6-bolt 4g63 shortblock rebuild parts

I'm saying it right up front. This video goes above and beyond shortblock rebuild parts for a reason. Read on... The first part is stern, the last part is happy. Nobody in their right, left, forward or reverse minds puts a 23-year-old 4g63 engine back together with 100% OEM parts. Nobody's shooting for that good ol' stock 190hp feeling with a DSM drivetrain. Nobody. Not unless they've got something to prove. I am putting a 7-bolt head on a 6-bolt block. So with that said, I show several over-the-top internal parts that are and are not related to the short block itself. I show cams and valve springs which only matter for head work. Not part of the short block. Nobody makes an engine gasket kit with all the parts mixed and matched to do this. So what people have to do is order both kits, or order all the individual parts separately like I am doing here. It's at this stage you are working with a machine shop to return your old worn-out block to the specs you've chosen to follow, and you need these cylinder head parts at this stage of the game to do it right. These parts making an appearance in this video show 3 things... 1) I am not aiming for a stock build 2) Now is the time to have your cam and valve springs if you're going to make any changes to the head. 3) these gaskets, seals, pins, bolts and bearings are things you will need no matter what it is you're building if it's a 6-bolt block. When I do the head series, I will be showing modifications and parts to rebuild and make a 7-bolt head fit a 6-bolt block. This video assumes you disassembled a running or freshly-broken engine and that YOU HAVE ALL THE BOLTS, NUTS, WASHERS, and HARD PARTS of the motor that it needs, bagged and tagged like was demonstrated in the "Crankwalked?" video. You've watched me clean and inspect valves, lifters, rockers, crankshafts, rods, etc. I don't need my turbo, hoses, vacuum lines or anything like that yet, and they likely won't be for a MHI turbo anyway. This video focuses on the gaskets, seals, bearings, consumable and disposable parts that you should replace for the shortblock only. My old trusty 6-bolt front case is coming up in a future video, getting refurbished and rebuilt, and ssembling a shortblock doesn't require having timing components yet. The head gasket will probably get its very own video just like the front case. As you can see, I have very big plans with this upcoming series. We've hit the 200's on engine stuff. It's a milestone. For you 7-bolt guys... bah! I know this is all 6-bolt part numbers. Some parts are interchangeable but I didn't make it clear which ones are in this video. Don't worry, you will need these part numbers eventually (I hope that was a joke). But if you wait long enough, perhaps I'll be re-assembling a 7-bolt again? Here comes the first bit of good news... The reason the "Crankwalked?" video had a question mark in the title is because I wanted to see others' comments about it. Gain a consensus. There are so many different opinions about shortblock failures on the 2g cars that I didn't want to take sides with such an entertaining video. But it's not crankwalked. What you see is rod bearing failure as a result of torsional stress on the crankshaft. It was caused by a catastrophic clutch failure. The thrust bearing was .014", and crankwalk cars that fail from crankwalk are usually around .075"-.150". My thrust bearing was beat to death as my old 6-puck fragged. All the fail was initiated by the drivetrain, and the drivetrain problem was a fail by yours truly that had repeated several times prior to me making videos about it and getting it right. It's my fault for not catching it, but when I discovered it, the drivetrain series was born. So my 7-bolt crank is trashed, but the mains are fine. New bearings and a crank would fix its thrust measurements and I may just rebuild it for the sake of a video someday. Now comes the really good news. My brother is working with me to build a website. There will be tech links and things that simply can't be delivered on YouTube. Not in a practical and effective way anyway. Things like schedules, projects and mod lists, parts lists, bolt lists, torque specifications, printable worksheets for blueprinting, the parts I used to make my fuel injector cleaner... stuff my viewers need or ask for. Soon you'll know where to find it. I need to learn how to maintain it, but I'm a good student. Still, these things take time, and I haven't yet wrapped my own brain around its potential. I'm putting it out there for you guys because you deserve it. I'm simply astonished at how the channel has grown, and I feel the need to give back.

More Videos...


6-bolt 4g63 Kiggly Main Girdle Install
Ballos Precision Machine was nice enough to let me into their operations and film the installation of my 6-bolt Kiggly Main Girdle. They let me do this as a gift to all of you. THIS IS NOT THE FINAL INSTALLATION. Though all the parts were cleaned prior to pickup, they will be extensively cleaned again, and the fasteners installed finger-tight with red Loctite exactly 15mm above the surface of the main girdle and torqued in the proper torque sequence. My main caps were level and straight, the crank bore was straight to begin with, and had never been line bored following the original assembly at the factory.





GSX Block Preparation Part 1
Preparation for powder coating and Glyptal application. Audio track is an original performance by Rojo Del Chocolate. My block is being powder coated rather than painted. It's just something I do. The GSX had it on the last block so it's getting it again. Since the tools are so similar and the mess is the same, I'm going ahead and preparing it for the Glyptal application as well. These 2 coatings will require being baked separately. The powder coating is baked on at a hotter temperature than the Glyptal, so it's going first. The surface preparation instructions for Glyptal is as follows: Surface to be painted should be dry and free from dirt, wax, grease, rust and oil. Remove all grease and oil by washing surface with mineral spirits. Wipe or scrape off all loose dirt, rust or scale. The last sentence is what's covered in this video. The 2nd sentence happens next (although it's already degreased), and I'll get it back from powder coat with it in the state described in sentence #1 completed. If following these instructions to the letter of the law. Second and third opinions in... the main journal is fine. You'll notice that I didn't coat the main caps, or "suitcase handles". I'm not going to. You bang around on these installing and removing them, and I don't want to risk chipping them once they're coated. They're below the windage area, and there will also be an un-coated main bearing girdle down there. This video covered 25 hours of actual work. Yes, I kept changing into the same filthy clothes every shoot because I wanted it to look consistent. You have to take your time doing this kind of work, and be VERY VERY CAREFUL! If for some reason you're crazy enough to attempt what I do in this video, you do so at your own risk. This is an elective treatment that I've never done, but I am by no means the first person to do it. I'm learning about it just like the rest of you.





4g63 Balance Shaft Elimination - bearing modification
This is the first part of a two part series about balance shaft elimination on 4g series engines. This video details the bearings, the other video will cover the front case modifications. I've already got a low-def video of the front case mods, and I plan to re-shoot that one in HD when I'm in the assembly phase. It's linked in the video. The balance shafts are designed to cancel out harmonic vibrations caused by combustion and the spinning rotating assembly. They may offer a greater degree of comfort to the driver and passengers, but with that comfort comes a price. Often, when a 4g63 timing belt gives up, it's because the balance shaft belt breaks or comes loose and takes the timing belt out with it. When that happens, it can total your pistons, valves, damage the crankshaft, wrist pins, timing belt tensioner and crank angle sensor. Basically, it can total your motor. The balance shafts also have a combined weigh over 10 lbs and both are driven off the timing belt making them additional and heavy rotating mass. If you've got a lightweight flywheel but still have balance shafts, you have your priorities mixed up. So here's what you do with the bearings. It's easy. You can do this at home. You CAN do it with the motor in the car, BUT DON'T. You must enjoy punishment to do this like that. The end result will slightly increase your oil pressure, but usually not enough to cause concern unless you have a full-circumference bearing turbo, ball bearing turbo--with your oil feed coming off the oil filter housing. The head feed would be better in that case because it's regulated at 15 PSI.





Building a 4G63T Engine in 10 minutes
Engine building




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