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How to port and polish a turbo exhaust housing

I'll fill this in later. The "book" I typed in this field before didn't save. Come back later if you want to read more about the theories behind porting and polishing.


 


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Porting an eBay 20g turbocharger
The price of this turbo will make it a popular purchase, so I figured I'd air out some tech about ways to improve it. This thing is not for everybody. I wouldn't feel comfortable bolting it on my car the way it comes out of the box. I could complain about its flaws except that so far absolutely none of them have been a deal-breaker for me. To me it's like an empty canvas. I promise to eat those words if it happens, and share my poop. Usually I can easily correct these flaws myself and so can you. BUT! If this thing turns out to perform well with what I do to it... It could easily be a cheap, quick ticket to an 11-second car. Something you could do with a free running 1g, a hacksaw, and about $500 worth of fuel upgrades. Yeah, that would be ridiculous, and I'm bolting it onto a well-modified car... But that being possible speaks volumes for what a DSM can really do. This is no big deal to me. I'd rather guinea pig my car for you in HD so you guys can decide whether or not you'd spend your money on this. Really it's an experiment because this isn't my daily-driver, and it contributes to building a better Colt. Tools I used involve: Scratch awl Milwaukee model ???? 1/4" straight-shaft electric DIY grinder Cone and ball-shaped double-cut burs 180 grit high-speed flap wheel Dremel with a flex-shaft and a tiny 320-grit flap wheel a zip tie 10mm combination wrench tiny flat-blade screwdriver (00) for the e-clip on the wastegate compressed air





Cylinder Head 204 - Porting & Polishing
This is a first-generation 1992 1.6L Hyundai Elantra small-combustion-chamber head. Thats what it is. It's a J1 Elantra cylinder head. Good luck finding another one like it. (read more)... In Cylinder Head 106 I talked about the mainstream porting theories as they are discussed. We looked at a cylinder head that I have thousands of dollars of professional work performed on, and a bone-stock second-generation head that I didn't port. In this video I just might do something you haven't seen done before. For some, that may be uncomfortable. The port and polish job I perform here is what I think will work best for my current build. This is not an extreme killer port job. What will be different here is where port textures are concerned, I will be following the advice of a reputable source that will remain un-named. You're free to port yours differently than I do in this video, and I give you that out, around the 20 minute marker. The Hyundai is far from being an ultimate-performance build. It's a $400 box of scraps with nothing but time invested. It's perfect for this video. My finished product WILL be an improvement over what I had. I don't yet have access to a flow bench. I still have an achievement to un-lock. As far as you should be concerned with the techniques I employ... without flow numbers there is no evidence of what this will do, but we will gather lots of info from dynp sessions and drag strip time slips. If I could test it on a flow bench, I would. There are MANY, and when I say many, I mean thousands of flame war mongering pirates floating around on rough seas with a hair trigger cannon finger itching to fire if you port a head any differently than what the herd mentality says to do while porting a cylinder head. I cover the herd mentality because it has merit. It's been tested. Tried and true. But I don't follow it to the letter of the law. I'm definitely not here to de-bunk it. I would port a cylinder head differently for each build based on how that engine was used. There's an extremely valid reason why relating to air speed. It's not the texture of a port that maximizes the effect of fuel atomization, but the velocity of the air running through an x or y sized valve. The driving factor in this is the piston speed. I'm not going to give you the technical information, but will refer you to information about the Lovell factor. There's a better description of this in the links below, and even a calculator to help you find your engine's sweet spot. Why the Lovell factor is important: https://www.highpowermedia.com/blog/3346/the-effect-of-valve-size Lovell gas factor calculator: http://www.rbracing-rsr.com/lovellgascalc.html Only people who have flow testing equipment know for sure what really works and have the capability to produce a perfectly-matched port job for the ultimate performance build. Those guys know the definition of ultimate, and THEY are floating below the water Aegis-class submarines ready to blow your comment up if you don't know what you're talking about. They don't care if you're an armchair mechanic or a herd of pirates. I will say, they're zoomed in pretty close on me right now, and I'm expecting to take a few hits. My work will be tested based on Dyno and drag strip performance, and the results will be posted here. Fortunately, those kinds of videos are a WHOLE LOT EASIER TO MAKE!!!





