Drag Racing 1/4 Mile times 0-60 Dyno Fast Cars Muscle Cars

6-bolt 4g63 shortblock rebuild parts

I'm saying it right up front. This video goes above and beyond shortblock rebuild parts for a reason. Read on... The first part is stern, the last part is happy. Nobody in their right, left, forward or reverse minds puts a 23-year-old 4g63 engine back together with 100% OEM parts. Nobody's shooting for that good ol' stock 190hp feeling with a DSM drivetrain. Nobody. Not unless they've got something to prove. I am putting a 7-bolt head on a 6-bolt block. So with that said, I show several over-the-top internal parts that are and are not related to the short block itself. I show cams and valve springs which only matter for head work. Not part of the short block. Nobody makes an engine gasket kit with all the parts mixed and matched to do this. So what people have to do is order both kits, or order all the individual parts separately like I am doing here. It's at this stage you are working with a machine shop to return your old worn-out block to the specs you've chosen to follow, and you need these cylinder head parts at this stage of the game to do it right. These parts making an appearance in this video show 3 things... 1) I am not aiming for a stock build 2) Now is the time to have your cam and valve springs if you're going to make any changes to the head. 3) these gaskets, seals, pins, bolts and bearings are things you will need no matter what it is you're building if it's a 6-bolt block. When I do the head series, I will be showing modifications and parts to rebuild and make a 7-bolt head fit a 6-bolt block. This video assumes you disassembled a running or freshly-broken engine and that YOU HAVE ALL THE BOLTS, NUTS, WASHERS, and HARD PARTS of the motor that it needs, bagged and tagged like was demonstrated in the "Crankwalked?" video. You've watched me clean and inspect valves, lifters, rockers, crankshafts, rods, etc. I don't need my turbo, hoses, vacuum lines or anything like that yet, and they likely won't be for a MHI turbo anyway. This video focuses on the gaskets, seals, bearings, consumable and disposable parts that you should replace for the shortblock only. My old trusty 6-bolt front case is coming up in a future video, getting refurbished and rebuilt, and ssembling a shortblock doesn't require having timing components yet. The head gasket will probably get its very own video just like the front case. As you can see, I have very big plans with this upcoming series. We've hit the 200's on engine stuff. It's a milestone. For you 7-bolt guys... bah! I know this is all 6-bolt part numbers. Some parts are interchangeable but I didn't make it clear which ones are in this video. Don't worry, you will need these part numbers eventually (I hope that was a joke). But if you wait long enough, perhaps I'll be re-assembling a 7-bolt again? Here comes the first bit of good news... The reason the "Crankwalked?" video had a question mark in the title is because I wanted to see others' comments about it. Gain a consensus. There are so many different opinions about shortblock failures on the 2g cars that I didn't want to take sides with such an entertaining video. But it's not crankwalked. What you see is rod bearing failure as a result of torsional stress on the crankshaft. It was caused by a catastrophic clutch failure. The thrust bearing was .014", and crankwalk cars that fail from crankwalk are usually around .075"-.150". My thrust bearing was beat to death as my old 6-puck fragged. All the fail was initiated by the drivetrain, and the drivetrain problem was a fail by yours truly that had repeated several times prior to me making videos about it and getting it right. It's my fault for not catching it, but when I discovered it, the drivetrain series was born. So my 7-bolt crank is trashed, but the mains are fine. New bearings and a crank would fix its thrust measurements and I may just rebuild it for the sake of a video someday. Now comes the really good news. My brother is working with me to build a website. There will be tech links and things that simply can't be delivered on YouTube. Not in a practical and effective way anyway. Things like schedules, projects and mod lists, parts lists, bolt lists, torque specifications, printable worksheets for blueprinting, the parts I used to make my fuel injector cleaner... stuff my viewers need or ask for. Soon you'll know where to find it. I need to learn how to maintain it, but I'm a good student. Still, these things take time, and I haven't yet wrapped my own brain around its potential. I'm putting it out there for you guys because you deserve it. I'm simply astonished at how the channel has grown, and I feel the need to give back.


