6-bolt 4g63 shortblock rebuild parts

I'm saying it right up front. This video goes above and beyond shortblock rebuild parts for a reason. Read on... The first part is stern, the last part is happy. Nobody in their right, left, forward or reverse minds puts a 23-year-old 4g63 engine back together with 100% OEM parts. Nobody's shooting for that good ol' stock 190hp feeling with a DSM drivetrain. Nobody. Not unless they've got something to prove. I am putting a 7-bolt head on a 6-bolt block. So with that said, I show several over-the-top internal parts that are and are not related to the short block itself. I show cams and valve springs which only matter for head work. Not part of the short block. Nobody makes an engine gasket kit with all the parts mixed and matched to do this. So what people have to do is order both kits, or order all the individual parts separately like I am doing here. It's at this stage you are working with a machine shop to return your old worn-out block to the specs you've chosen to follow, and you need these cylinder head parts at this stage of the game to do it right. These parts making an appearance in this video show 3 things... 1) I am not aiming for a stock build 2) Now is the time to have your cam and valve springs if you're going to make any changes to the head. 3) these gaskets, seals, pins, bolts and bearings are things you will need no matter what it is you're building if it's a 6-bolt block. When I do the head series, I will be showing modifications and parts to rebuild and make a 7-bolt head fit a 6-bolt block. This video assumes you disassembled a running or freshly-broken engine and that YOU HAVE ALL THE BOLTS, NUTS, WASHERS, and HARD PARTS of the motor that it needs, bagged and tagged like was demonstrated in the "Crankwalked?" video. You've watched me clean and inspect valves, lifters, rockers, crankshafts, rods, etc. I don't need my turbo, hoses, vacuum lines or anything like that yet, and they likely won't be for a MHI turbo anyway. This video focuses on the gaskets, seals, bearings, consumable and disposable parts that you should replace for the shortblock only. My old trusty 6-bolt front case is coming up in a future video, getting refurbished and rebuilt, and ssembling a shortblock doesn't require having timing components yet. The head gasket will probably get its very own video just like the front case. As you can see, I have very big plans with this upcoming series. We've hit the 200's on engine stuff. It's a milestone. For you 7-bolt guys... bah! I know this is all 6-bolt part numbers. Some parts are interchangeable but I didn't make it clear which ones are in this video. Don't worry, you will need these part numbers eventually (I hope that was a joke). But if you wait long enough, perhaps I'll be re-assembling a 7-bolt again? Here comes the first bit of good news... The reason the "Crankwalked?" video had a question mark in the title is because I wanted to see others' comments about it. Gain a consensus. There are so many different opinions about shortblock failures on the 2g cars that I didn't want to take sides with such an entertaining video. But it's not crankwalked. What you see is rod bearing failure as a result of torsional stress on the crankshaft. It was caused by a catastrophic clutch failure. The thrust bearing was .014", and crankwalk cars that fail from crankwalk are usually around .075"-.150". My thrust bearing was beat to death as my old 6-puck fragged. All the fail was initiated by the drivetrain, and the drivetrain problem was a fail by yours truly that had repeated several times prior to me making videos about it and getting it right. It's my fault for not catching it, but when I discovered it, the drivetrain series was born. So my 7-bolt crank is trashed, but the mains are fine. New bearings and a crank would fix its thrust measurements and I may just rebuild it for the sake of a video someday. Now comes the really good news. My brother is working with me to build a website. There will be tech links and things that simply can't be delivered on YouTube. Not in a practical and effective way anyway. Things like schedules, projects and mod lists, parts lists, bolt lists, torque specifications, printable worksheets for blueprinting, the parts I used to make my fuel injector cleaner... stuff my viewers need or ask for. Soon you'll know where to find it. I need to learn how to maintain it, but I'm a good student. Still, these things take time, and I haven't yet wrapped my own brain around its potential. I'm putting it out there for you guys because you deserve it. I'm simply astonished at how the channel has grown, and I feel the need to give back.

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6&7-Bolt 4g63 Front Case & Oil Pump Rebuild
Here we disassemble, clean, inspect and rebuild both popular 4g63 front cases. This is not difficult, you just need to know what to look for. Something else that happens in this video is the analysis of one of the factors that caused my 7-bolt engine to fail. It wasn't the only cause, and we'll talk about that later, but left to its own devices and without the other contributing factors, it would have been the only cause.