Porting wastegate / flapper garrett t3
This is a work on a t3 garret. the point is to enlarge the flapper hole of the wastegate flapper and increase the opening angle of this flapper to allow more gas flow. This mod help to counter the Boost creep or the runaway of the turbine and the adverse consequences on the turbo and the "breathing" of a stock turbo working at higher pressure that it was originally made for.





Making the intake Manifold
Just a quick slideshow Video showing how I fabricated the intake plenum for my project....





Ball bearing turbos rule
Start up and idles





Polishing Aluminum (GSX is alive)
Tools: You need a big one that can run for long periods of time. Air tools are out of the question because the compressors that can keep up with air DIY grinders use the equivalence of 100 60-watt incandescent light bulbs while running. Mine uses that much power and it CAN'T keep up. I like straight-shaft electric tools because they use less power than air tools in order to do more work. They spin faster and generally have more torque. Electric drills don't have the RPMs needed to work efficiently because you need heat from friction for the polishing process. Cordless, fo'getaboutit. Bench grinders have plenty of speed, but don't make enough torque. Most bench polishing equipment is built primarily for production, not detail. If you have to polish large simple pieces, they're fine for that. The goal is to use a tool that is efficient enough on what you're polishing to make this seem less like punishment. Quality tools. Dremels are only good for grinding and sanding tiny detail stuff, but larger industrial DIY grinders with a .25" chuck are what you need. Power tools are only acceptable for polishing. Power sanding equipment doesn't have a random orbit and also doesn't leave a grain to allow you to gauge how deep to go, so you can't achieve a polishable surface by mechanical means. You'll also notice that sandpaper for orbital and belt stuff doesn't go beyond 320 grit and it's expensive. With a power tool you will inevitably leave marks too deep to remove by wet sanding with 220 grit. You will pay for cheating. Removing casting marks or rough cast with a flap wheel is not cheating so long as you remove all of the defects evenly and still thoroughly hand-sand the part afterwards. About Sandpaper: Anything goes below 220 grit so long as it's dry. You have to wet-sand everything higher than 220 grit, so both electric power tools and non-wet-sanding paper are ruled out beyond that point. The best finishes are hand-sanded in the crosshatch method shown in this video. If there are stubborn scratches that your sandpaper won't take out, go to a coarser grit and work your way back. Step up only one increment in grit with every grade of sandpaper available until there are no visible scratches in the surface. Skipping a grit will just mean you have to work 4x as hard to do the same work. So 220, 320, 400, 600, 800, 1000, etc... Depending on what grade of aluminum you're working with, you can sometimes get away with sanding the part only to 600 grit. To get the most out of a shine, you have to go beyond 1000 grit. The farther you go with the sandpaper, the less work it will take to polish and maintain. About Rouge: The black rouge, or emery compound, has an abrasive in it. It's also considered a cutting compound. It removes material and makes easy work of oxidation. Because it has an abrasive it can leave directional swirls in the finish that are visible in some lighting conditions. It's an extremely-coarse polish but in many cases can produce a brilliant shine. Brown rouge is a step between black and white. Though unnecessary if you're using black, brown is less aggressive while still having the ability to remove scratches and defects. You can also polish wood with it. White rouge is ideal for precious metals PLUS aluminum. It removes what a jeweler calls a deep scratch, but what an auto enthusiast may consider invisible. If there's a scratch that the black rouge didn't take out, white rouge won't do it. It will however, bring out the most reflective finish in aluminum that you can achieve mechanically. Jeweler's rouge (red) is not for aluminum. Neither is blue or green. Well... blue is universal supposedly. I haven't ever needed it and don't trust it. About polishing wheels: Polishing wheels come in different textures. For black rouge I use hard or triple-stitched flannel wheels. The more stitching, the harder it is. The soft wheels tend to disintegrate quickly. The harder wheels can contribute to swirl-effects in the finish when they become contaminated. Metal polish: I can't say enough good stuff about cheap-old Blue Magic metal polish. Brightens the best white rouge polish jobs and is really easy to work with. Mothers is good. NEV-R-DULL is an amazing product that lifts and cleans almost anything out of metal. Where to get supplies: You can buy rouge by the pound at truck stops. Lots of great polishing supplies can usually be found anywhere where you'll find the rigs. Ask a trucker. Also there's HarborFreight, Eastwood, PJ Tool & Supply, and lots of others. Everything's within google distance.