 


More Videos...


Calculate Your Compression Ratio
This is everything you need to do to calculate your compression ratio. No foolin'. Every equation and process demonstrated. Find all your variables. Know your exact compression ratio in every cylinder. This is how you do it. Just because your service manual says your car is 7.8:1 or 8.5:1 compression doesn't mean that it is. Whenever there are casting irregularities, variations in piston height, parts that have been machined, non-OE parts, or changes to your head gasket selection, your compression ratio WILL change. It's highly probable that you're only CLOSE to spec if you've never touched your engine at all since it was "born", and that it doesn't MATCH spec. Even if it did, how would you know? This. 5 variables. V1 Swept Volume V2 Deck Volume V3 Piston-to-deck clearance V4 Piston dish cc's V5 Head combustion chamber cc's The ratio math: V1+V2+V3+V4+V5 = volume of combustion chamber at BDC V2+V3+V4+V5 = volume of combustion chamber at TDC The ratio is... (V1+V2+V3+V4+V5) ÷ (V2+V3+V4+V5) : (V2+V3+V4+V5) ÷ (V2+V3+V4+V5) or BDC ÷ TDC : TDC ÷ TDC First you fill in the variables, then you calculate volumes, then you add the volumes, then you reduce the ratio (fraction). It's that easy. Here are your magic numbers: 0.7854 = Pi quartered to the ten thousandth 16.387 = number of cc's in a cubic inch. If you divide any number in cc's by 16.387 it gives you inches. If you multiply any number in cubic inches by 16.387 it gives you cc's. Quartering pi lets you use the calculation: BORE x BORE x STROKE x .7854 = volume of a cylinder instead of... π x (BORE ÷ 2) x (BORE ÷ 2) x STROKE = volume of a cylinder Either way is right. You get the same result if you calculate pi to the ten thousandth. While I apologize for all the math, no I don't. I'm really not sorry. You actually clicked here for it whether you realize it or not. This is ALL the math, the tests, and the whole process to calculate your cylinder volumes and compression individually even if you don't know any of your variables yet. All of my numbers are present for those who want to calculate out the last 3 cylinders out of curiosity just to see how it affects cylinder volumes and compression ratios from one cylinder to the next. Why would I do that for you? Why would I deprive you of that practice? Just assume that all 4 of my combustion chambers are 41.75 ml if you do this. Clicking like share and subscribe helps a channel grow. It also motivates me. Don't sweat the camera. It's enough to know that so many of you care about what I'm doing here. From the bottom of my atmospheric dump, I thank you all! This gift horse's teeth are all over the place, but he sometimes poops gold nuggets. PS: Use ATF for your piston dish volume tests, not alcohol. Of course it's better just to use the spec sheet included with your pistons... but not everyone gets that luxury. Water is just fine for head combustion chamber tests. Dry and re-oil all parts that water touches.





Crankshaft Refurbishing
Many of you have seen this one before. I apologize if bringing it back offends anyone. Domestickilla gave me a crankshaft, and it's a nice one that I want to clean up and use again. You'll be seeing a lot of it and because of this, this video deserves to be here. I fixed what I broke, and this was my experience. In this video Ballos Precision Machine demonstrates magnetic dye penetrant testing, crankshaft polishing and inspecting the balance of a "butchered" 4g63 6-bolt crankshaft.





