Low-speed vehicle crash tests

IIHS news release • May 20, 2010 ARLINGTON, VA - Low-speed vehicles and minitrucks shouldn't share busy public roads with regular traffic More states are allowing a relatively new breed of vehicle on public roads, but crash tests by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety show why the mix of low-speed vehicles (LSVs) or minitrucks and regular traffic is a deadly combination. LSVs are designed for tooling around residential neighborhoods, and minitrucks are for hauling cargo off-road. While these vehicles have a lot of appeal as a way to reduce emissions and cut fuel use, they don't have to meet the basic safety standards that cars and pickups do, and they aren't designed to protect their occupants in crashes. Full text of release at http://www.iihs.org/news/rss/pr052010.html

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1959 Chevrolet Bel Air vs. 2009 Chevrolet Malibu IIHS crash test
IIHS 50th anniversary demonstration test • September 9, 2009 In the 50 years since US insurers organized the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, car crashworthiness has improved. Demonstrating this was a crash test conducted between a 1959 Chevrolet Bel Air and a 2009 Chevrolet Malibu. In a real-world collision similar to this test, occupants of the new model would fare much better than in the vintage Chevy. "It was night and day, the difference in occupant protection," says Institute president Adrian Lund. "What this test shows is that automakers don't build cars like they used to. They build them better." The crash test was conducted at an event to celebrate the contributions of auto insurers to highway safety progress over 50 years. Beginning with the Institute's 1959 founding, insurers have maintained the resolve, articulated in the 1950s, to "conduct, sponsor, and encourage programs designed to aid in the conservation and preservation of life and property from the hazards of highway accidents." More information at http://www.iihs.org





Mini and microcar bumpers
IIHS news release • June 11, 2009 Mini and microcar bumpers allow pricey damage; none of the 7 tested rates good under new system ARLINGTON, VA — Urban drivers often pick mini and microcars because they're affordable, fuel efficient, and easy to park on city streets. Fender-benders are hazards of urban driving, and just one of them can add up to thousands of dollars in repair costs because the bumpers don't adequately protect vehicles from damage. None of the bumpers on 7 mini and microcars the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety recently tested earns the top rating of good, and just 1, the Smart Fortwo, is acceptable. Five out of the 7 earn poor ratings and 1 earns a marginal. Full text of news release: http://www.iihs.org/news/rss/pr061109.html





2013 Volkswagen Beetle small overlap IIHS crash test
2013 Volkswagen Beetle built after March 2013 40 mph small overlap IIHS crash test Overall evaluation: Marginal Full rating at http://www.iihs.org/ratings/rating.aspx?id=1847





Safety consequences of vehicle size and weight
IIHS news release • April 14, 2009 New crash tests demonstrate the influence of vehicle size and weight on safety in crashes; results are relevant to fuel economy policies ARLINGTON, VA — Three front-to-front crash tests, each involving a microcar or minicar into a midsize model from the same manufacturer, show how extra vehicle size and weight enhance occupant protection in collisions. These Insurance Institute for Highway Safety tests are about the physics of car crashes, which dictate that very small cars generally can't protect people in crashes as well as bigger, heavier models. Full text of release at http://www.iihs.org/news/rss/pr041409.html




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