The Unfortunate History of the AMC Pacer

Behind all the jokes and insults, the AMC Pacer is actually a car with a great deal of history. It began as radical new design from an underdog company. In an attempt to combat the big, bland, boxy cars from Detroit's "Big Three," little American Motors Corporation decided to build something a little different. Their one-eyed car stylist Dick Teague proposed a small, wide car with big windows and smooth areodynamics. Americans had never seen anything like it. This in-depth documentary tells the true story of the Pacer. Unbeknownst to many, the car persevered through manufacturing setbacks, government regulations, and many other troubles. Featuring a ton of old car advertisements and rare footage of AMC's factory, the film helps paint a picture of the Pacer's world. Director Joe Ligo sits down with AMC stylist Vincent Geraci, author Patrick Foster, and television personalities John Davis and Pat Goss from PBS's MotorWeek.

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Worst Cars Ever Made
The ugliest and worst cars ever made. Pontiac Aztek, 1985 Yugo, Chevrolet Chevette. AMC Pacer/Gremlin and Ford Edsel.

Graveyards for Unsold Cars
When automakers have unsold cars, they often ship them to locations where the automobiles sit until they fall apart. An article in Zero Hedge claims the lots are vast graveyards for unsold cars, but other observers are challenging the charges. One of these massive parking lots for unsold cars is in Sheerness, in north Kent, England. There are hundreds of similar lots around the world, including more than 57,000 rotting cars in one location in Baltimore. The report claims sales of new cars has been declining over the last few years, leaving millions of cars without an owner. They sit in the giant lots, unused and unmaintained. As manufacturers produce more cars, the companies buy more land around the auto graveyards to contain the vehicles. Zero Hedge stated, "The car industry would never sell these cars at massive reductions in their prices to get rid of them, no they still want every buck. If they were to price these cars for a couple of thousand they would sell them. However, nobody would then buy any expensive cars and then they would end up being unsold." Many of these giant lots are visible on Google Maps, including a former test track in Sunderland, England. That track was recently closed due to the enormous number of unsold cars covering the grounds. The latest map views show the automobiles disappeared, according to Zero Hedge. Matt Hardigree, writing for Jalopnik, states that many of the pictures shown by Zero Hedge are old. He said, "Go back into the Getty or AFP or AP sources for these photos and you'll see, by and large, they're photos from the middle of the post-recession Carpocalypse when the car market collapsed in Europe and the United States." If the reports of auto gravelyards are true, this would not be the first time corporations have thrown away vast quantities of unsold product. In 1983, Atari buried tens of thousands of copies of their video Game, E.T. the Extraterrestrial, after suffering the worst failure ever in the history of electronic games. 124255 stuffing-record Download your free Next News "Heroes & Villains" Poster here: Donate USD: Donate BTC: LIVE: Facebook: Twitter: Sub: Meet the Next News Team: Hashtag: #N3 About: Next News Network's WHDT World News program airs daily at 6pm and 11pm Eastern on Comcast, DirecTV and Over-the-Air and Online at WHDT World News is available to 6 million viewers from South Beach to Sebastian, Florida and to 2 million viewers in Boston, Massachusetts via WHDN. WHDT broadcasts on RF channel 44 (virtual channel 9) from Palm City and is carried on cable TV channels 44 (SD) and 1044 (HD) by AT&T, on cable channels 17 (SD) and 438 (HD) in West Palm Beach by Comcast, on satellite channel 44 (SD) in West Palm Beach by DIRECTV, and on WHDN-Boston which broadcasts on RF channel 38 (virtual channel 6) from the Government Center district in downtown Boston. More about WHDT: #SR

Chrysler Turbine Car History
For decades, Chrysler worked on an alternative engine design that might have provided a very flexible alternative. It ended without fanfare in 1979, and was never picked up again - as far as we know. Richard Benner, Jr., wrote: "Mike Eberhart (who works here at Chrysler St. Louis) is the guy who take the vehicle around for shows all over the U.S. He gives rides in the vehicles (I have ridden 3 times) and for anyone who says they did ride it it, if they did, they sign into a log that is kept here at the St. Louis Museum of Transportation, who owns the vehicle. Mike just has it on loan to work on and transport it. He did much of the work himself to get it running and in the condition it is in." One turbine-powered car, not made by Chrysler, was entered into professional racing at the Indianapolis 500; the turbine itself was a standard aviation unit, and the car involved nearly won, but a bad wheel bearing took it out of the race. Turbine powered cars were then excluded from racing through rules

Collier Motors AMC (The Last AMC Dealership).