Good Bye Granny I Love You!

My beloved 1970 Sport Satellite sedan "Granny." Born as a six cylinder car I transformed her (with help from Vic Milano and Stewart Logan) into a fire breathing 440 "sleeper" car. She was nicknamed "Grandmere Demers" as a tribute to Charles Demers' beautful '70 Six Pack Roadrunnner and she even spent two years as a Six Pack car herself. Bought her from Tom Connors in late 1994 with 133,000 miles showing, she leaves with 187,177. God bless you "Granny" I'll always love you and ALWAYS miss you! MAY YOU LIVE FOREVER! http://www.storm.ca/~moparman

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1970 440 Six-Pack Super Bee 610hp
Here's an audio video of my 440 Six Pack Super Bee for sale. For info please visit www.showyourauto.com





1970 Plymouth Roadrunner test drive.wmv
Base model 1970 Plymouth Roadrunner... FK5 Deep Burnt Orange..383 magnum...335hp... single point ignition...727 torqueflite transmission with column shift....standard braking system with drum brakes..Power steering...AM radio.. tachometer,oil, water,and ampmeter needle gauges Bench seats. All standard equipment..... Some modifications to engine, transmission and drivetrain, plus a roadrunner dust trail , hood stripes and sun tach was added. 1st, 2nd, and 3rd plus stopping test was a success. An improved track time is expected.





1970 Superbird & 1972 Cuda Racing On Interstate 75
This is my red, white and blue Superbird back when it was a stock Alpine White Superbird. A group of us were on our way from Detroit, Michigan to Columbus, Ohio for a Mopar show in September of 1985. We all had C.B. radios and I lined up against a buddy of mine in a 1972 Cuda. The footage was shot from another Superbird behind me. The "three count" was given over the C.B. radio.





Fast & Furious 4: Plymouth Road Runner | Edmunds.com
MORE FAST & FURIOUS COVERAGE @ INSIDELINE.COM: http://www.edmunds.com/insideline/do/Features/articleId=144114 Anyone trying to keep the timeline and pink slips of the Fast & Furious universe straight will have their head explode with this car. OK, now try and keep up. At the very end of the third Fast & Furious movie (Tokyo Drift), Dominic Toretto shows up in "Hammer," the well-known 1970 Plymouth Road Runner built by Steve Strope's Pure Vision Design in Simi Valley, California. In the few lines of dialogue Toretto speaks, he explains he got the car from his friend "Han," who had been killed earlier in the movie. So for the fourth film, Hammer had to come back. And miraculously, so does Han. But Hammer isn't owned by Han or Dom in this movie. Instead it's owned by Letty (Michelle Rodriguez). If you want to figure it all out, go ahead. Or, better yet, stop asking questions and enjoy the film. In Tokyo Drift the real, exquisitely detailed, perfectly painted, hugely valuable Hammer was used as Dom's ride. However, since Hammer was going to be, well, hammered, in Fast & Furious, the production car department decided to build replicas. And the "real" Hammer doesn't actually appear in the fourth film at all. The picture car department built three Hammer clones using two 1970 Plymouth Satellites and one actual Road Runner. Unlike the original Hammer, which is a pillarless hardtop, the three replicas were based on two-doors with pillars. To hide the pillars, they were simply painted black. Both Satellites were totaled during production. The real Road Runner - running a 383 with a four-speed - was saved and is in storage. After all, who knows what time traveling is in store for Fast & Furious 5?




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