4g63 Oil Filter Housings
The link to my website is here BUT THE DATA AND PAGES ARE NOW BEING CREATED. I couldn't leave you without a video any longer. I really will have a link here very soon that goes straight to the information. To prove I'm not bullshittin' you... here's the website. http://www.jafromobile.com It's full of placeholders and copy I did not write. Though I did not write it, the author knows me very well! There will be highly-detailed measurements of all the pieces parts available shortly. I suppose if there was anything else I needed to say here it would be... these are the filter housings I got my hands on and tested. They happened to be from each of the models of the mainstream cars with a 4g63 in the United States with only one exception (EVO III). There may be variations from year to year, but to be as specific as I possibly can, read on... The 91-94 housing I demonstrated is specifically from an early 1992 6-bolt/4-bolt turbo AWD car. The one I call 95-99 is specifically from an October '94 built 1995 model Eclipse GSX. One of the '90 OFH's was brand new, and the other one on the Colt came from a 1990 Plymouth Laser FWD. The Galant housing I have no data on. I was told that's what it was. It may actually be from a non-turbo Eclipse? The 1990 factory service manual has an illustration of this oil cooler-less unit. I've never paid attention to this in the junkyard and I haven't owned a NA 4g63. Do the 1g non turbo DSMs even have oil coolers? You guys know better than me. The non-turbo oil filter housing is the least restrictive because it has the longest spring installed depth. The non-oil-cooler blocks are the no-oil-squirter blocks. Get how these are similar? You put an oil cooler on this thing and your pressure goes up. Look at the charts. Put an external air-oil cooler on a 1g? Your pressure goes up. Put the Evo III housing on a 2g? Pressure goes DOWN. High oil pressure can result not just from how you built your motor. Last thing to say... Yes, you could easily INCREASE your spring installed height by using a THICKER crush washer. That would lower your pre-load, opening pressure AND piston travel across the port prior to spring bind. Could you double-stack crush washers? Probably. Will it leak oil? I'm sure it will eventually. Either bore the cap deeper or machine a 1 piece part is my recommendation. Would I try it with stacked crush washers? Most definitely. Look at what you have to do to remove and port it.





9 Second Mitsubishi Mirage - 4g63 AWD Drag Race - Track Rental 6/20/12, Ryan P. MitsuRage
Ryan P's 4g63 AWD Mirage at New England Dragway 6/20/12. Multiple 9 and 10 second passes, trying some new ideas out, less Boost and some Nitrous, car has gone a best of 9.61 @ 143mph. FFWD built 2.3L 4g63 stroker, still on stock intake manifold, stock (evo) turbo throttle body. New England DSM