Jafro's GSX Build Parts - 1gina2g
Some advice and expectations about the parts acquisition process. Cars only get built in a week on TV. And still then you have to take their word for it. The ones that actually do it have a 20 man full-time crew, and therefore; they have no excuse for not having it done yet. We don't have that. Stuff takes time. I'm not building a car to sell it. There's a whole lot of parts in this video. Whole lot of parts. Rather than spend a ton of space babbling incessantly, this is what you came here for. Part numbers. Meat. This isn't an all-inclusive list of parts for a rebuild. It's what YouTube let me fit. I hope you find what you needed. If not, hang tight. Help is on the way. Shoutout to Sirnixalot in the Cayman Islands for this thread about valvetrain part weights: http://www.dsmtuners.com/forums/cylinder-head-short-block/393646-evo3-evo8- valvetrain-weight-comparison-inside.html 6-bolt fasteners: MF140202 - Bolt, Engine RR Plate Flange M6 x 10 (2qty) MD012109 - Bolt, Engine RR Plate Washer Assembled 6 x 16 (2qty) MF140202 - Bolt, Timing Belt Cover Flange M6 x 10 (4qty) MD167134 - Bolt, Engine Oil Pan (2qty) Flange M6 x 8 MD097012 - Bolt, Engine Oil Pan (17qty) Flange M6x10 MD131417 - Bolt, Timing Belt Cover Flange M6x16 MD040557 - Bolt, Flywheel (6qty) M12x22.5 MS401451 - Stud, M10 x 28 Cylinder Block MD065945 - Plug, Cylinder Block Screw (balance shaft) MS240211 - Bolt, Crankshaft Pulley Washer Assembled M8x25 (4qty) MD129350 - Bolt, Timing Belt Tensioner (2qty) M8x51 MD129354 - Bolt, Timing Belt Train M10x33 Happy Face Bolt MF140062 - Bolt, Engine Front Case M10x30 MF140225 - Bolt, Engine Front Case M8x20 (4qty) MF140227 - Bolt, Engine Front Case M8x25 MF140233 - Bolt, Engine Front Case M8x40 MF241266 - Bolt, Oil Filter Washer Assembled M8x65 MF241261 - Bolt, Oil Filter Washer Assembled M8x40 (2qty) MF241268 - Bolt, Oil Filter Washer Assembled M8x75 MF241264 - Bolt, Washer Assembled M8x55 MF140021 - Bolt, Cooling Water Line Flange M8x12 MF241256 - Bolt, M/T Clutch Slave Cylinder Washer Assembled M8x28 MD718549 - Bolt, Transfer Case Washer Assembled M12x130 (3qty) MF241319 - Bolt, Transfer Case Washer Assembled M12x70 (4qty) MD706012 - Bolt, T/M Connecting Flange M8x60 MD108474 - Bolt, Starter Flange M10x65 (2qty) MF140266 - Bolt, T/M Connecting Flange M10x40 (2qty) MD740892 - Bolt, T/M Connecting Flange M10x43.5 MF140471 - Bolt, T/M Connecting Flange M10x65 MD706012 - Bolt, T/M Connecting Flange M8x60 MF140021 - Bolt, T/M Connecting Flange M8x12 6-bolt Rear Main Seal Housing: MF140205 - Bolt, Cylinder Block Flange M6 x 16 (5qty) Rear Oil Seal Case MD040330 - Case, Crankshaft Rear Oil Seal MD040332 - Oil Separator Crakshaft rear oil seal MF472403 - Pin Cylinder Block Dowel 6x14mm (2qty) MD183243 - Gasket, Rear Oil Seal Case 7-bolt Rear Main Seal Case MD172170* * oil separator ring only required on 6-bolt cars, same oil seal, different gasket. Throttle Body Gasket: 8903.1-9006.1 MD125822 1g 9006.2-9207.3 MD146399 1g (AC60-653) 9208.1-9405.1 MD194578 1g 9401.1-9907.2 MD180360 all 2g cars (MD1) Intake Elbow Gasket: 8903.1-9207.3 MD340327 1g 9208.1-9405.1 MD194827 1g 9401.1-9907.2 MD302262 all 2g cars MD307343 - OE Valve Stem Seals (16qty) MD087060 - OE Fuel Injector Insulator (4qty) MD614813 - OE Fuel Injector O-Ring (4qty) MD181032 - Gasket, Exhaust Manifold 1g/2g (standard) MD188995 - Gasket, 1g Intake Manifold MD192031 - Gasket, 2g Intake Manifold MD183808 - Gasket, Standard Composite Head Gasket 89-99 MD069879 - 1g Sensor Coolant Gauge Unit MD177572 - 2g Sensor Coolant Gauge Unit MD310606 - 1g/2g alternator belt 985mm MD186124 - 1g/2g alternator belt 980mm MD186784 - 1g/2g Valve Cover Gasket MD186785 - 1g/2g Spark Plug Well Gaskets (4qty) MN119896 - 1g tensioner arm MD170402 - 2g tensioner arm MD997608 - 1g thermostat kit MD315301 - 2g Thermostat Kit MD141510 - 1g Knock Sensor MD300670 - 2g Knock Sensor MD133273 - 1g/2g Oil Pressure Gauge Sensor MD091056 - 1g/2g Coolant Temperature Switch MD095656 - 6 bolt clutch cover plate MD191171 - 7 bolt clutch cover plate MD178430 - 1g Power Steering Belt MD310617 - 2g Power Steering Belt MD311638 - Oil filter cap gasket MD343564 - Oil Seal, Crankshaft Rear MD030764 - O-ring, Cooling Water Pipe 33.4mm MD375091 - EVO 8 Rocker Arm