Performance Chips - Mythbusted
Can you really get an increase of 35 horsepower using a $20 'Performance Chip' from eBay on your car? And how do they work? In this episode of Mighty Car Mods, Marty and Moog find out, with some surprising results... https://www.facebook.com/mightycarmods Stickers, music, magazines and MCM gear: http://www.mightycarmods.com/collections/ Discuss this episode here: http://forums.mightycarmods.com/forum/general-mighty-car-mods-discussion/ge neral-discussion/956779-performance-chips-mythbusted-episode-discussion Also something to note around Mighty Car Mods: we are normal guys and are not trained mechanics. We like to make interesting car mods and show you how we've gone about it, but we can't promise that anything we show you will work for your particular car, or that you won't harm yourself, someone else, your car or your warranty doing it. Please be safe, be responsible and unless you know what you're doing, do not fool around with very serious machinery just because you've seen us make it look so easy. Talk to a qualified mechanic if you are in any doubt.





Boost Leak Testing 202: Hair Spray 1080HD
Why do I know about this? I'm tired of being the one knowing all the weird crap. If everyone knows it, it won't be weird anymore. It will be commonplace. By the time I'm done sealing up all of my own Boost leaks, all of you will also be experts as well. I'm sure most of you would teach me something, too... but you subscribed, so here it comes... something I learned in my travels... Also, thanks Ilya M. I've only heard about it twice in my life. It worked great for the one time I've ever needed it, and I'm a huge fan.





Cutting Excess Guide from ProComp 210 SBC Head, custom Porting Combustion Chambers 4
Part Four of Port modificatins on ProComp 210cc aluminum SBC heads. Guide over hang from installation and correcting the combustion chambers to unshroud the spark plug is a big deal on these heads. China castings leave a lot to be desired, but still with all the work you must do it is still the bargin of the year and is a force to be reckond with when "bang per buck" is needed. The base of the spark plug should not be exposed in the chamber, and any valve guide "Overhang" will obstruck flow and create fuel "sheer" which seperates vapor to droplets that wont burn. Most Big Name companies will not take time to detial these issues as production cost prohibit these mods, so have your local machine shop take apart your heads and look for these problems before you bolt them on your prize engine. www.headbytes.com 615-212-7168





Hyundai Elantra 4g63 Shortblock Assembly
HOLD ON TIGHT! HERE WE GO! We begin the blueprint and assembly on my 1992 Hyundai Elantra's bastardized 4g63. The parts used in this are from a mash of different brands and models outside of the typical 2.0L 4g63, but the specs and standards I am following for its assembly are for the 2.0L DOHC. If you want to follow along in your service manual to verify what I've done here in this video, the processes we cover here detail pages 11C-95 through 11C-105 of the 1g Overhaul manual. I would prefer you not rip them from the binding and throw them away, relying only on this video for instruction... but rather use this video as a motivational guide, and as a demonstration of the techniques involved in those sections. You gotta do the cooking by the book. I never had any intention of making instructional videos on this particular car, but after it blew up I slowly realized it's actually a better case study for how a 4g63 ticks than anything else in my driveway. There are several reasons for this. One being that it's a mix of parts that shouldn't be bolted together, and the other is that many of you watching my videos aren't trying to build a 600hp engine out of aftermarket parts. You're trying to put back together what used to be your daily driver. This car covers those bases. Don't think for a second I won't go through this same trouble and level of detail for the GSX. I will. When I do, having this information in this video will give you a better understanding on how and why I do things the way I do when I get there. This was the shortest I could condense this video. I've never uploaded a video this long, and I hope I never have to do it again. It took a month to create on cutting-edge equipment, 16 hours to export, and 9 hours for YouTube to process. My script for the voiceover is 6 times longer than the whole script for the movie Pootie Tang. 6 times. Longer. Than a Hollywood movie.





