Drag Racing 1/4 Mile times 0-60 Dyno Fast Cars Muscle Cars

Trans-Am Group 7A Race at Laguna Seca

Pardon the shakes. I traveled 3200 miles to see this and I don't carry a tripod on this trek. I've cut out some of the panning, but how often do you get to see these kinds of cars actually racing the way they were intended to be raced? Enjoy the thoroughbreds! 2010 Rolex Monterey Motorsports Reunion Final standings... 1 77 Ken Epsman Saratoga, CA 1970 Dodge Challenger 5000cc 8 01:40.792 4 2 2 Jim Hague Saratoga, CA 1971 AMC Javelin 5000cc 8 01:41.757 3 3 64 Chad Raynal San Jose, CA 1969 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28 5000cc 7 01:42.643 7 4 102 2-Bruce Canepa Scotts Valley, CA 1969 Ford Mustang 4949cc 5 01:42.888 5 5 22 Gary Goeringer Nipomo, CA 1968 Ford Mustang 5000cc 7 01:43.398 2 6 113 13-Tomy Drissi Los Angeles, CA 1970 Chevrolet Camaro 4998cc 7 01:43.527 6 7 28 Gregory Weirick Malibu, CA 1970 Chevrolet Camaro 5000cc 7 01:44.253 6 8 57 Forrest Straight Mountain View, CA 1970 Ford Boss 302 Mustang 5000cc 6 01:44.370 2 9 42 Andy Boone Laguna Beach, CA 1970 Plymouth Barracuda 4983cc 7 01:44.447 4 10 201 1-Dan Walters Morgan Hill, CA 1972 AMC Javelin 5000cc 6 01:44.664 5 11 5 Michael Eisenberg Northridge, CA 1963 Ford Falcon Sprint 4737cc 7 01:44.996 3 12 45 Ken Adams Gilroy, CA 1969 Ford Boss 302 Mustang 4949cc 7 01:45.106 3 13 48 Craig H. Jackson Scottsdale, AZ 1970 Plymouth Barracuda 5000cc 7 01:45.120 7 14 71 Jeffrey H. Stout Manhattan Beach, CA 1970 Chevrolet Camaro 5000cc 7 01:45.121 5 15 1 Jim Click Tucson, AZ 1969 Ford Boss 302 Mustang 4998cc 5 01:45.172 3 16 30 Arthur Miller Santa Barbara, CA 1967 Chevrolet Camaro 5000cc 7 01:45.181 5 17 128 28-Nick DeVitis Sammamish, WA 1968 Ford Mustang 4949cc 7 01:45.766 3 18 15 Patrick S. Ryan Asheville, NC 1967 Chevrolet Camaro 5000cc 7 01:45.793 5 19 11 Stephen Sorenson Morgan Hill, CA 1970 Chevrolet Camaro 5000cc 7 01:46.401 6 20 215 15-Daniel Lipetz Vancouver, BC 1970 Ford Boss 302 Mustang 4950cc 6 01:47.353 3 21 41 Robert Canepa Diablo, CA 1970 Ford Boss 302 Mustang 5000cc 6 01:47.380 4 22 115 15-Brian Ferrin Sonoma, CA 1970 Ford Boss 302 Mustang 5000cc 7 01:47.946 5 23 89 Allen Denson Orange, CA 1966 Ford Mustang 4736cc 7 01:48.282 5 24 25 Craig Conley Rancho Santa Fe, CA 1970 Ford Boss 302 Mustang 5000cc 7 01:48.617 6 25 72 John Kiland Henderson, NV 1969 Chevrolet Camaro 5000cc 7 01:48.672 7 26 13 Christi Edelbrock Torrance, CA 1968 Chevrolet Camaro 5000cc 7 01:48.882 6 27 83 Gordon Gimbel Roseville, CA 1969 Ford Boss 302 Mustang 5000cc 7 01:49.262 5 28 67 John Linfesty Santa Monica, CA 1968 Chevrolet Camaro 4998cc 7 01:49.349 7 29 116 16-Donald Lee Portola Valley, CA 1968 Chevrolet Camaro 5000cc 7 01:49.566 6 30 16 Vic Edlebrock Torrance, CA 1969 Ford Boss 302 Mustang 5000cc 5 01:50.138 3 31 7 Tony Hart Moorpark, CA 1967 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28 5000cc 7 01:50.415 6 32 96 Ron Tribble Roseburg, OR 1967 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28 5000cc 7 01:51.430 7 33 248 48-Roger Williams San Diego, CA 1970 Chevrolet Camaro 5000cc 3 01:53.671 2 34 101 1-Jimmy Castle, Jr. Monterey, CA 1970 Chevrolet Camaro 5000cc 5 01:53.859 3 35 216 16-A. Ross Myers Boyertown, PA 1970 Ford Mustang 4998cc 7 01:55.118 7 36 202 2-William L. Ockerlu Holland, MI 1968 Ford Mustang 5000cc 7 01:55.545 3 37 78 Michael S. Martin San Juan Capistrano, C1970 Ford Boss 302 Mustang 4949cc 6 01:58.237 5 38 6 Tom McIntyre Burbank, CA 1968 Chevrolet Camaro 5000cc 39 31 Walt Boeninger Saratoga, CA 1967 Shelby Trans Am 4998cc 40 56 Tomy Drissi Northridge, CA 1967 Chevrolet Camaro 5000cc 41 98 Chris Liebenberg Boyertown, PA 1967 Mercury Cougar 4998cc 42 111 11-Norman Daniels Vancouver, WA 1968 Chevrolet Camaro 5000cc 43 148 48-Lance Smith San Diego, CA 1970 Chevrolet Camaro 5000cc


