1G DSM Dual Side Exits

Just a video of my new Dual Side Exits. Ive had my GST almost 8 years now and ive been wanting to do this for a while. I thought it up then put in on paper and measured it exactly how and what i wanted it to look like then a reputable shop 'DTM' brought my dream to reality. let me know what yall think. Mike Valencia

More Videos...

Custom DSM Side Exit Exhaust Talon Eclipse Laser
Custom side exit Exhaust I built for my buddies talon. It has a small race muffler so it is not ungodly loud. Its made out of stainless and tig welded.

9 second turbo 1g awd dsm drag race, Nick Stack 9.6 @ 145 mph
Nick Stack in his 1990 Eclipse GSX making some passes at the Import vs Domestic Event. Nick won the Modified Import Class. Trying out the new JMF Drag sheet metal intake manifold, tune needs some tweaking for that larger plenum over the Magnus but it was still running in the mid 9's. Inaugural Liberty Engines Import vs Domestic Shootout at New England Dragway. 6/23/2012 - Epping, NH New England DSM

Valve Cover Modification and Polishing
Crankcase ventilation in a nutshell: High cylinder pressures are achieved both on the compression and combustion strokes. As gasses are compressed and exploded, the rings do the best they can with extremely close tolerances (and oil) to hold all that pressure in... but some still makes it past the rings. That's called blow-by. Blow-by is why all combustion engines are inefficient by design, and why they have crankcase breather systems. Blow-by contains air, water (humidity), fuel, carbon and nitrogen. You don't really want all that stuff in your oil, as they all contribute to oil viscosity breakdown. A breather system works to extract those gasses from the crankcase so they don't condensate into the oil. It does this by connecting the car's air intake system to the crankcase so that blow-by can be re-burnt and transformed into oxides that the catalytic converter can easily break down. As an engine gets worn, the physical capability of the rings to hold that pressure in is reduced. This results in more blow-by and higher crankcase pressure. High crankcase pressure is bad because it prevents the rings from sealing properly, and can also blow oil seals like valve cover gaskets, front case and rear main seals, etc... as that air tries to escape. This is a fire hazard. Oil burns and it's hard to put out. One of the most common tell-tale signs of high crankcase pressure on a DSM is having to zip-tie your dipstick down. If it's getting blown out, then there's excess pressure pushing it out because it has nowhere to go. Also, on an engine that's holding higher crankcase pressure, that pressure works against your oil pressure, and reduces oil flow to all points in the oil system. The factory DSM crankcase has 2 ventilation systems. Two. One is a PCV system (Positive Crankcase Ventilation), and the other one is just a simple breather. The PCV system is connected to the intake manifold, and the breather is connected to the air intake in front of the turbo (or anywhere on the intake in front of the throttle plate on non-turbo cars). The PCV valve is designed to CLOSE OFF the port between the crankcase and the intake manifold when the engine is under load (Boost). When higher pressure is in the intake than the crankcase, a valve snaps shut preventing you from Boosting your crankcase. When you are at idle/cruise (vacuum), it pops open letting those gasses get vacuumed out of the crankcase. Vacuum. The breather always vents back into the intake pre-turbo or pre-throttle plate. That airway is always open. Neither port on either the PCV or the breather are bigger than 1/4", so as much air as you can fit through a single 1/4" hole when you're under Boost... that's all the blow-by it can extract from the crankcase. That might be fine for an 11 PSI factory car, but when some tweaker wants to flow 30, 40, 50+ pounds of Boost, this is a system which is frequently overlooked and in desperate need of attention. You might as well look at your Boost controller as a blow-by increaser if that makes any sense. You gotta get those gasses out of the crankcase. Crankcase pressure is bad. I'm not going to cover vacuum pumps, venturis or other methods of creating vacuum pressure in the crank case because these advanced techniques are for racing applications with dry-sump oil systems which DSMs do not have from the factory, and few people need. Aside from the rings, only worn valve seals can contribute to high crankcase pressure, and that usually causes increased oil consumption that's visible (oil smoke) on cold starts and as the car rolls into high Boost after long periods of vacuum. Some people have tools that can allow them to change the valve seals without removing the cylinder head (if the rings are known to be good), but that's far more time consuming and less complete of a fix than removing and rebuilding the cylinder head. If the rings and cylinder bores are in bad shape, then it's a waste of money. Someone who's performed compression and leak-down tests has determined which parts are bad already. As far as the rest goes, I bypassed my PCV system entirely. There is no vacuum scavenging of gasses from the crankcase on my car. It eliminates the chance of a PCV valve failing and Boosting my crankcase, and since I have a catch can, excessive blow-by is still being captured through condensation. I installed two 3/8" breather ports which flows more than 8 times the air that the original ones could flow. That should prevent pressure from ever building up. The -8AN fittings are compression fittings that don't require gaskets and are extremely easy to work with. They create an airtight seal to my Greddy catch can which I had modified to accept 2 extra fittings. One is plugged. The other has a 5/8" line to the turbine intake to extract gasses back to the engine like it was originally designed to do.

Driving the VR4 through a tunnel
Having a lil fun driving though ole Washburn Tunnel with TCR Skye.