Calculate Your Compression Ratio
This is everything you need to do to calculate your compression ratio. No foolin'. Every equation and process demonstrated. Find all your variables. Know your exact compression ratio in every cylinder. This is how you do it. Just because your service manual says your car is 7.8:1 or 8.5:1 compression doesn't mean that it is. Whenever there are casting irregularities, variations in piston height, parts that have been machined, non-OE parts, or changes to your head gasket selection, your compression ratio WILL change. It's highly probable that you're only CLOSE to spec if you've never touched your engine at all since it was "born", and that it doesn't MATCH spec. Even if it did, how would you know? This. 5 variables. V1 Swept Volume V2 Deck Volume V3 Piston-to-deck clearance V4 Piston dish cc's V5 Head combustion chamber cc's The ratio math: V1+V2+V3+V4+V5 = volume of combustion chamber at BDC V2+V3+V4+V5 = volume of combustion chamber at TDC The ratio is... (V1+V2+V3+V4+V5) ÷ (V2+V3+V4+V5) : (V2+V3+V4+V5) ÷ (V2+V3+V4+V5) or BDC ÷ TDC : TDC ÷ TDC First you fill in the variables, then you calculate volumes, then you add the volumes, then you reduce the ratio (fraction). It's that easy. Here are your magic numbers: 0.7854 = Pi quartered to the ten thousandth 16.387 = number of cc's in a cubic inch. If you divide any number in cc's by 16.387 it gives you inches. If you multiply any number in cubic inches by 16.387 it gives you cc's. Quartering pi lets you use the calculation: BORE x BORE x STROKE x .7854 = volume of a cylinder instead of... π x (BORE ÷ 2) x (BORE ÷ 2) x STROKE = volume of a cylinder Either way is right. You get the same result if you calculate pi to the ten thousandth. While I apologize for all the math, no I don't. I'm really not sorry. You actually clicked here for it whether you realize it or not. This is ALL the math, the tests, and the whole process to calculate your cylinder volumes and compression individually even if you don't know any of your variables yet. All of my numbers are present for those who want to calculate out the last 3 cylinders out of curiosity just to see how it affects cylinder volumes and compression ratios from one cylinder to the next. Why would I do that for you? Why would I deprive you of that practice? Just assume that all 4 of my combustion chambers are 41.75 ml if you do this. Clicking like share and subscribe helps a channel grow. It also motivates me. Don't sweat the camera. It's enough to know that so many of you care about what I'm doing here. From the bottom of my atmospheric dump, I thank you all! This gift horse's teeth are all over the place, but he sometimes poops gold nuggets. PS: Use ATF for your piston dish volume tests, not alcohol. Of course it's better just to use the spec sheet included with your pistons... but not everyone gets that luxury. Water is just fine for head combustion chamber tests. Dry and re-oil all parts that water touches.





How to Rebuild a Turbo - Part 1 of 2
Rebuilding a td05h 16g turbo. This process can be applied to many journal bearing turbochargers. :) It definitely comes in handy to know how to do this when you are in this type of hobby. 4/25/12: Small explanation on the balancing of the rotating assembly since I get so many comments regarding it. This particular turbocharger, td05h, has its rotating assembly components balanced separately. This means each individual part (compressor wheel, turbine wheel/shaft) gets balanced separately. This allows for easy interchangeability of parts in case they need replacing. This is why I am able to install a td05 20g wheel on this turbo without having to balance the entire rotating assembly. THIS IS NOT THE CASE FOR ALL turboS OUT THERE. You need to research whether your specific turbo (if it's not td05h) was balanced as an assembly or "component balanced" like I explained above. I hope this information helps. Good luck in your projects. Stay Boostin' keywords: turbocharger dsm eclipse talon awd gsx tsi fwd gst mitsubishi evo evolution lancer 14b 20g td06 td06h td05 install installation upgrade race vs Boost supra wrx sti toyota subaru Dyno laser rs rst 13g hx35 hx40 holset 18g 25g sbr t25 stock replace rebuilding big large nissan 240sx t28





Cylinder Head Porting and Port Matching
Anthony @ DIYautotech takes you through the steps on how to port match ( gasket match) your cylinder heads. This is a fairly simple project that may take you about a day, but will give you a cylinder head with high flow rates. High Flow = More Power If you have any questions, please feel free to ask! Don't forget to subscribe & watch all my other automotive videos!





Volvo Diesel Engine head porting : grinder time !
gasket port matching the head for better flow music : Ronald Jenkeens "fifteen fifty"





Boost Leak Testing 201: Using the tool.
This is the second part of the Boost leak testing series. In this video, several examples of possible leaks you might find are exhibited, as well as suggested fixes. Hopefully this video helps turbo cars around the world to be healthier and more powerful.





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