1982 YAMAHA xj550 CAFE RACER

Me and my dad built this 82 Yamaha Maxim xj550 that we bought. We did a bunch of custom work here in our two car garage. The list of things done to the bike is quite long so I'm not gonna get in too much detail but if you have a question about the bike let me know and I'll try to get to you and answer it. Enjoy and thank you much for watching Jorge jr Music by: mi6 Song: Stupid Little Things

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AWESOME CAFE RACER VIDEO
A café racer (/ˈkæf reɪsər/ kaf-ray-sər or less commonly /ˈkæfi ˌreɪsər/ ka-fi-ray-sər) is a light-weight, lightly-powered motorcycle optimized for speed and handling rather than comfort — and optimized for quick rides over short distances.[1][2] With bodywork and control layout recalling early 1960's Grand Prix road racing motorcycles, café racers are noted for their low slung racing handlebars, prominent seat cowling and elongated fuel tanks, often with indentations to allow the rider's knees to grip the tank.[3] The term developed among British motorcycle enthusiasts of the early 1960s, specifically the Rocker or "Ton-Up Boys" subculture where the bikes were used for short, quick rides between cafés — in other words, drinking establishments.[4][3][5][6] Writing in 2005, motorcycle journalist Peter Egan suggested the genesis of the term to the 1960s.[7] In 1973, American freelance writer Wallace Wyss, contributing to Popular Mechanics magazine, wrote that the term café racer was originally used derogatorily in Europe to describe a "motorcyclist who played at being an Isle of Man road racer" and was, in fact, "someone who owned a racy machine but merely parked it near his table at the local outdoor cafe."[8] In 2014, journalist Ben Stewart described the café racer as a "look made popular when European kids stripped down their small-displacement bikes to zip from one café hangout to another."[9] Typical configuration[edit] 1962 racing motorcycle AJS 7R 350cc, on display at Gruber Museum in Weiler im Allgäu, Bavaria, Germany BSA Goldstar 500 café racer In addition to its characteristic light-weight and lightly-powered engine and distinctive bodywork, the café racer typically featured distinctive ergonomics. Low, narrow handlebars — known as clip-ons (two separate bars that bolt directly to each fork tube), clubman or ace bars (one piece bars that attach to the standard mounting location but drop down and forward)[4] — enabled the rider to "tuck in", reducing wind resistance and improving control. Along with the rearward located seat, the posture often required rearsets, or rear-set footrests and foot controls, again typical of racing motorcycles of the era.[10] Distinctive half or full race-style fairings were sometimes mounted to the forks or frame.[8] The bikes featured minimalist styling, engines tuned for maximum speed and light road handling. A well-known example was "The Triton", a homemade combination of the Norton Featherbed frame and a Triumph Bonneville engine. It used a common and fast racing engine combined with a well-handling frame, the Featherbed frame by Norton Motorcycles.[10] Those with less money could opt for a "Tribsa"—the Triumph engine in a BSA frame. Other combinations such as the "Norvin" (a Vincent V-Twin engine in a Featherbed frame) and racing frames by Rickman or Seeley were also adopted for road use.[7] Evolution[edit] 1977 Harley-Davidson XLCR Café racer styling evolved throughout the time of their popularity. By the mid-1970s, Japanese bikes had overtaken British bikes in the marketplace, and the look of real Grand Prix racing bikes had changed. The hand-made, frequently unpainted aluminium racing fuel tanks of the 1960s had evolved into square, narrow, fibreglass tanks. Increasingly, three-cylinder Kawasaki two-strokes, four-cylinder four-stroke Kawasaki Z1, and four-cylinder Honda engines were the basis for café racer conversions. By 1977, a number of manufacturers had taken notice of the café racer boom and were producing factory café racers, such as the well-received Moto Guzzi Le Mans[11] and the unpopular but unforgettable Harley-Davidson XLCR.[12][13][14] A Japanese thumper introduced in the late 1980s (to disappointing sales) the Honda GB500 'Tourist Trophy' emulated British café racers of the 1960s.[15] In the mid-1970s, riders continued to modify standard production motorcycles into so-called "café racers" by simply equipping them with clubman bars and a small fairing around the headlight. A number of European manufacturers, including Benelli, BMW, Bultaco and Derbi produced factory "café" variants of their standard motorcycles in this manner,[16] without any modifications made to make them faster or more powerful,[17] a trend that continues today.[18][19]





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CUSTOM BOBBER CB100
JUST NEED A LITTLE SPIRIT, YOU CAN MAKE SOMETHING FROM SCRATCH. THANKS A LOT TO BAYU, WHO RISK HIS LIFE FOR TEST DRIVE





Test Driving an '82 Yamaha | Cafe Racer
The Bostrom test drive a 1982 70's-inspired Yamaha Verago 750. Check out more awesome video: http://velocity.discovery.com/videos/




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