Datsun 1200 coupe a15

my 1970 datsun 1200 coupe with a lightly worked a15. has 32/36 carbie, extractors through a 2 inch pipe.

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This Nissan Fairlady 240Z Is An Otaku’s Dream Car
“This is where it all started, this is where the roots are,” says Glenn Chiou. “It has that ‘Z’ because of this car.” With a 1972 Nissan 240Z-L in his care, Chiou is already the owner of an exceedingly rare car in the U.S. He then used his knowledge of history and Nissan’s past to source unobtanium-grade parts from the period Datsun competition catalogue, which tastefully brings this car up a notch in performance but retains a completely authentic look. Drive Tastefully®

These Datsun 240Zs Are Animals to Drive
The only thing rarer than the sight of a Datsun 240Z in the English countryside is the sight of two 240Zs in the English countryside. Spend enough time on the backroads of Kent, however, and chances are Mel Streek and his son, Ollie, will scream past you in their pair of Z cars. Rest assured, you’ll have no trouble telling the two cars apart. The “Ratsun”–so nicknamed for its rough exterior–belongs to Mel, though after purchasing it he quickly found that he was seldom able to drive it because Ollie was always in it. This sent Ollie on a quest for a 240Z of his own, and he found it, in Copenhagen, in the form of a pristine 1973 model. This automotive odd couple can now be found barreling through the country lanes in tandem. Not that having his own Z has stopped Ollie from eyeballing his dad’s car–he’d like to own both. After all, Ollie’s car may be easier to drive, but it’s Mel’s that gets the attention of onlookers. “Mine’s the one that actually turns the heads,” says Mel, smiling proudly. For now, though, Ollie can take solace in the fact that these two Datsuns seem destined to share a garage–if not an owner–for a long time to come, as both of the Streek’s refuse to part with their 240Z. Drive Tastefully®

Dare to Be Different in a Datsun 240Z
Owner Dave Scholz, shares his connection with a Japanese cult classic that could easily be regarded as the 911 of Japan. Its iconic beauty, modular mechanics, and desirability inspired Dave to heed to Datsun's famous racing campaign of the '70s, "Dare to be different." American heads spun when the 1970s ultimately snuffed out their beloved horsepower-drunk muscle cars. As the world watched them squirm for performance, Japan was busy developing the 240Z to bring a new thrill to American roads using balance, harmony, and technology. "Datsun didn't invent the overhead cam engine, or disc brakes, or independent suspension but it has a habit of incorporating these sophisticated systems into brilliantly conceived and easily affordable cars." (Car and Driver; June, 1970) Drive Tastefully®