Edelbrock RPM Olds 455 Head Porting

The scariest thing I ever did was port a set of new Edelbrock aluminum cylinder heads. My first attempt at porting any cylinder head. I raised the roof .200" and dropped the floor .040". It's best to leave the floor alone or raise it by filling with epoxy. Porting kit by Mondello.

More Videos...


CNC Cylinder Head porting and CNC Engine Blocks on the SAME Machine!
CENTROID ENGINE SHOP CNC Machining Center. 3 Machine tool in 1. CNC port cylinder heads and Blueprint and CNC machine engine blocks AND produce all kinds of CNC parts using the same machine.





CNC Cylinder Head Repairs
15D CNC Ported Racer Pro Hd Repairs . These Hds are Australian designed . They flow as good as any 15D hd and are a superb casting for modifying.





Cylinder Head 204 - Porting & Polishing
This is a first-generation 1992 1.6L Hyundai Elantra small-combustion-chamber head. Thats what it is. It's a J1 Elantra cylinder head. Good luck finding another one like it. (read more)... In Cylinder Head 106 I talked about the mainstream porting theories as they are discussed. We looked at a cylinder head that I have thousands of dollars of professional work performed on, and a bone-stock second-generation head that I didn't port. In this video I just might do something you haven't seen done before. For some, that may be uncomfortable. The port and polish job I perform here is what I think will work best for my current build. This is not an extreme killer port job. What will be different here is where port textures are concerned, I will be following the advice of a reputable source that will remain un-named. You're free to port yours differently than I do in this video, and I give you that out, around the 20 minute marker. The Hyundai is far from being an ultimate-performance build. It's a $400 box of scraps with nothing but time invested. It's perfect for this video. My finished product WILL be an improvement over what I had. I don't yet have access to a flow bench. I still have an achievement to un-lock. As far as you should be concerned with the techniques I employ... without flow numbers there is no evidence of what this will do, but we will gather lots of info from dynp sessions and drag strip time slips. If I could test it on a flow bench, I would. There are MANY, and when I say many, I mean thousands of flame war mongering pirates floating around on rough seas with a hair trigger cannon finger itching to fire if you port a head any differently than what the herd mentality says to do while porting a cylinder head. I cover the herd mentality because it has merit. It's been tested. Tried and true. But I don't follow it to the letter of the law. I'm definitely not here to de-bunk it. I would port a cylinder head differently for each build based on how that engine was used. There's an extremely valid reason why relating to air speed. It's not the texture of a port that maximizes the effect of fuel atomization, but the velocity of the air running through an x or y sized valve. The driving factor in this is the piston speed. I'm not going to give you the technical information, but will refer you to information about the Lovell factor. There's a better description of this in the links below, and even a calculator to help you find your engine's sweet spot. Why the Lovell factor is important: https://www.highpowermedia.com/blog/3346/the-effect-of-valve-size Lovell gas factor calculator: http://www.rbracing-rsr.com/lovellgascalc.html Only people who have flow testing equipment know for sure what really works and have the capability to produce a perfectly-matched port job for the ultimate performance build. Those guys know the definition of ultimate, and THEY are floating below the water Aegis-class submarines ready to blow your comment up if you don't know what you're talking about. They don't care if you're an armchair mechanic or a herd of pirates. I will say, they're zoomed in pretty close on me right now, and I'm expecting to take a few hits. My work will be tested based on Dyno and drag strip performance, and the results will be posted here. Fortunately, those kinds of videos are a WHOLE LOT EASIER TO MAKE!!!





Connecting Rods Machine Shop Video-Engine Building DVD
Buy the "Basic Engine Building" DVD http://store.boxwrench.net/Basic-Engine-Building-DVD_p_8.html Basic Engine Building DVD - Chapter 27: Connecting Rods By now the connecting rods are ready for pistons. We recommend having the machine shop clean your old pistons for you, if you plan to reuse them. It's not fun at all by hand. Here we show you how they install the rod pins into the connecting rods to connect with the pistons. Then they will measure the pistons to determine the final bore size of the cylinder walls before they are honed. BoxWrench.net is a community and resource designed for automotive enthusiasts. The Basic Engine Building DVD is over three hours of engine building that covers everything from removal and disassembly to final assembly and engine start-up. This is the ultimate DVD for any home mechanic or engine enthusiast that wants to see a complete rebuild from Teardown to Start-Up. This video can be used to learn how to work on almost any type of internal combustion engine including V8, V6, Straight 8, in-line 6 and even 4 cylinder engines. All of the interactive features and menus will not work over YouTube. This video is great for people interested in car repair, car care, and restoration. As well as hot rods, muscle cars, performance parts, and Boosting horsepower. It can also help you to gain knowledge for increasing fuel economy, how to lower your emissions, and covers preventative maintenance to avoid little things like overheating. Get the full DVD with all of the interactive menus, Tools section and engine Glossary terms here... http://store.boxwrench.net/Basic-Engine-Building-DVD_p_8.html Don't forget our Holley Installation & Tuning DVD. Sample clips on our youtube page and at our store here... http://store.boxwrench.net/Holley-Install-Tuning-DVD_p_12.html New Transmission DVDs and a Differential Rebuilding DVD just added. http://www.boxwrench.net Educating the Automotive Enthusiast BoxWrench on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/boxwrench




Follow