 


More Videos...


Trans Am Paddock '66-'72 Sights & Sounds
Happy July 4th! If you have speakers plugged into your computer, turn it up. Hopefully you have a subwoofer, too! This footage is me walking through Vic Edelbrock's collection of vintage Trans-Am racecars as they're being prepared for the Group 7A races and enjoying the sights and sounds... The Trans-Am Series is an automobile racing series which was created in 1966 by Sports Car Club of America (SCCA). This was the proving ground for all American manufacturers to compete with race-modified production cars. It ran until 1972 when at the height of Richard Nixon's incompetence dealing with OPEC, we had a gas shortage which was compounded by an embargo levied against us. Syria, Egypt and Tunisia didn't really like Nixon re-feuling their arch-enemy, Israel. Rather than address the shortage, the auto industry was heavily regulated to curb consumption. Further restrictions placed on the oil industry by an other rocket surgeon, Jimmy Carter, left us unable to further develop our own oil supplies which cemented these changes to the auto industry. These events changed muscle cars as we knew them into complete turds for over a decade while US auto makers struggled with the regulations and re-learned how to produce decent cars again... but for the "pony cars", it was the beginning of the end. The oil embargo of 1973 changed the shape of not only the auto industry, but all forms of auto racing to follow. You used to be able to afford these cars. I remember when... back when I was in high school... But it's 2010 now. This race celebrates all the classic cars you've dreamed of owning or being seen in. These things auction in the 6+ figures now (because of their race history). Enjoy this parade of '60's and early '70's model Ford Mustangs, Chevrolet Camaros, Plymouth Barracudas, Mercury Cougars, AMC Javelins, Pontiac Firebirds, and Dodge Challengers. This event required that they be in their original race condition in order to run with the Group 7A cars, so the contest to follow is all about how much compression these 40+ year old cars have left, and who's driving it. These beauties have been meticulously preserved by the best collectors, engineers and mechanics in the industry. I hope you guys can appreciate it because this is off my normal subject material. I just wanted to change things up and post something American on Independence day. This one's for the Veterans.





NASCAR of Yesteryears
Remember when you could recognize a NASCAR chassis? Back when they used production cars? Be nice to these old ladies... They're packin'. Don't let the drum brakes fool ya.





