4G63 back from the ashes---First half of engine rebuild

After over a YEAR of promises that I'd get this vid done, I went halfway and got the engine pull and most of the shortblock work edited and documented. Here for your viewing deliciousness is PART 1! (link to torque specs for the engine here: http://bit.ly/17KDEED)

More Videos...


Building a 4G63T Engine in 10 minutes
Engine building





Danny's 4G63 Engine Build Part 1
Building of a 4G63t engine. Still in the works, so as I make progress, I will continue to add to the video.





Building our "Nasty" 4G63 cylinder head at Force Engineering
This is a Time lapse video of Force Engineering building the "Nasty" 4G63 cylinder head. Video includes Valve job, un-shrouding, porting, decking, cleaning and assembly. All video was taken on site at Force Engineering. Actual time involved was about 10 hours worth of work.





4g63 Balance Shaft Elimination - bearing modification
This is the first part of a two part series about balance shaft elimination on 4g series engines. This video details the bearings, the other video will cover the front case modifications. I've already got a low-def video of the front case mods, and I plan to re-shoot that one in HD when I'm in the assembly phase. It's linked in the video. The balance shafts are designed to cancel out harmonic vibrations caused by combustion and the spinning rotating assembly. They may offer a greater degree of comfort to the driver and passengers, but with that comfort comes a price. Often, when a 4g63 timing belt gives up, it's because the balance shaft belt breaks or comes loose and takes the timing belt out with it. When that happens, it can total your pistons, valves, damage the crankshaft, wrist pins, timing belt tensioner and crank angle sensor. Basically, it can total your motor. The balance shafts also have a combined weigh over 10 lbs and both are driven off the timing belt making them additional and heavy rotating mass. If you've got a lightweight flywheel but still have balance shafts, you have your priorities mixed up. So here's what you do with the bearings. It's easy. You can do this at home. You CAN do it with the motor in the car, BUT DON'T. You must enjoy punishment to do this like that. The end result will slightly increase your oil pressure, but usually not enough to cause concern unless you have a full-circumference bearing turbo, ball bearing turbo--with your oil feed coming off the oil filter housing. The head feed would be better in that case because it's regulated at 15 PSI.




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