Double Fatal Model A vs Nissan Titan - Graham WA

A sad story from May 7, 2005. The driver and passenger of the Model A were killed when the driver of Titan failed to yeild when making a left turn. The eldery couple was returning home from an antique car event. Several other friends drove past the wreck in their own classic cars. The driver died at the scene. The passenger, his wife died at the hospital. Seats belts might have allowed for a different out come, but were not installed in the Model A. Because of the age of the vehicle, seat belts were not required. I do not know if the driver of the Titan was later charged with anything.

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Open Engine Model A Ford
1929 Ford Model A Open Runner Engine Display. The first thing you will notice is that the engine is on it's side to give a semi-full view of it's moving parts. Next you will see the distributor has been moved upright to give a better view of the pistons and valves. The 4th cylinder is the only working part of the engine. Bearings and pistons are lubricated with grease and oil. Run times are short due to overheating. There is no cooling other than a few holes drilled into the waterjacket by the Exhaust. Yes, I could have made it water-cooled, but it's the start-up that makes the show! Thanks to Lee Bottensek, Art Hoppe, and Joe Thorn of MetalCrafters (www.metalcraftersinc.org) for their donations towards this project.





Fastest 1929 Ford Model "A"
http://www.mat.fi/n_index.php?nav=gallery_view&gallery=project1929fordmodel -a&g=13 From here you find more information and restoration photos of this magnificent automobile. This car might be the fastest and the most expensive Ford Model"A" in the World. Restored By Makela Auto Tuning http://www.mat.fi/





The Definitive 11Foot8 Bridge Crash Compilation
A 10 minute compilation of all crashes uploaded between 2008 and 2016 by 11foot8.com, copyright Jürgen Henn FAQ What is the location of the 11foot8 bridge? 201 Gregson St in Durham, NC (intersection with Peabody St) Why is the bridge so low? This train trestle is about 100 years old. At the time when it was built, there were no standards for minimum clearance. How often do trucks crash into the bridge? On average, about once a month a truck gets visibly damaged at the bridge. However, every day I see trucks that trip the overheight warning lights, stop and turn into the side street. Why don’t they fix it? Depends on who “they” are and on what “fix” means. The North Carolina Railroad Company owns the train trestle, and their concern is primarily with keeping the trains running and keeping them running safely. So their concern is mainly with reducing the impact of the truck crashes on the actual structure of the train trestle. As far as they are concerned, they solved that problem by installing the crash beam. The city of Durham has installed “low clearance” signs on each of the 3 blocks leading up to the trestle (Gregson is a one-way road). There is an “overheight when flashing” sign with flashing lights that are triggered by vehicles that are too tall. Several blocks ahead of the trestle the speed limit is 25 MPH. The folks from the city planning department said that they made an effort to prevent accidents. The North Carolina Dept. of Transportation maintains the road, but not the signage. I suspect they have much bigger problems to deal with statewide than this bridge. Is the clearance signage accurate? The clearance signage displays a maximum safe clearance – and yes, in that sense it is accurate. The actual clearance of the crash beam right in front of the trestle is 11 feet 10.8 inches, which gives it a 2.8 inch safety margin. The MUTCD allows for a maximum of 3 inches difference between the signage and the actual clearance. Metric, please! Would this situation be better if the signage were metric? Well … take a look at his website: 2m40.com (Warning: French. Metric) For the convenience of our metric-only audience, here are the measurements we’re talking about in meters: 11foot8 (11 feet 8 inches) = 3.556 meters 11 feet 10.8 inches = 3.627 meters Safety margin: 7.1 cm (at the crest of the road) Can’t the road be lowered? That would be prohibitively expensive because a sewer main runs just a few feet below the road bed. That sewer main also dates back about a hundred years and, again, at the time there were no real standards for minimum clearance for railroad underpasses. Can’t the bridge be raised? Here, too, the question is who would want to pay the millions of dollars to raise the tracks a couple of feet? To accomplish this, the grade of the tracks would have to changed on both sides of the trestle, probably for several miles. That would require rebuilding all trestles in Durham. And NS would have to shut down this busy track for months. I don’t think they are interested in that idea. Is the signeage inadequate? The signeage is pretty good. Large signs alert driver to the low clearance several blocks before the bridge. Overheight vehicles trip a light switch that turns on flashing warning lights.right at the bridge. Should there be more signeage? It’s hard to see how more “low-clearance” signs will significantly improve the situation. But maybe a different kind of signeage would get the driver’s attention. Could they install a low-clearance bar? A low clearance bar is a bar suspended by chains ahead of the bridge. Overheight vehicles hit that bar first and the noise alerts the driver to to the problem. I understand that this approach has been successful in other places, but it’s not practical here. There are many overheight trucks that have to be able to drive right up to the bridge and turn onto Peabody St. in order to deliver supplies to several restaurants. Making Peabody St inaccessible from Gregson St would make the restaurant owners and the delivery drivers very unhappy. Why are they using yellow flashing lights? Warning lights have to be yellow according to the NC traffic laws. Are the drivers stupid? No idea. They certainly seem distracted and the rental truck drivers are also probably inexperienced. Will insurance cover the damages? Most truck rental insurance policies specifically exclude overhead damage from coverage. However, a good auto insurance or liability insurance might pick up the tab. Check with your agent. Or even better – don’t hit the bridge!





Nissan Titan Horror Story
You won't believe this story. Please read before you buy a Nissan. This repair took 68 days for Nissan to complete and final cost was $8000 and still was not fixed properly. Totally unacceptable for what was basically an Exhaust pipe that fell off. Had this repair been completed in a timely manner at a reasonable price this video never would have been made. This Titan was traded in for a Ford F-150 and when Ford did their inspection before putting it for sale they discovered the truck was still not repaired properly. Last I heard this Titan was sent back to Nissan to get more work done.




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