1970 Trans-Am Year in Review
Best year of Trans-Am racing!!





Hyundai Assembly 5 - Fighting The Valve Clearance
In previous videos I showed the 2 factors that really need to be scrutinized. Valve clearance and how you degree your camshafts. Of course we got sidetracked with plenty of other tips and tricks but I wanted to upload this video to illustrate that the process really isn't as easy as the animations, demonstrations and explanations make it look. The reasoning is sound, but the work to execute it can be very tedious. Setting up the valvetrain on this engine was very tedious. I say "was" because following this video, we can put that whole topic to bed. This is what it took. Not many people have the patience to deal with this, and I wanted to showcase here for those who are at the peak of their frustration with their builds. This kind of stuff can happen to anyone. Let my pain and suffering help you not feel so all alone. My apologies for the lack of new groundbreaking technical info. It's not a complicated task to install ARP head studs, and that was my plot twist. There are a couple of hurdles you may encounter depending on the production year of your engine, but they're well illustrated in this video. I'm not sure if their installation warrants a video all unto itself, but if you feel it does, speak up because I have 3 more engines to build. I can still do it. I just wanted to demonstrate that progress is being made on this, and despite the long breaks between uploads, a LOT is going on behind the scenes. This was 20 hours of repetitive work and I hope it's at least mildly entertaining. For me, this was the most boring video I've ever edited here because I had to re-live the same steps so many times, over and over again. I could very easily have inserted an hour of it in the wrong place and nobody would ever have known because it all looks the same. The text overlays are there only so you can be aware of what's different. A voiceover would have been pointless because the techniques illustrated are discussed ad-nauseum in the Cylinder Head 205 and 206 videos. The valve cover gasket installation process was covered in "Valve Cover Modification and Polishing", and the discussion about compression ratios is explained in "Calculate Your Compression Ratio". If you like the job the parts washer did, check out my DIY parts washer video. ;) Cylinder Head 205 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wbWWCKPuZG4 Cylinder Head 206 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4s2X3VUwADA Valve Cover Modification and Polishing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NiIi9EljLSk Calculate Your Compression Ratio https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bWze92nt9OU





Calculate Your Compression Ratio
This is everything you need to do to calculate your compression ratio. No foolin'. Every equation and process demonstrated. Find all your variables. Know your exact compression ratio in every cylinder. This is how you do it. Just because your service manual says your car is 7.8:1 or 8.5:1 compression doesn't mean that it is. Whenever there are casting irregularities, variations in piston height, parts that have been machined, non-OE parts, or changes to your head gasket selection, your compression ratio WILL change. It's highly probable that you're only CLOSE to spec if you've never touched your engine at all since it was "born", and that it doesn't MATCH spec. Even if it did, how would you know? This. 5 variables. V1 Swept Volume V2 Deck Volume V3 Piston-to-deck clearance V4 Piston dish cc's V5 Head combustion chamber cc's The ratio math: V1+V2+V3+V4+V5 = volume of combustion chamber at BDC V2+V3+V4+V5 = volume of combustion chamber at TDC The ratio is... (V1+V2+V3+V4+V5) ÷ (V2+V3+V4+V5) : (V2+V3+V4+V5) ÷ (V2+V3+V4+V5) or BDC ÷ TDC : TDC ÷ TDC First you fill in the variables, then you calculate volumes, then you add the volumes, then you reduce the ratio (fraction). It's that easy. Here are your magic numbers: 0.7854 = Pi quartered to the ten thousandth 16.387 = number of cc's in a cubic inch. If you divide any number in cc's by 16.387 it gives you inches. If you multiply any number in cubic inches by 16.387 it gives you cc's. Quartering pi lets you use the calculation: BORE x BORE x STROKE x .7854 = volume of a cylinder instead of... π x (BORE ÷ 2) x (BORE ÷ 2) x STROKE = volume of a cylinder Either way is right. You get the same result if you calculate pi to the ten thousandth. While I apologize for all the math, no I don't. I'm really not sorry. You actually clicked here for it whether you realize it or not. This is ALL the math, the tests, and the whole process to calculate your cylinder volumes and compression individually even if you don't know any of your variables yet. All of my numbers are present for those who want to calculate out the last 3 cylinders out of curiosity just to see how it affects cylinder volumes and compression ratios from one cylinder to the next. Why would I do that for you? Why would I deprive you of that practice? Just assume that all 4 of my combustion chambers are 41.75 ml if you do this. Clicking like share and subscribe helps a channel grow. It also motivates me. Don't sweat the camera. It's enough to know that so many of you care about what I'm doing here. From the bottom of my atmospheric dump, I thank you all! This gift horse's teeth are all over the place, but he sometimes poops gold nuggets. PS: Use ATF for your piston dish volume tests, not alcohol. Of course it's better just to use the spec sheet included with your pistons... but not everyone gets that luxury. Water is just fine for head combustion chamber tests. Dry and re-oil all parts that water touches.