Cylinder Head 206 - Valve Clearance (& LSA)
This video is the companion and continuation video for Cylinder Head 205. In Cylinder Head 205 we covered the tools and technique for setting valve timing versus the factory-recommended specifications. It didn't work, thus; this video. How do I know it didn't work? Watch this video. The reason this is a companion video is because anyone changing their valve timing must also CHECK their valve clearance or risk bending valves. If I can install aftermarket cams, then I have made significant changes to my valve clearance. If I move cam gears on an engine that was previously running, then I have made significant changes to my valve clearance. If I have milled my head or block, I have made significant changes to my valve clearance. If I have installed larger valves, I have made significant changes to my valve clearance. Mitsubishi doesn't build a whole lot of wiggle room into their valvetrains. They keep the valves pretty tight to maximize performance and a 4g63 IS an interference engine. Note that if you follow the recommendations in this video and damage your valvetrain that I am not responsible. Here I demonstrate all of the techniques to ensure that damage never occurs because these tests are performed PRIOR to the engine ever starting, and prove that clearance is adequate for THE PARTS I SHOW HERE ON CAMERA. There can be components installed in other rotating assemblies that require additional clearance to be built into your valve clearance such as aluminum rods, or other alloys employed in the casting and forging of rotating assembly parts and valves. I strongly urge you to check with those manufacturers for their recommendations regarding thermal expansion, stretch, bounce rocker gap or float prior to making any adjustments, and use this video only as a documentation of my experience. In other words, it's my opinion. What works in your engine will likely be very different from mine, but the tests and the math shown here will work the same with your build. To find your intake valve clearance... Add your intake valve opening degrees (btdc) to your intake valve closing degrees (abdc) to 180°. IO + IC + 180 = DURATION DURATION ÷ 2 = LOBE CENTERLINE LOBE CENTERLINE - IO = INSTALLED INTAKE CENTERLINE To find your Exhaust valve clearance... Add your Exhaust valve opening degrees (bbdc) to your intake valve closing degrees (atdc) to 180°. EO + EC + 180 = DURATION DURATION ÷ 2 = LOBE CENTERLINE LOBE CENTERLINE - EC = INSTALLED Exhaust CENTERLINE To get your Lobe Separation Angle, ADD your INSTALLED INTAKE CENTERLINE to your INSTALLED Exhaust CENTERLINE and divide that result by 2. Intake Centerline + Exhaust Centerline ÷ 2 = LSA Tight Lobe Separation Angles * MOVE TORQUE LOWER IN THE POWER BAND * INCREASE MAXIMUM TORQUE OUTPUT * INCREASE CYLINDER PRESSURE * INCREASE CRANKING COMPRESSION * INCREASE EFFECTIVE COMPRESSION * INCREASE COMBUSTION CHAMBER SCAVENGING EFFECT * SHORTEN YOUR POWER BAND * REDUCE IDLE VACUUM! * REDUCE IDLE STABILITY * INCREASE LIKELIHOOD OF KNOCK! * INCREASE OVERLAP * DECREASE PISTON TO VALVE CLEARANCE! Wide Lobe Separation Angles * MOVE TORQUE HIGHER IN THE POWER BAND * DECREASE MAXIMUM TORQUE OUTPUT * LENGTHEN YOUR POWER BAND * DECREASE CYLINDER PRESSURE * DECREASE LIKELIHOOD OF KNOCK * DECREASE CRANKING COMPRESSION * DECREASE EFFECTIVE COMPRESSION * INCREASE IDLE VACUUM * IMPROVE IDLE STABILITY * DECREASE OVERLAP * DECREASE COMBUSTION CHAMBER SCAVENGING EFFECT * INCREASE PISTON TO VALVE CLEARANCE There's more that I want to say about Lobe Separation Angle (LSA). If you're tuning a DOHC engine with cam gears, you're very lucky to go through all this trouble. The pushrod and SOHC crowd can't change their lobe separation angles without replacing their camshaft, and on many engines that means removing the cylinder heads. On a 4g63 with adjustable gears, you loosen the lock bolts, turn, lock it back down and you've adjusted your LSA. This is a luxury which if you've never had to build a SOHC or a pushrod engine and install camshafts that you take for granted. DOHC tuning permits the ability to alter the opening and closing events of the valves independently of one another and perfect the valve timing during tuning without having to completely remove and replace the valvetrain. What this also means is that the pushrod crowd needs to know and understand a lot more about their camshaft profiles prior to making their purchase as we [the DOHC crowd] do. They have to be on their A-game when they drop the coin on a new cam or else things get expensive really quick. Lobe separation angle says more about how camshafts behave than duration and lift, but all 3 should be carefully scrutinized when you're making that determination. Yes, I did actually animate my engine's valve timing exactly the way HKS said to set it up. Yes those are all actual photos of my parts. Yes that was the biggest Photoshop file I've ever created.





2g 7-bolt 4g63 Engine Removal & Disassembly
Tearing down the GSX to see what broke, and what I need to buy. Sitting for a year and letting the battery drain took a toll on the polished finish... and it looks like a piece of 4th gear wanted to take a look at the outside world. Holy transmission case, and it's off to TRE to see what's salvageable. Looks like the clutch could stand to be replaced, too. Timing belt has taken some abuse from the higher rev limit and I was expecting that. EGT probe is fried and I don't even care. Since I'm running DSMlink and can log Boost, I'm removing all my gauges anyway. Front case seal (freeze plug) is leaking a tad, and the crank seal shows signs of excessive crankcase pressure. I'm going to make some changes... I've got a lot of other tricks up my sleeve, so stay tuned.





