Port Match and Polishing Cylinder Heads

This is a continuation of the custom intake manifold video. This video is about port matching and polishing both the intake manifold and aluminum cylinder heads for a Ford 351W.

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DIY Cylinder Head Porting Gains 92 Horsepower! - Engine Masters Ep. 21
This episode of Engine Masters presented by AMSOIL reinforces the fact that Steve Dulcich is not just the guy in the back of the Dyno room—he’s a legit engine master. And you won’t question that after you see his homegrown porting job on a set of Edelbrock aluminum cylinder heads for a small-block Mopar pick up a whopping 92 hp! To be fair, that gain also includes porting work on the Victor Jr. intake manifold by Bryce Mulvey. All this work tops off the same 410ci small-block Mopar from BluePrint Engines that was seen on Engine Masters Episodes 11 and 18. Engine Masters is supported by AutoMeter, Mr. Gasket and Earl's Vapor Guard. Subscribe now to make sure you're in on all the action! https://www.motortrendondemand.com/subscribe/30-day-free-trial/?bnr=organic :bnr:yt:em:ep21_fe_de:link:na:mtod Facebook -http://facebook.com/motortrendmag & http://facebook.com/HotRodEngineMasters Instagram @EngineMasters





INTAKE MANIFOLD TO CYLINDER HEAD PORT MATCHING PROCESS
In this video we discuss the steps needed to achieve proper intake manifold and cylinder head port matching. This step will improve performance in the engine by improving air/fuel flow to the cylinders.





How To Get Free Horsepower: Porting Your Own Cylinder Heads & Intake
How to get a few extra horsepower for free when rebuilding and engine. Port your own cylinder heads and intake. You can do it yourself if you have a good air compressor, die grinder, and bits. It will take a lot of time, especially your first set. I have seen someone gain almost 100 horsepower just from porting. That isn't typical however.





Cylinder Head 204 - Porting & Polishing
This is a first-generation 1992 1.6L Hyundai Elantra small-combustion-chamber head. Thats what it is. It's a J1 Elantra cylinder head. Good luck finding another one like it. (read more)... In Cylinder Head 106 I talked about the mainstream porting theories as they are discussed. We looked at a cylinder head that I have thousands of dollars of professional work performed on, and a bone-stock second-generation head that I didn't port. In this video I just might do something you haven't seen done before. For some, that may be uncomfortable. The port and polish job I perform here is what I think will work best for my current build. This is not an extreme killer port job. What will be different here is where port textures are concerned, I will be following the advice of a reputable source that will remain un-named. You're free to port yours differently than I do in this video, and I give you that out, around the 20 minute marker. The Hyundai is far from being an ultimate-performance build. It's a $400 box of scraps with nothing but time invested. It's perfect for this video. My finished product WILL be an improvement over what I had. I don't yet have access to a flow bench. I still have an achievement to un-lock. As far as you should be concerned with the techniques I employ... without flow numbers there is no evidence of what this will do, but we will gather lots of info from dynp sessions and drag strip time slips. If I could test it on a flow bench, I would. There are MANY, and when I say many, I mean thousands of flame war mongering pirates floating around on rough seas with a hair trigger cannon finger itching to fire if you port a head any differently than what the herd mentality says to do while porting a cylinder head. I cover the herd mentality because it has merit. It's been tested. Tried and true. But I don't follow it to the letter of the law. I'm definitely not here to de-bunk it. I would port a cylinder head differently for each build based on how that engine was used. There's an extremely valid reason why relating to air speed. It's not the texture of a port that maximizes the effect of fuel atomization, but the velocity of the air running through an x or y sized valve. The driving factor in this is the piston speed. I'm not going to give you the technical information, but will refer you to information about the Lovell factor. There's a better description of this in the links below, and even a calculator to help you find your engine's sweet spot. Why the Lovell factor is important: https://www.highpowermedia.com/blog/3346/the-effect-of-valve-size Lovell gas factor calculator: http://www.rbracing-rsr.com/lovellgascalc.html Only people who have flow testing equipment know for sure what really works and have the capability to produce a perfectly-matched port job for the ultimate performance build. Those guys know the definition of ultimate, and THEY are floating below the water Aegis-class submarines ready to blow your comment up if you don't know what you're talking about. They don't care if you're an armchair mechanic or a herd of pirates. I will say, they're zoomed in pretty close on me right now, and I'm expecting to take a few hits. My work will be tested based on Dyno and drag strip performance, and the results will be posted here. Fortunately, those kinds of videos are a WHOLE LOT EASIER TO MAKE!!!




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