1979 Laguna Seca Trans-AM
Last half of the Trans-AM race from Laguna Seca,CA





Cylinder Head 206 - Valve Clearance (& LSA)
This video is the companion and continuation video for Cylinder Head 205. In Cylinder Head 205 we covered the tools and technique for setting valve timing versus the factory-recommended specifications. It didn't work, thus; this video. How do I know it didn't work? Watch this video. The reason this is a companion video is because anyone changing their valve timing must also CHECK their valve clearance or risk bending valves. If I can install aftermarket cams, then I have made significant changes to my valve clearance. If I move cam gears on an engine that was previously running, then I have made significant changes to my valve clearance. If I have milled my head or block, I have made significant changes to my valve clearance. If I have installed larger valves, I have made significant changes to my valve clearance. Mitsubishi doesn't build a whole lot of wiggle room into their valvetrains. They keep the valves pretty tight to maximize performance and a 4g63 IS an interference engine. Note that if you follow the recommendations in this video and damage your valvetrain that I am not responsible. Here I demonstrate all of the techniques to ensure that damage never occurs because these tests are performed PRIOR to the engine ever starting, and prove that clearance is adequate for THE PARTS I SHOW HERE ON CAMERA. There can be components installed in other rotating assemblies that require additional clearance to be built into your valve clearance such as aluminum rods, or other alloys employed in the casting and forging of rotating assembly parts and valves. I strongly urge you to check with those manufacturers for their recommendations regarding thermal expansion, stretch, bounce rocker gap or float prior to making any adjustments, and use this video only as a documentation of my experience. In other words, it's my opinion. What works in your engine will likely be very different from mine, but the tests and the math shown here will work the same with your build. To find your intake valve clearance... Add your intake valve opening degrees (btdc) to your intake valve closing degrees (abdc) to 180°. IO + IC + 180 = DURATION DURATION ÷ 2 = LOBE CENTERLINE LOBE CENTERLINE - IO = INSTALLED INTAKE CENTERLINE To find your Exhaust valve clearance... Add your Exhaust valve opening degrees (bbdc) to your intake valve closing degrees (atdc) to 180°. EO + EC + 180 = DURATION DURATION ÷ 2 = LOBE CENTERLINE LOBE CENTERLINE - EC = INSTALLED Exhaust CENTERLINE To get your Lobe Separation Angle, ADD your INSTALLED INTAKE CENTERLINE to your INSTALLED Exhaust CENTERLINE and divide that result by 2. Intake Centerline + Exhaust Centerline ÷ 2 = LSA Tight Lobe Separation Angles * MOVE TORQUE LOWER IN THE POWER BAND * INCREASE MAXIMUM TORQUE OUTPUT * INCREASE CYLINDER PRESSURE * INCREASE CRANKING COMPRESSION * INCREASE EFFECTIVE COMPRESSION * INCREASE COMBUSTION CHAMBER SCAVENGING EFFECT * SHORTEN YOUR POWER BAND * REDUCE IDLE VACUUM! * REDUCE IDLE STABILITY * INCREASE LIKELIHOOD OF KNOCK! * INCREASE OVERLAP * DECREASE PISTON TO VALVE CLEARANCE! Wide Lobe Separation Angles * MOVE TORQUE HIGHER IN THE POWER BAND * DECREASE MAXIMUM TORQUE OUTPUT * LENGTHEN YOUR POWER BAND * DECREASE CYLINDER PRESSURE * DECREASE LIKELIHOOD OF KNOCK * DECREASE CRANKING COMPRESSION * DECREASE EFFECTIVE COMPRESSION * INCREASE IDLE VACUUM * IMPROVE IDLE STABILITY * DECREASE OVERLAP * DECREASE COMBUSTION CHAMBER SCAVENGING EFFECT * INCREASE PISTON TO VALVE CLEARANCE There's more that I want to say about Lobe Separation Angle (LSA). If you're tuning a DOHC engine with cam gears, you're very lucky to go through all this trouble. The pushrod and SOHC crowd can't change their lobe separation angles without replacing their camshaft, and on many engines that means removing the cylinder heads. On a 4g63 with adjustable gears, you loosen the lock bolts, turn, lock it back down and you've adjusted your LSA. This is a luxury which if you've never had to build a SOHC or a pushrod engine and install camshafts that you take for granted. DOHC tuning permits the ability to alter the opening and closing events of the valves independently of one another and perfect the valve timing during tuning without having to completely remove and replace the valvetrain. What this also means is that the pushrod crowd needs to know and understand a lot more about their camshaft profiles prior to making their purchase as we [the DOHC crowd] do. They have to be on their A-game when they drop the coin on a new cam or else things get expensive really quick. Lobe separation angle says more about how camshafts behave than duration and lift, but all 3 should be carefully scrutinized when you're making that determination. Yes, I did actually animate my engine's valve timing exactly the way HKS said to set it up. Yes those are all actual photos of my parts. Yes that was the biggest Photoshop file I've ever created.





