Front Engine Dragster

BIrd's Eye View from the Injection Stack of my Front Engine Dragster. I actually got a teeny tiny amount of air under the front wheels during the burnout - that may be a first.

More Videos...


4-ΑΩ TIN GOD! WHEELS UP BURNOUT! CRAZY PASS! 100% ORIG! 120" SLINGSHOT DRAGSTER!
John Metler's 100% all original "4-ΑΩ Tin God" Jr. Fuel Dragster is a survivor that was put away in 1972, only to be resurrected some 40 years later! The 120" wheelbase dragster with a Hilborn Injected 301ci with original rear gear, along with the original '67 El Camino push car that was also stored until this year, made an appearance at the Hunnert Car Heads Up Inaugural Event at Byron Dragway 9-12-15. First and only pass, straight off the trailer, results in a chassis flexing, wheels off the ground burnout and an insane wheel hopping pass, harkening back to the 60's with a 9.93@143.09mph!





Drag Racing Crashes Compilation Dragster Altered Gasser Cars Video
Drag Racing Crashes Compilation Race Wrecks Accidents Nitro Top Fuel Dragster Videos Carnage Fest Wild Rides A vintage scariest drag racing crashes and drag race accident compilation transferred from VHS and filmed during the 1990s at various drag strips including California Hot Rod Reunion at Famoso Raceway in Bakersfield, California; Las Vegas Motor Speedway; Brown County Dragway in Bean Blossom, Indiana; and Southwest International Raceway in Tucson, Arizona. None of the drivers were seriously injured. NHRA Non-stop Thrills and Spills; Racing Bloopers and Breakdowns. Gassers cars drag racing. March Meet Bakersfield Brett Harris driving the Nitro Thunder top fuel dragster against Bill Dunlap in Mike Fuller's entry; wild burnout by Woody Wilhelm in his Fatal Attraction 1969 Camaro; Dave Uyehara; Dan Pettinato; and Kelly Wood. Goodguys March Meet. epic race car fail. NHRA How a Top Fuel Dragster Works. Top Fuel dragsters are the quickest accelerating racing vehicles in the world and the fastest sanctioned category of drag racers, with the fastest competitors reaching speeds of 335 miles per hour (539 km/h) and finishing the 1,000 foot (305 m) runs in 3.7 seconds. Because of the speeds, this class almost exclusively races to only a 1,000 foot (305 m) distance, and not the traditional 1⁄4 mile (402 m). The rule was changed in 2008 by the National Hot Rod Association following the fatal crash of Funny Car driver Scott Kalitta during a qualifying session at Old Bridge Township Raceway Park in Englishtown, New Jersey, USA. The shortening of the distance was used in the FIA at some tracks, and as of 2012 is now the standard Top Fuel distance. The Australian National Drag Racing Association is the only internationally recognized sanctioning body that still races Top Fuel dragsters at the earlier 1,320 feet (402 m) standard distance for the majority of races for such events. A top fuel dragster accelerates from a standstill to 100 miles per hour (160 km/h) in as little as 0.8 seconds (less than one third the time required by a production Porsche 911 turbo to reach 60 mph (97 km/h))[1] and can exceed 450 km/h (280 mph) in just 200 metres (660 ft). This subjects the driver to an average acceleration of about 39 m/s2 (4.0 g0) over the duration of the race and with a peak of over 5.6 g. NHRA regulations limit the composition of the fuel to a maximum of 90% nitromethane (Since 2015); the remainder is largely methanol. However, this mixture is not mandatory, and less nitromethane may be used if desired. Kenny Bernstein was the first drag racer in NHRA history to break 300 mph (480 km/h) in such a class of car on the 1⁄4 mi (402 m) at the Gatornationals on March 21, 1992, and Tony Schumacher the first over 310 mph (500 km/h) under the new rules established in 2008 with the shorter strip.[3] While nitromethane has a much lower energy density (11.2 MJ/kg) than either gasoline (44 MJ/kg) or methanol (22.7 MJ/kg), an engine burning nitromethane can produce up to 2.3 times more power than an engine burning gasoline. This is made possible by the fact that, in addition to fuel, an engine must burn oxygen in order to generate force: 14.7 kg of air (21% oxygen) is required to burn one kilogram of gasoline, compared to only 1.7 kg of air for one kilogram of nitromethane, which, unlike gasoline, already has oxygen in its molecular composition. This means that an engine can burn 8.7 times more nitromethane than gasoline. Nitromethane also has a high latent heat of vaporization, meaning that it will absorb substantial engine heat as it vaporizes, providing an invaluable cooling mechanism. The laminar flame speed and combustion temperature are higher than gasoline at 0.5 m/s and 2400 °C respectively. Power output can be increased by using very rich air fuel mixtures. This is also something that helps prevent pre-ignition, something that is usually a problem when using nitromethane. Due to the relatively slow burn rate of nitromethane, very rich fuel mixtures are often not fully ignited and some remaining nitromethane can escape from the Exhaust pipe and ignite on contact with atmospheric oxygen, burning with a characteristic yellow flame. Additionally, after sufficient fuel has been combusted to consume all available oxygen, nitromethane can combust in the absence of atmospheric oxygen, producing hydrogen, which can often be seen burning from the Exhaust pipes at night as a bright white flame. In a typical run the engine can consume between 12 US gallons (45 L) and 22.75 US gallons (86.1 L) of fuel during warmup, burnout, staging, and the quarter-mile run.





GoPro - 8 second Front Engine Dragster
On Board view of my ne2 front engine dragster at 155 mph





Roger Lee's Fueler test 1-30-10
Testing new tune on Hilborn 4 port and 80%




Follow