Cylinder Head 205 - Degree DOHC Camshafts
This video is all about establishing your valve timing baseline, and adjusting your camshafts to the manufacturer's spec. It's only ONE of several steps that should be performed when you're assembling your engine on an engine stand. Establishing these conditions with accuracy while your engine installed in the car is a near-impossibility, and the reason why... is demonstrated in this video. There are several challenges to overcome when performing these procedures on a 4gxx series Mitsubishi engine, and they're all defeated here. The cylinder head used in this video is a J1 spec '92 Hyundai Elantra small-combustion chamber head which has had several valve jobs and has been resurfaced multiple times by budget engine remanufacturers who didn't care about quality control, as well as performance shops who do. It has had no less than .040" removed from the head gasket surface, the valves are recessed because of all the valve jobs performed, and at some point when it was cut, it wasn't level. Removing material from the deck surface will change the installed camshaft centerline, and that will change your engine's valve timing events even if all other parts remain the same. I would claim this is a multi-part video except that I've got the videos broken up by topic already, and this one is all about setting your cams to the manufacturer's specification. It is not the end of testing that will be performed with these tools. The basics concerning the process and tool fabrication are covered here. Further discussion on this topic concerning the effects of advancing or retarding camshafts from spec, and for checking your valve clearance will be in the videos that follow. I had to end this video after the manufacturer's spec was achieved to make it easier to digest, and because it would have created a video greater than one hour in length despite the break-neck speeds that things happen here on Jafromobile. Where your cams are set determine how the swept volume of the combustion chamber gets used. The information on the manufacturer's spec sheet is their recommendation for baseline settings that will help you get the most out of those camshafts. Whether or not your engine can operate with those specifications without additional hardware or without causing a catastrophic failure will be expanded upon in Cylinder Head 206. The next video should be used as a companion to this video because establishing the manufacturer's baseline is not the end of the assembly or testing process. It's only half the battle. Should you be lucky enough to find your combination of parts allow your camshafts to fit and requires no additional adjustment after assembly, the steps in this video and in Cylinder Head 206 should still be performed if you are doing the assembly yourself. Failure to inspect these variables may lead to a tuning nightmare once the engine is back in the car, hard starts, or worse... bent valves and damaged wrist pins. Making these tools and performing these steps will give you the peace of mind to know with certainty that your engine is operating safely at its peak performance.





lancer evo build 4g63





4g63 Oil System
This is another installment about 6 & 7 bolt 4g63 oil systems. It's where the oil flows and when. If you see signs of oil starvation on engine parts, it's important to note what is up-stream and down-stream from it in the oil supply. Knowing where the oil flows helps you determine what went wrong. Chasing damage up-stream on the oil system can reveal defects, stuck oil squirters, failed bearings or blockages in the oil galleries. It can also reveal perfectly good parts which means you've gone too far looking for the problem. This is how you determine what really failed, and why it's important to consider how tight or wide to set your oil clearances, and how popular modifications can affect your oil system. About the charts... keep your pants on. I will make them available. Until then, they're right here in this video. ;)





