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Triumph Spitfire Commercial (70ties)

This is a quit rare commercial out of the seventies about the Triumph Spitfire... I hope, this upload doesn't bother anyone, because it is worth to see... ;) by the way, a very nice car... ;)


 


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Triumph TR4 (TRS) - 1961 Le Mans 24hrs (10th June 1961)
Triumph at Le Mans (1961) June 10th 1961 From the Standard Triumph archives Commentary by Raymond Baxter This is a promotional film produced by the Standard Triumph Motor Company of Coventry, England. The film documents the 1961 24hr of Le Mans and the 3 Triumph TR4S racing prototypes entered by the company. This was a follow up to a similar but less than successful effort by the company the previous year, which was also documented on film.





Triumph Spitfire | 1979 | Rear Crash Test | NHTSA | CrashNet1
1979 Triumph Spitfire NHTSA Rear Impact -- Thumbs up for the crash dummies! Do you think this vehicle is safe? Would you buy it? More crash tests every week: Favorite this video and subscribe to CrashNet1! http://youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=ikea55





1977 Triumph Spitfire 1500 Driving In Irvine, Ayrshire, Scotland (6oct2012)
I'd like to thank George for bringing up his 1977 Triumph Spitfire today. We worked together for many years and have kept in touch, both of us sharing an interest in classic cars. We were a bit pushed for time today, but managed to get some photos and video clips to post. Hopefully we will get another chance to record some more footage before the car has to be garaged because of the imminent winter and the salty roads that come with it here in the United Kingdom. The Triumph Spitfire is an excellent car, and was a direct compeditor for the MGB and MG Midget. I remember these driving around when they were new, when I was a young boy in the late 1970's. This particular model has a 1500cc engine and is quite nippy. It is more than capable of keeping up with modern traffic. We were discussing the driving and handling characteristics of old vs new cars today. Older cars have a rough edge, and I quite like that. People can argue that modern cars are much better, and dynamically they are right, I agree. But you feel much more part of the driving experience in an old car such as this. If you would like more information on the Triumph spitfire, here is a link for you. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triumph_Spitfire





Triumph Spitfire - 1965 Le Mans 24hrs (19th June 1965)
Spitfires at Le Mans (1965) June 19th 1965 From the Standard Triumph archives Commentary by Raymond Baxter This is a promotional film produced by the Standard Triumph Motor Company of Coventry, England. The film documents the 1965 24hr of Le Mans and the 4 Triumph Spitfire racing prototypes entered by the company.Triumph never identified their cars other than Spitfire racing prototypes with 1.1 litre inline 4 cylinder engines and aerodynamic hard tops.





Triumph Story
The Triumph Motor Company was a British car and motor manufacturing company. The Triumph marque (trade-name) is owned currently by BMW. The marque had its origins in 1885 when Siegfried Bettmann (1863--1951) of Nuremberg initiated S. Bettmann & Co and started importing bicycles from Europe and selling them with his own trade-name in London. The trade-name became "Triumph" the year next, and in 1887 Bettmann was joined by a partner, Moritz (Maurice) Schulte, also from Germany. Beginning in 1889 the businessmen started producing their own bicycles in Coventry, England. In November 1944 what was left of the Triumph Motor Company and the Triumph trade-name were bought by the Standard Motor Company and a subsidiary "Triumph Motor Company (1945) Limited" was formed with production transferred to Standard's factory at Canley, on the outskirts of Coventry. The pre-war Triumph models were not revived and in 1946 a new range of Triumphs was announced, starting with the Triumph Roadster. The Roadster had an aluminium body because steel was in short supply and surplus aluminium from aircraft production was plentiful. In the early 1950s it was decided to use the Triumph name for sporting cars and the Standard name for saloons and in 1953 the Triumph TR2 was initiated, the first of a series that would be produced until 1981.