1981 IMSA Kelly American Challenge Limerock
1981 LImerock race -- one of the best Kelly American Challenge races ever.





Cameron Lawrence Racing Trans-Am Road Atlanta 2014
Cameron Lawrence driving the #1 Miller Racing Camaro in Trans-Am TA2 at Road Atlanta 2014. Started 3rd and worked my way to the lead before being taken out in Turn 10 which lead to a bent wheel and flat tire. After going a lap down in the pits I worked my way past the leaders and back on the lead lap to a 7th place finish. I was able to keep my points lead and set a track record in the process. The car that hit me was penalized half of his points for the avoidable contact.





SVRA Historic Trans-Am Race at Watkins Glen 2013
Real Historic Trans-Am Racecars from the best years of American Road Racing. http://svra.com/





Hyundai Assembly 4 - Balancing Rods
I edited this video to its finished state, and RojoDelChocolate handed me a track with no collaboration that was the right length and rhythm. I literally did nothing to the video once the audio track was dropped in, and that's just how it went. I can't believe it. It's like when you're pumping gas into a Ford F150 full-blast and release the pump handle to stop right on $80.00 even. He's got more musical talent in his pinky fingernail than I have mechanical ability in my spleen, appendix and tonsils combined. Thank you RojoDelChocolate. Here I'm cleaning up the fly cuts, balancing the piston and rod assemblies and preparing to double-check my valve clearance. I had to start by cleaning up and re-lubricating every part that was removed to prevent contamination of the assembly. This is the tedious part of doing the job right. We learned that this whole engine assembly was pretty far-gone in previous videos, way past its service limits, so making it fit and work again takes extensive testing, machining, and re-testing to ensure all of the parts fit. This is likely the most challenging build I will perform on any car in my driveway. It has been so far. But because I have not demonstrated the basics of engine balancing beyond what a machine shop has to do to zero balance a flat-plane crankshaft, I thought I'd give it its own video right here with one of the test assemblies. When you balance rods by themselves, you balance the big-end and the pin-bore separately. You get weights of both ends of the rod using a jig and a process that I don't demonstrate in this video. The reason you do this is because the position of the weight behaves differently relative to its distance from the crankshaft pin. Weight on the big end has less of an effect than if there's extra weight on the pin bore. The best balanced engines have every part of the piston and rod assemblies balanced separately within .1 grams using the method I just described, and not the method shown in this video. The method shown here involves weighing ALL of the piston and rod assembly components together, and then taking out the difference just on the casting lines of the connecting rod. They were already off-balance and had never been balanced before. This is an improvement, not perfection. It's still something this engine needed to have done. I'm not using the big-end/small-end method here because these pistons are pressed-on and if I try to remove them from the rod, it will shatter the piston skirts. No thank you. I'm not replacing these pistons. The reason I grind down the casting lines is because it's weight is in a neutral territory, extending from the big end to the small end. It's easier to take an even amount off when you grind across the entire length of the rods. This method leaves a lot up to assumption as there's no way to determine which end of the rod is heavier, or if the weight is in a wrist pin or piston. All this does is ensure the crankshaft is spinning an even amount of weight on all 4 of its rod journals. Grams of weight turn into pounds of force at idle speeds. My goal is to remove that vibration at any and all rotations per minute if I can. So I make them all the same within 1.0 grams of their combined weight. If you're assembling and balancing all NEW parts, not parts that have worn together and need to go back in the same holes... you will have to balance the individual parts and pieces. This is the poor man's method. Even with the new parts you still do the poor man's method once you're done balancing the individual parts and assemble them, but sometimes when you're lucky with the new parts, you can just swap around the rods, pins and fasteners to balance the weights on each assembly and not have to grind anything at all. That's awfully nice when that happens. You know the Hyundai won't let me get away with that. Removing stress risers might help strengthen the rods, but it's not what I'm after here or else I would have removed the whole casting line from all of them. These rods should be fine for my goals. My goal is to remove just enough from all of the fatter rods (weight wise) to match the lightest one. Balancing an inline 4 engine with a flat-plane crank is easy if you have already balanced the crankshaft. This crank was already balanced for the GSX motor on a previous occasion. It's zero'd out. In order to balance the rotating assembly, all you do is make the piston and rod assemblies weigh identically to its neighbors. Just 3 grams of weight can produce over a hundred pounds of lateral forces at red-line so this is an aspect of engine building that you should not overlook. All you need to do is get all of them within 1 gram. The scale I'm using measures whole grams, so that's all I can do anyway. This method is acceptable for balancing a rotating assembly as long as you're smart about how to remove the weight.