Hyundai 4g63 Assembly Part 3
I have bad news. The big camera's playback heads bit the dust from extensive prolonged use. I wore out the tape drive. No manner of cleaning tapes can fix what it's been through. I've talked many times about how much footage goes into one of my 15 to 30 minute videos, and for every hour of video footage I've shot, the camera does double-duty because after shooting, it has to be played back in real time during capture. I've done more than 130 videos this way, probably over 2000 hours of use in the harshest of environments, and it just couldn't handle it any longer. I shot several more tapes beyond what's in this video that I can't even import because the play heads failed. I don't know if any of that video even stuck to the tapes? The lost footage from the last video was an early and un-recognized sign of what was soon to come. I know I joked about it, but in reality it's really not very funny at all. I can't afford a backup for a piece of equipment like this, so it's something I don't have. As bad as this news might feel to you, I feel it 21,000 times over and I mean that. This couldn't come at a worse time and expense for me, and at a point where my production was really starting to wrap up on this project to move on to bigger and better things. It's the only camera I have that can do what I do here on this channel, so I'm forced to stop production for now. Even though my camera is huge, 7 year old HDV technology, these things still sell for several thousand dollars used because they record un-compressed video unlike every other flash storage based solution available at twice the price. 3CCD 1080/60i HD cameras that shoot to tape have advantages that you can't affordably achieve with solid-state media. I have to use un-compressed footage to do what I do here or else there's nothing left of the video quality after 7 exports and a final mpeg compression. The Sony Action Cam can't do it, we learned that in a previous test video. Even if it could, it can't do close-ups and everything's fisheyed. Buying a low-end 4K camera is impractical because I can't efficiently or effectively edit that video without a $9,000 computer. Jafromobile is just not that big of a channel, and I do this completely un-sponsored and at my own expense with the help of a handful of friends who volunteer their talent, time and information. It's the epitome of low-budget and what it earns still doesn't come close covering the channel's equipment and expenses as they occur. People have urged that I do a kickstarter, but I can't bring myself to ask for that from the community. I don't sell a product or offer services so there is no profit margin. I can't accept money for something that happens only at the speed of my available resources. To me, this channel is my proverbial gift horse to all of you. http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/don't_look_a_gift_horse_in_the_mouth I know what you're thinking and I realize this is a grim conclusion to this video. It sounds like I'm down for the count, but don't rush to the down vote button just yet. As of the upload date of this video, I'm paying out of pocket to fix a ridiculously expensive 3CCD 1080HD broadcast quality video camera so that these projects can resume, and so that I can bring the final assembly steps to you in the same quality you've grown used to seeing here on Jafromobile. If I wear out a camera every 3 years, then so be it. This is love, and no expense is too great. The big camera is being fixed by its manufacturer, and I'm expecting the repair to cost as much as replacing it. I sincerely hope that's not the case. Hopefully my production only has to take a short break. Once production resumes and I can import these tapes, I've got some really awesome stuff coming up and I hope every last one of you is here to see it. I may have a few other backlogged nuggets I can upload, and as always I'm happy to discuss this in the comments and provide updates on the repair as I get them. Update: Awaiting quote due by 5/16 according to the repair agreement. 5/9/2014 9:17:00 AM DELIVERED NEWPORT NEWS, VA US 5/9/2014 5:36:00 AM DESTINATION SCAN NEWPORT NEWS, VA US 5/9/2014 12:04:00 AM ARRIVAL SCAN NEWPORT NEWS, VA US 5/12/2014 - Repair paid in full $440. Far less than I was expecting. I'm glad they still make parts for 7 year old professional equipment. Thank You Canon, USA! Repair should be complete within 7 business days from receipt of payment. The quote only took them 24 hours and they quoted a week just for the estimate, so at this rate I should be back up and running once again very soon. Thank ALL of you for your kind words, HUGE generosity, and all of the moral support. I swear I have the best subscribers on YouTube!





Cylinder Head 109 - Oil Port Mod
This is a continuation of the deck tech video, but instead of focusing on the deck, this focuses on the oil system and modifications that are necessary if you've had the head resurfaced a couple of times. There are other benefits that can be gained for cars that have no block oil squirters and deleted balance shafts. There are varying degrees of this mod that can be performed for a variety of different configurations, so do your research regarding what you'd need in order to determine how deep you should cut it. Most of the data will be based off of your baseline oil pressure both in the head and in the block. If the block is high, or the head is low in relation to where it should be, then you can benefit from this modification. The most obvious sign of inadequate oil flow would be noisy lifters. Revisit the Deck Tech 103 video for further clarification on casting variances, ARP head studs, machining tolerances, and what all the other holes do.





