Limit Pushing - Pontiac Grand Prix 0-60 Test

2001 Pontiac Grand Prix SE 0-60 Test The Pontiac Grand Prix: The Pontiac Grand Prix is was first introduced in 1962 as a full-sized automobile. John De Lorean put a great deal of development into the original Grand Prix, which was seen in the full sport options. The Grand Prix went through six generations until its update as the seventh generation on the GM W platform in 2004. The seventh generation was split into four options groups with the first groups sporting the series III 3800 200 hp V6 engine and the last two groups (the competition groups) hosting a series III 3800 with a Supercharger installed to bring the hp up to 260 hp. The seventh generation suffered declining sales and the car was eventually phased out into the G8 before Pontiac's demise.

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Limit Pushing - 2000 Ford Mustang V6 0-60 Test
-High Flow Intake -Without Muffler The Ford Mustang: The Ford Mustang was initially based on the second generation Ford Falcon, a compact car. The Mustang came to be the first of the "pony car" sports class. The creation of the Mustang led to a race for positions on the pony car class. GM's response came in the form of the Chevrolet Camaro, AMC's was the Javelin, and Chrysler's reinvention of Plymouth Barracuda. The Mustang was also the inspiration for the Toyota Celica coupé. The 1965 Mustang was introduced to the public in 1964 at the New York World's Fair. It is Ford's third oldest nameplate currently in production next to the F-Series pickup truck line. The Mustang prototype was a two-seat, mid-mounted engine roadster, and was equipped with a V4 engine. The two-seat design was abandon due to the low sales in with the 2-seat 1955 Thunderbird. A Fastback 2+2 model replaced the trunk space for increased interior space. The original Mustang made its first movie appearance in the James Bond film Goldfinger in September 1964. At a price of $2,368 Original sales forecasts projected less than 100,000 units for the first year. This mark was easily surpassed and 418,000 would eventually be sold during the model year. In its first eighteen months, more than one million Mustangs were built. The second generation Mustang came in the 1970s during the creation of stringent pollution laws and the 1973 OPEC oil embargo. These changes greatly affected the pony car generation and definitely the new Mustang. The Mustang was adopted to the new condition with a redesign based on the Ford Pinto subcompact. The new model was badged the "Mustang II" and introduced right before the first Energy Crisis in 1973. This version was smaller than the original and heavier due to the addition of new U.S. emission and safety equipment necessary to meet regulations. The car was available in coupe and hatchback versions. Engine changes included the intro of the 1975 5.0 L, the 1976 Cobra II, and the 1978 King Cobra. The third generation Mustang was based on the larger Fox platform developed for the 1978 Ford Fairmont and Mercury Zephyr. The available trim levels now included L, GL, GLX, LX, GT, turbo GT, SVO, Cobra, and Cobra R. The new Mustang variant was designed to be fuel conscious and based on the Mazda MX-6. After a backlash from Mustang enthusiasts on the proposed idea, the 1987 Mustang would receive a major facelift and the MX-6 variant became the Ford Probe. The fourth generation of the Mustang came about in 1994. It was based on an updated version of the rear-wheel drive Fox platform with a 3.8 OHV V6 rated at 145 bhp and a 4.6 L SOHC V8 rated at 215 bhp but was later increased to 225 bhp. In 1999, the Mustang was redesigned with Ford's New Edge styling theme. The Mustang's engines were carried over for the 1999 model, but benefitted from a new split-port induction system and a new head design. These changes resulted in 190 bhp V6 engine and a 260 bhp V8. The fifth generation Mustang was based on an all-new D2C platform for the 2005 model year which echoed the fastback Mustangs of the late 1960s. The base model is powered by a 210 hp 4.0 L SOHC V6 while the GT was powered by a 4.6 L SOHC 3-valve V8 with variable camshaft timing (VCT) producing 300 hp. In 2010, Ford unveiled a redesigned Mustang prior to the Los Angeles International Auto Show. The 2010 Mustang remains on the D2C platform and mostly retains the previous-year's drivetrain options. The Mustang received a thoroughly revised exterior, with only the roof panel being retained, that is sculpted for a leaner, more muscular appearance and better aerodynamic performance with the coefficient of drag being reduced by 4% on V6 models and 7% on GT models. For the 2011 Mustang, Ford revised the current Mustang engines. The new V6 is a smaller 3.7L 305 hp aluminum block engine weighing 40 lb lighter than the previous version. The 4.6L 24V V8 was replaced by a new 5.0L 32V V8 which produces 412 hp. The 2011 Shelby GT500's 5.4L block is now made out of aluminum and makes 550 hp while weighing 102 lb lighter than the previous engine.





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