev with no oil in it, and the engine seizes. Running it a medium rev, I wanted to see how long it would run with no lubrication, and I was surprised. However if the car was driving and the engine was under load, it would be dead in minutes!





Formula 1 Engine Sound Comparison: V8 vs. V10 vs. V12
This is a video I made to compare the sounds of three of the best naturally aspirated F1 engines ever produced; Ferrari 056 2.4 litre V8 equipped on the F2008, Ferrari 051 3.0 litre V10 equipped on the F2002 and Ferrari 044 3.0 litre V12 equipped on the 412 T2. These cars were all recorded in the same place so you can perfectly tell the differences between them. Follow me also on: - Facebook: http://www.fb.com/NM2255 - Google+: http://plus.google.com/+NM2255 - Twitter: http://Twitter.com/NM2255 - 2nd Car Channel: http://www.YouTube.com/NickCarVideos





Which car is faster? Which Car is Faster?




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1994 McLaren F1 : 11.110 @ 138.010
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