三菱 ランサーエボリューション4G63エンジン モンスタースポーツ コンプリートエンジン【MX350】作業解説 [MONSTER SPORT MITSUBISHI EVO TUNED Eg]
http://item.rakuten.co.jp/tajimastore/c/0000000162/ http://www.monster-sport.com/product/parts/complete_eng/ http://www.monster-sport.com/e/car/evo10.html 三菱のスポーツエンジン4G63を、多くのモータースポー 用エンジンに携わり、エンジンの研究・実験により得 ノウハウと、高度に標準化した品質管理と工程管理の でコンプリートエンジン化しました。





4. Tearing down a '90 Turbo 4g63 engine
Decided to rebuild the engine to leave nothing in question.





Colt Driveshaft Install Part 2/3
It cost me $55 to have my driveshaft shortened. They even painted it at that price. After rebuilding the Colt's driveshaft I clear up the process and complete its installation. I discuss fabricating the front carrier bearing mount and positioning it, illustrate pinion angles, and hit 2 points left out of the driveshaft series. Those two points being the grease volume in the Lobro boot and using Loctite during assembly. No fancy audio track this time. Rumor has it some people had trouble concentrating, and we're going to cover a lot of ground fast. It's also extremely difficult to generate 18 minute songs just to have them permanently get hung in YouTube's copyright arbitration. So this time it's just a detailed explanation of how this worked out for me. No distractions. The driveshaft was shortened as the final edits were being placed on the last video. I jumped right back into the garage to bring you the next 12 hours of footage in just under 18 minutes. There's no perfect recipe for an AWD Colt. Everyone bakes theirs a little different. I convicted myself to share its entire transformation and potentially my fiery death in it on YouTube. Hopefully not the latter. I just want to clear something up because I don't want a flame war about this again. I'm not here as a professional mechanic handing out diplomas. If someone learned anything from my experience, that's the reward in hanging out here. Anyone is welcome to disagree with my methods at any time, but I'm not going to argue or volley about this subject with anyone in 500 character comments unless it's constructive. If anyone wishes to complain about me breaking bolts loose by hitting my wrenches with a mini-sledge, you're welcome to simply explain a better method that worked for you on these parts. You can't fit sockets over the bolt heads or nuts so you can access them with impact wrenches or breaker bars. There's a carrier bearing tight up against the nut side, and the bolt heads rest against the lobro joint's metal boot cup which is not dimpled to allow access for a socket. If you strip out the 7mm allen-head portion of the bolt, you'll never be able to torque the bolts back down. If you use a torch there's a high probability of starting a grease fire. A grease fire isn't very easy to stop. Most people take apart a Lobro joint because the boot is ripped and grease is leaking out. You have fuel, you have air, don't add fire. No it's not good for your tools to hit them with a hammer, yes it's dangerous because wrenches can become airborne, but if you do this over a workbench and take precautions, it's extremely effective and you won't get hurt. I have little concern with a 12mm crescent wrench if it's all that's standing between me and having a 500hp AWD Colt. If you manage to break a wrench, they're still much cheaper to replace than a fire extinguisher. I received dozens of complaints about shop ethics, but this is an acceptable means of breaking bolts loose when all else fails. It's the nature of red thread locker. I figured it was better to explain this here in the comments so others will firstly understand why it's not the ideal method, but most of all why it's the least-dangerous method. You will injure yourself far worse if the jaws of your wrench spread and you smash your knuckles against something when it slips off. I respect the reasoning behind others' concern on this topic and I don't want anyone getting hurt either... so consider that your 12mm wrench may be expendable on this job, and proceed at your own risk. But the other thing I left out of the driveshaft series... make sure you have a fresh tube of red loctite handy. I thought I had mine before I started the job and it was hard as nails. You need red loctite on your Lobro bolts. I do indeed fail at important things from time to time. I'll be sure to do it on-video and make a public example of myself when I do so we can all learn from it.





