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How to port and polish a turbo exhaust housing

I'll fill this in later. The "book" I typed in this field before didn't save. Come back later if you want to read more about the theories behind porting and polishing.


 


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Porting an eBay 20g turbocharger
The price of this turbo will make it a popular purchase, so I figured I'd air out some tech about ways to improve it. This thing is not for everybody. I wouldn't feel comfortable bolting it on my car the way it comes out of the box. I could complain about its flaws except that so far absolutely none of them have been a deal-breaker for me. To me it's like an empty canvas. I promise to eat those words if it happens, and share my poop. Usually I can easily correct these flaws myself and so can you. BUT! If this thing turns out to perform well with what I do to it... It could easily be a cheap, quick ticket to an 11-second car. Something you could do with a free running 1g, a hacksaw, and about $500 worth of fuel upgrades. Yeah, that would be ridiculous, and I'm bolting it onto a well-modified car... But that being possible speaks volumes for what a DSM can really do. This is no big deal to me. I'd rather guinea pig my car for you in HD so you guys can decide whether or not you'd spend your money on this. Really it's an experiment because this isn't my daily-driver, and it contributes to building a better Colt. Tools I used involve: Scratch awl Milwaukee model ???? 1/4" straight-shaft electric DIY grinder Cone and ball-shaped double-cut burs 180 grit high-speed flap wheel Dremel with a flex-shaft and a tiny 320-grit flap wheel a zip tie 10mm combination wrench tiny flat-blade screwdriver (00) for the e-clip on the wastegate compressed air





Cylinder Head 204 - Porting & Polishing
This is a first-generation 1992 1.6L Hyundai Elantra small-combustion-chamber head. Thats what it is. It's a J1 Elantra cylinder head. Good luck finding another one like it. (read more)... In Cylinder Head 106 I talked about the mainstream porting theories as they are discussed. We looked at a cylinder head that I have thousands of dollars of professional work performed on, and a bone-stock second-generation head that I didn't port. In this video I just might do something you haven't seen done before. For some, that may be uncomfortable. The port and polish job I perform here is what I think will work best for my current build. This is not an extreme killer port job. What will be different here is where port textures are concerned, I will be following the advice of a reputable source that will remain un-named. You're free to port yours differently than I do in this video, and I give you that out, around the 20 minute marker. The Hyundai is far from being an ultimate-performance build. It's a $400 box of scraps with nothing but time invested. It's perfect for this video. My finished product WILL be an improvement over what I had. I don't yet have access to a flow bench. I still have an achievement to un-lock. As far as you should be concerned with the techniques I employ... without flow numbers there is no evidence of what this will do, but we will gather lots of info from dynp sessions and drag strip time slips. If I could test it on a flow bench, I would. There are MANY, and when I say many, I mean thousands of flame war mongering pirates floating around on rough seas with a hair trigger cannon finger itching to fire if you port a head any differently than what the herd mentality says to do while porting a cylinder head. I cover the herd mentality because it has merit. It's been tested. Tried and true. But I don't follow it to the letter of the law. I'm definitely not here to de-bunk it. I would port a cylinder head differently for each build based on how that engine was used. There's an extremely valid reason why relating to air speed. It's not the texture of a port that maximizes the effect of fuel atomization, but the velocity of the air running through an x or y sized valve. The driving factor in this is the piston speed. I'm not going to give you the technical information, but will refer you to information about the Lovell factor. There's a better description of this in the links below, and even a calculator to help you find your engine's sweet spot. Why the Lovell factor is important: https://www.highpowermedia.com/blog/3346/the-effect-of-valve-size Lovell gas factor calculator: http://www.rbracing-rsr.com/lovellgascalc.html Only people who have flow testing equipment know for sure what really works and have the capability to produce a perfectly-matched port job for the ultimate performance build. Those guys know the definition of ultimate, and THEY are floating below the water Aegis-class submarines ready to blow your comment up if you don't know what you're talking about. They don't care if you're an armchair mechanic or a herd of pirates. I will say, they're zoomed in pretty close on me right now, and I'm expecting to take a few hits. My work will be tested based on Dyno and drag strip performance, and the results will be posted here. Fortunately, those kinds of videos are a WHOLE LOT EASIER TO MAKE!!!





Hyundai Assembly 1 - Blueprint Everything
HOLD ON TIGHT! HERE WE GO! We begin the blueprint and assembly on my 1992 Hyundai Elantra's bastardized 4g63. The parts used in this are from a mash of different brands and models outside of the typical 2.0L 4g63, but the specs and standards I am following for its assembly are for the 2.0L DOHC. If you want to follow along in your service manual to verify what I've done here in this video, the processes we cover here detail pages 11C-95 through 11C-105 of the 1g Overhaul manual. I would prefer you not rip them from the binding and throw them away, relying only on this video for instruction... but rather use this video as a motivational guide, and as a demonstration of the techniques involved in those sections. You gotta do the cooking by the book. I never had any intention of making instructional videos on this particular car, but after it blew up I slowly realized it's actually a better case study for how a 4g63 ticks than anything else in my driveway. There are several reasons for this. One being that it's a mix of parts that shouldn't be bolted together, and the other is that many of you watching my videos aren't trying to build a 600hp engine out of aftermarket parts. You're trying to put back together what used to be your daily driver. This car covers those bases. Don't think for a second I won't go through this same trouble and level of detail for the GSX. I will. When I do, having this information in this video will give you a better understanding on how and why I do things the way I do when I get there. This was the shortest I could condense this video. I've never uploaded a video this long, and I hope I never have to do it again. It took a month to create on cutting-edge equipment, 16 hours to export, and 9 hours for YouTube to process. My script for the voiceover is 6 times longer than the whole script for the movie Pootie Tang. 6 times. Longer. Than a Hollywood movie.





Ball bearing turbos rule
Start up and idles





Which car is faster? Which Car is Faster?




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