Laguna Seca Motorsports Reunion Trans Am Race, August17, 2013
Ist part...first 12 minutes of Historic Laguna Seca Race 2013, Gary Goeringer, driving Bill Maier '68 Mustang Coupe....started 6th...enjoy





Trans-Am Series Racing Cars: 2010 Monterey Historics Part 2 of 2: Track
1966-1972 Trans-Am racing cars on the track. Check this video too. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YruA8hxPgOA





1966 - 1972 Trans-Am Cars Laguna Seca
Trans-Am cars race from the monterey historics





Part 1-Motor Sports Reunion Trans Am Qualifying Race, Laguna Seca, 11:30 AM, August 17, 2013
Part 1-first 17 minutes from Go Pro 3 Dash Cam of 9th place starter, Ken Epsman, in the #2, Penske built, 1970/71 Javelin...in 1971, a 2nd team, led by Roy Woods, campaigned factory Javelins, together with Penske...Graciously, Penske gave this particular '70 Javelin to Roy Woods' team, who campaigned this car, rebodied as a 1971 Javelin, in the '71 Trans Am series. Additionally, Penske shared with Woods all the Javelin R&D work Penske's team produced during the 1970 season. Driver's of this famous Trans-Am Javelin include Mark Donohue and Peter Revson, for Penske. During ''71, again Peter Revson, with Tony Adamowicz, Vic Elford, George Follmer, and Roy Woods himself. The following year, Roy Woods again drove, teaming with George Follmer, the latter going on to win the 1972 Trans Am championship...





Which car is faster? Which Car is Faster?




Similar 1/4 mile timeslips to browse:

2011 Nissan 370Z Nismo Greedy TT: 11.520 @ 123.000
Edwin Colon, Engine: 3.7vhr, Turbos: greedy


2009 Nissan 370Z base + sports pkg: 12.245 @ 111.810
Jason, Engine: 3.7l,


1974 Jensen Interceptor MK 111: 12.512 @ 108.930
Tony Morgan, Engine: 440 ci, Tires: Street ET's


1973 Jensen Interceptor MkIII: 12.710 @ 110.200
Gnter Duacsek, Engine: 500ci BB Chrysler, Tires: 8inch Hoosier slicks


2009 Nissan 370Z sports Stillen intake and exhaust: 12.800 @ 110.330
steve, Engine: 3.7, Tires: 275 35 19


2009 Nissan 370Z : 12.841 @ 108.700
kevin britt, Engine: 3.7 VQ37HR, Tires: sumitomo htr ii summer


2009 Nissan 370Z : 12.880 @ 108.990
Eighties Metal,


2009 Nissan 370Z base: 12.938 @ 108.310
jacob,


2009 Nissan 370Z Base 6 Spd Manual: 12.942 @ 106.800
Chuck, Engine: 3.7 VHR, Tires: M/T ET Streets 26x10.5


2009 Nissan 370Z sport: 12.953 @ 108.320
steve, Engine: 3.7, Tires: 305 35 18 drag radials


2009 Nissan 370Z Touring/Sport: 12.984 @ 108.870
Dan, Engine: 3.7l, Tires: Street Bridgstones


2009 Nissan 370Z Touring 7AT: 12.986 @ 107.460
Shahid, Engine: VQ37VHR,


2009 Nissan 370Z Sport Touring: 13.007 @ 107.190
TBSS2008, Engine: 3.7 V6, Tires: 275-35-19 F 305-30-19 R (Street)


1993 Volvo 940 : 13.065 @ 104.150
Derrick Wooten, Engine: 2.3 turbo, Turbos: 15g


2009 Nissan 370Z Base A/T : 13.074 @ 106.380
Robb Honea, Engine: 3.7 L V-6, Tires: Toyo


2009 Nissan 370Z Base w/ Sport Package 6MT: 13.127 @ 105.270
Ray, Engine: Stillen oil cooler,


2009 Nissan 370Z Base 7AT: 13.164 @ 106.780
Kevin Cho,


2009 Nissan 370Z 7AT Sport Touring: 13.165 @ 108.850
TBSS2008, Engine: VQ37VHR, Tires: NT05 245/40/19 front 275/35/19 rear


1992 Volvo 940 Turbo: 13.200 @ 101.980
John Nobinger, Engine: 2.3L 4 cylinder, Supercharger: None Turbos: Mitsubishi 15g Tires: 225/50/R16 Hankook


2009 Nissan 370Z 370z base 7AT: 13.200 @ 108.000
jtown,


 


©2014 DragTimes - Disclaimer