Mercedes Benz CLK-GTR #1 0f 25

#1 OF 25 Mercedes Benz CLK-GTR ,Specifications: 720bhp, 7.3-liter dual overhead cam naturally aspirated V12 engine, six-speed sequential manual gearbox with paddle-shift operation, double wishbone with push-rod, actuated coil spring with shock absorber front and rear suspension, and four-wheel vented carbon fiber disc brakes with anti-lock braking system. Wheelbase: 105.1 Value $2,000,000, More info here http://www.rmauctions.com/CarDetails.cfm?SaleCode=MO07&CarID=r343&Currency=

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Alan Johnson Super Hemi G Force Cuda
Alan Johnson 1971 Super Hemi G Force Cuda link here www.johnsonshotrodshop.com





Mercedes Benz CLK-GTR #1 0f 25
#1 OF 25 Mercedes Benz CLK-GTRSpecifications: 720bhp, 7.3-liter dual overhead cam naturally aspirated V12 engine, six-speed sequential manual gearbox with paddle-shift operation, double wishbone with push-rod, actuated coil spring with shock absorber front and rear suspension, and four-wheel vented carbon fiber disc brakes with anti-lock braking system. Wheelbase: 105.1 , Value $2,000,000 Mercedes Benz CLK-GTR Value $2million, More info here http://www.rmauctions.com/CarDetails.cfm?SaleCode=MO07&CarID=r343&Currency= and McLaren F1 LM, Maserati MC12, Bugatti Veyron





1930 CORD MODEL L-29 TOWN CAR
1930 CORD MODEL L-29 TOWN CAR Sold for US$ 1,760,000 Including Commission Coachwork by Murphy & Co. From the Estate of Jay Hyde, owned for more than 55 years Chassis no. 2926823 Engine no. FD 2410 298.6ci L-Head Inline 8-Cylinder Engine Updraft Schebler Carburetor 125hp 3-Speed Manual Transmission Leaf Spring Suspension 4-Wheel Hydraulic Drum Brakes, with Inboard Front Brakes *Rare custom bodied Cord L-29 *One of four L-29 Murphy Town Cars built, only short wheelbase to survive *Famed Hollywood history car *Remarkable unrestored and well-preserved example *An ACD Club Category No.1 Certified car THE CORD L-29 Errett Lobban Cord introduced the L-29 in 1929 as a gap-filling model priced between his Cord Corporation's Auburn and Duesenberg lines, the latter being totally redesigned that year. Powered by a straight-eight 'flat head' engine built by Lycoming – another of Cord's companies – the L-29 featured front-wheel drive, then much in vogue at Indianapolis. An avid race fan, Cord had been impressed by the performance of the Harry Miller-designed front-wheel-drive Junior 8 Special, and in 1926 purchased the passenger-car rights to Miller's fwd designs. Cornelius Van Ranst was hired to assist with development, and by November 1927 the first prototype was ready for testing and assessment by Fred Duesenberg, Cord's Chief Engineer. Staff designer Al Leamy contributed the stylish coachwork, which was underpinned by Van Ranst's X-braced chassis frame – the world's first. Production of the new car, now dubbed 'L-29', commenced at the Auburn, Indiana plant in April 1929 with a two-day press launch in June. The advantages conferred by the L-29's front-wheel-drive layout, chiefly, a low centre of gravity and increased passenger space, were immediately apparent; while the freedom its low-slung frame gave coachbuilders meant that the Cord was soon attracting the attention of master craftsmen on both sides of the Atlantic. Indeed, many connoisseurs consider the L-29 to be the most stylish American car of the period. The L-29 was offered initially in Sedan, Brougham, Convertible Coupé and Phaeton versions, at prices ranging from $3,095 to $3,295. Unfortunately for Cord, just as his new baby was reaching dealers' showrooms the Wall Street Crash of October 1929 blew away a huge proportion of his intended clientele. Despite a program of price cuts, sales never took off and the world's first practical front-wheel-drive production car was discontinued in 1932. Including cars supplied in chassis form to independent coachbuilders, only 5,010 L-29s were built, of which it is thought that around 300 of all types exist today. Among all Classic Era automobiles, only very few Cords were actually supplied to coachbuilders, as a result of the timing of the depression and owing to the fact that Cord themselves offered factory body styles. This makes Custom bodied Cords not only exceedingly beautiful, but also incredibly rare. Those that do survive, such as the Count Alexis de Sakhnoffsky Coupé, have always been prized. More Info Here: http://www.bonhams.com/auctions/22530/lot/135/ Robert Myrick Photography





Indianapolis Speedway Gasoline Alley, Vintage Racing
Indianapolis Speedway Gasoline Alley, Vintage Racing The Brickyard Vintage Racing Invitational returns to the Indianapolis Motor Speedway for the second consecutive year. This year, more than 500 vintage and historic race cars will compete on the road course and famed 2.5-mile oval. The event will showcase a wide variety of racing cars, including those that competed in past Indianapolis 500s, NASCAR Sprint Cup and Nationwide Series, Formula One, Grand-Am, SCCA, and Trans-Am events. American manufacturers Chevrolet and Ford compete against famous European rivals like Ferrari, Porsche, Jaguar, and MG in SVRA’s 11 racing groups. The popular Indy Legends Pro-Am Charity race will return on Saturday, June 13th, pairing veteran Indianapolis 500 drivers with amateur racing partners for a 45-minute race on the road course. Cars competing in the Legends Pro-Am Charity race will be 1963–1972 Chevrolet Corvettes, Camaros, and Ford Mustangs. The Road Circuit will be revised in 2015 to provide a better track experience for the competitor. This year there will be a Car Show on the golf course on the IMS grounds with over 1000 cars expected to participate in the activities. SVRA salutes multiple great racing legends at The Brickyard in 2014. The 50th Anniversary of Jimmy Clark’s first Indy 500 win will be celebrated with a display in front of the Pagoda. The Unser Family Reunion is also planned, with Al Unser Sr., Al Unser Jr., Bobby Unser, and Robby Unser in attendance. http://www.svra.com/events/2015-brickyard-vintage-racing-invitational/ https://www.indianapolismotorspeedway.com/events/vintage Robert Myrick Photography Shot With Samsung Galaxy S4




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