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Practical Classics Magazine: Triumph Spitfire group test
Practical Classics Magazine. Journalist John Simister road tests a group of five very different classic Triumph Spitfires at a soaking wet Bruntingthorpe proving ground in the UK. Models include a standard Mk1 Spitfire, a car fitted with a Renault engine taken from an old Renault 5 GT turbo, a Macao racer replica and a Le-Mans spec Spitfire. Featured in the July 2011 issue of Practical Classics Magazine. Filmed in high definition on the Panasonic AG-AF101. Produced and edited by http://hamishscadding.co.uk





1971 & 1972 Triumph Stags
The Triumph Stag is a British car sold between 1970 and 1978 by the Triumph Motor Company, styled by Italian designer Giovanni Michelotti. Envisioned as a luxury sports car, the Triumph Stag was designed to compete directly with the Mercedes-Benz SL class models. All Stags were four-seater convertible coupés, but for structural rigidity -- and to meet new American rollover standards of the time -- the Stag required a B-pillar "roll bar" hoop connected to the windscreen frame by a T-bar. A removable hardtop was a popular factory option for the early Stags, and was later supplied as a standard fitment. The car started as a styling experiment cut and shaped from a 1963--4 Triumph 2000 pre-production saloon, which had also been styled by Michelotti, and loaned to him by Harry Webster, Director of Engineering at Triumph from the early to late 1960s. Their agreement was that if Webster liked the design, Triumph could use the prototype as the basis of a new Triumph model. Harry Webster, who was a long time friend of Giovanni Michelotti, whom he called "Micho", absolutely loved the design and spirited the prototype back to England. The end result, a two-door drop head (convertible), had little in common with the styling of its progenitor 2000, but retained the suspension and drive line. Triumph liked the Michelotti design so much that they propagated the styling lines of the Stag into the new T2000/T2500 saloon and estate model lines of the 1970s. 1972 Stag The initial Stag design was based around the saloon's 2.5-litre engine, and Harry Webster intended the Stag, large saloons and estate cars to use a new Triumph-designed overhead cam (OHC) 2.5-litre fuel injected (PI) V8. Under the direction of Harry Webster's successor, Spen King in 1968, the new Triumph OHC 2.5 PI V8 was enlarged to 2997 cc (3.0 litres) to increase torque. To meet emission standards in the USA, a key target market, the troublesome mechanical fuel injection was dropped in favour of dual Zenith-Stromberg 175 CDSE carburettors. A key aim of Triumph's engineering strategy at the time was to create a family of engines of different size around a common crankshaft. This would enable the production of power plants of capacity between 1.5 and 4 litres, sharing many parts, and hence offering economies of manufacturing scale and of mechanic training. A number of iterations of this design went into production, notably a slant four-cylinder engine used in the later Triumph Dolomite and Triumph TR7, and a variant manufactured by StanPart that was initially used in the Saab 99. The Stag's V8 was the first of these engines into production. Sometimes described as two four-cylinder engines Siamesed together, it is more correct to say that the later four-cylinder versions were half a Stag engine (the left half). It has sometimes been alleged that Triumph were instructed to use the proven all-aluminium Rover V8, originally designed by Buick, but claimed that it would not fit. Although there was a factory attempt by Triumph to fit a Rover engine, which was pronounced unsuccessful, the decision to go with the Triumph V8 was probably driven more by the wider engineering strategy and by the fact that the Buick's different weight and torque characteristics would have entailed substantial re-engineering of the Stag when it was almost ready to go on sale. Furthermore Rover, also owned by British Leyland, could not necessarily have supplied the numbers of V8 engines to match the anticipated production of the Stag anyway. As in the Triumph 2000 model line, monocoque construction was employed, as was fully independent suspension -- MacPherson struts in front, semi-trailing arms at the rear. Braking was by front disc and rear drum brakes, while steering was power-assisted rack and pinion. The Triumph Stag has sizeable club and owner support and a number of specialist suppliers. According to the main enthusiast club in the UK, approximately 9,000 Stags are believed to survive in the United Kingdom. The car's popularity is due to its performance, comparative rarity and its Michelotti styling. The problems associated with the car over the years have been solved by those enthusiast clubs supporting the Stag, elevating this classic to its intended place in popularity envisioned by its designers. In the James Bond film Diamonds Are Forever, Bond commandeers a 1970 Triumph Stag from a diamond smuggler SOURCE WIKIPEDIA





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