Calculate Your Compression Ratio
This is everything you need to do to calculate your compression ratio. No foolin'. Every equation and process demonstrated. Find all your variables. Know your exact compression ratio in every cylinder. This is how you do it. Just because your service manual says your car is 7.8:1 or 8.5:1 compression doesn't mean that it is. Whenever there are casting irregularities, variations in piston height, parts that have been machined, non-OE parts, or changes to your head gasket selection, your compression ratio WILL change. It's highly probable that you're only CLOSE to spec if you've never touched your engine at all since it was "born", and that it doesn't MATCH spec. Even if it did, how would you know? This. 5 variables. V1 Swept Volume V2 Deck Volume V3 Piston-to-deck clearance V4 Piston dish cc's V5 Head combustion chamber cc's The ratio math: V1+V2+V3+V4+V5 = volume of combustion chamber at BDC V2+V3+V4+V5 = volume of combustion chamber at TDC The ratio is... (V1+V2+V3+V4+V5) ÷ (V2+V3+V4+V5) : (V2+V3+V4+V5) ÷ (V2+V3+V4+V5) or BDC ÷ TDC : TDC ÷ TDC First you fill in the variables, then you calculate volumes, then you add the volumes, then you reduce the ratio (fraction). It's that easy. Here are your magic numbers: 0.7854 = Pi quartered to the ten thousandth 16.387 = number of cc's in a cubic inch. If you divide any number in cc's by 16.387 it gives you inches. If you multiply any number in cubic inches by 16.387 it gives you cc's. Quartering pi lets you use the calculation: BORE x BORE x STROKE x .7854 = volume of a cylinder instead of... π x (BORE ÷ 2) x (BORE ÷ 2) x STROKE = volume of a cylinder Either way is right. You get the same result if you calculate pi to the ten thousandth. While I apologize for all the math, no I don't. I'm really not sorry. You actually clicked here for it whether you realize it or not. This is ALL the math, the tests, and the whole process to calculate your cylinder volumes and compression individually even if you don't know any of your variables yet. All of my numbers are present for those who want to calculate out the last 3 cylinders out of curiosity just to see how it affects cylinder volumes and compression ratios from one cylinder to the next. Why would I do that for you? Why would I deprive you of that practice? Just assume that all 4 of my combustion chambers are 41.75 ml if you do this. Clicking like share and subscribe helps a channel grow. It also motivates me. Don't sweat the camera. It's enough to know that so many of you care about what I'm doing here. From the bottom of my atmospheric dump, I thank you all! This gift horse's teeth are all over the place, but he sometimes poops gold nuggets. PS: Use ATF for your piston dish volume tests, not alcohol. Of course it's better just to use the spec sheet included with your pistons... but not everyone gets that luxury. Water is just fine for head combustion chamber tests. Dry and re-oil all parts that water touches.




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