4G63 Datsun 1200 - Jett Racing
Mitsubishi 4G63 turbo powered Datsun 1200 Ute by Jett Racing. Racing in the Pro Compact class at the 2012 Sport Compact Brisbane Jamboree. http://www.facebook.com/fullBoostcomau http://www.youtube.com/user/fullBoostcomau http://www.fullBoost.com.au




Which car is faster? Which Car is Faster?





Similar 1/4 mile timeslips to browse:

2005 Mazda 6 Drag Car: 7.930 @ 187.000
Ed Bergenholtz, Engine: 2.3L Mazda i4 by Golden Eagle Mfg., Supercharger: None Turbos: Garret GT45 Tires: M & H


2006 Mazda 6 Mazdaspeed: 11.381 @ 123.940
Anthony Pannone, Turbos: ATP GTX35R Tires: Conti DWS 215/45/18


2006 Mazda 6 Mazdaspeed 6: 11.612 @ 119.220
Anthony Pannone, Engine: 2.3l MZR DISI, Turbos: GT3076R Tires: hankook evo V12


2006 Mazda 6 Mazdaspeed 6: 12.011 @ 113.930
Andrew , Engine: 2.3 MZR, Turbos: GT3071R Tires: Federal SS


2006 Mazda 6 Mazdaspeed 6: 12.240 @ 114.270
Anthony Pannone, Engine: 2.3L MZR turbo, Turbos: GT3076 Tires: hankook evo V12


2007 Mazda 6 Mazdaspeed: 12.263 @ 111.750
Rich Brockman, Engine: Stock, Supercharger: n/a Turbos: Stock Tires: 225 55 17 Conti DWS Extreme


2007 Mazda 6 mazdaspeed6: 12.301 @ 113.200
Jeff Hawkes, Engine: MZR 2.3T, Turbos: stock k04


2006 Mazda 6 sport: 12.370 @ 111.000
charles, Engine: 2.3, Turbos: 7 blade gt3076 ported .55 a/r hotside Tires: nitto neo gens 245/35/19


2007 Mazda 6 MPS: 12.501 @ 112.000
MazdaGaragePat, Engine: MZR 2261 cc, Turbos: Garrett GT3076 T3 divided 1.06 Tires: 235/40 R18 Federal 595 RS-R


2006 Mazda 6 mazdaspeed6: 12.550 @ 109.000
charles, Engine: 2.3l, Turbos: gt3076 Tires: Bf goodridge kdw 235/35/18


2007 Mazda 6 Speed6: 12.620 @ 110.090
p057, Engine: stock, Turbos: gt3071 Tires: hankook ventus v12s 225/40/18


2006 Mazda 6 speed6: 12.624 @ 107.800
charles, Engine: 2.3 turbo, Turbos: gt3076 Tires: NITTO NEO GENS


2006 Mazda 6 Mazdaspeed 6: 12.655 @ 111.360
Anthony Pannone, Engine: stock, Turbos: GT3076R


2006 Mazda 6 Mazdaspeed6: 12.655 @ 111.750
Andrew Helm, Engine: stock block, Turbos: GT3071r Tires: Nitto NT555


2006 Mazda 6 mazdaspeed6: 12.850 @ 105.850
Michael, Engine: 2.3 disi turbo, Turbos: stock Tires: stock


2007 Mazda 6 Mazdaspeed6 GT: 12.896 @ 104.740
2nr, Turbos: stock


2006 Mazda 6 Mazdaspeed 6: 12.907 @ 106.750
superskaterxes, Engine: 2.3l MZR DISI, Turbos: k04


2006 Mazda 6 Mazdaspeed: 12.918 @ 103.460
Shawn C, Engine: 2.3 DISI, Turbos: Stock


2006 Mazda 6 Speed 6: 12.991 @ 107.780
jcgemt2003, Engine: 2.3, Turbos: stock


2006 Mazda 6 Speed 6: 13.017 @ 104.610
cm-jp1, Turbos: Stock k04


 


©2014 DragTimes - Disclaimer