Welcome to Murray Country

Machines come and go, usually becoming the victims of human progress.. Murray Markwell of Southern Customs, in Pakenham Melbourne loves his American Muscle Cars, he also loves having a beer and having a chat. Murray is a walking talking encyclopedia of information about cars and car culture. Bandit Films were happy to go along for the ride and film this old NASCAR behemoth, a true testament to speed, power and money... Director: Aaron Cuthbert Director of Photography/ Editing/Colour Grade: Daniel De Silva Producer/ Photography: Tom Broadhurst Music: Title: The Outside Man theme music Composer: Michel Legrand About the Superbird: Developed specifically for NASCAR racing, the Superbird, a modified Road Runner/Belvedere, was Plymouth's follow-on design to the Charger Daytona fielded by sister company Dodge in the previous season. The Charger 500 version that began the 1969 season was the first American car to be designed aerodynamically using a wind tunnel and computer analysis, and later was modified into the Daytona version with nose and tail. The Superbird's smoothed-out body and nosecone were further refined from that of the Daytona, and the street version's retractable headlights added nineteen inches to the Road Runner's original length. The rear spoiler, or "wing", was mounted on tall vertical struts that put it into less disturbed air thus increasing the efficiency of the downdraft that it placed upon the car's rear axle. In street versions, it was designed to provide clearance for the trunklid to open freely. The rear-facing fender scoops were incorporated in an effort to ventilate trapped air from the wheel wells in order to facilitate brake cooling. A Mopar Orange Plymouth Superbird. In response, NASCAR's homologation requirement demanded that vehicles to be raced must be available to the general public and sold through dealerships in specific minimum numbers. For 1970, NASCAR raised the production requirement from 500 examples to one for every two manufacturer's dealers in the United States; in the case of Plymouth, that meant having to build 1,920 Superbirds. Due to increasing emissions regulations, combined with insurance hikes for high performance cars, 1970 was its only production year. "Superbird" decals were placed on the outside edges of the spoiler vertical struts featuring a picture of the Road Runner cartoon character holding a racing helmet. A smaller version of the decal appears on the driver side headlight door. Superbirds had three engine options: the 426 Hemi V8 engine, the 440 Super Commando with a single 4-barrel carburetor, or the 440 Super Commando Six Barrel with three two-barrel carburetors. Only 135 models were fitted with the 426 Hemi. As the 440 was less expensive to produce, the "Street" version of the 426 Hemi engine used in competition was homologated by producing the minimum number required. On the street, the nose cone and wing were very distinctive, but the aerodynamic improvements hardly made a difference there or on the drag strip. In fact, the 1970 Road Runner was actually quicker in the quarter mile and standard acceleration tests due to the increased weight of the Superbird's nose and wing. Only at speeds in excess of 90 mph (140 km/h) did the modifications show any benefit.

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Rancho Deluxe
"The year is 1947, an ex-serviceman returns home to Southern California. His old '32 Ford Roadster is removed from the shed, and the guts of a wrecked '39 Mercury sedan are transplanted in, giving more power, braking and top speed, essential for the dry lakes racing career he will embark on. He outfits the motor with products from the growing speed equipment industries catalogues, and races his car against fellow car club members and the clock. The car also serves as daily transport for him in the mild So Cal climate, the loud twin Exhausts upsetting the locals still not used to the returned soldiers need for peacetime thrills. The era immediately following WW2 in Southern California was the time frame and inspiration for me to build an accurate recreation of a stripped down, dry lakes racing, late forties street roadster. Something of a time machine, so that a drive down the street or across the state could become a journey back sixty years. Rancho Deluxe is my full time business, building traditional hotrod classics and components, and assembling period correct cars. The Rancho Deluxe roadster is my expression of a true Hot-Rod, a time machine back to when innovation was hand built, and the true test of man and machine was flat out across the Lakes" -Ben Thomas Owner of Rancho Deluxe Melbourne/ Australia ranchodeluxe.com.au/​ The above article taken from: Fuel Magazine Australia Issue No.4 fuelmagazine.bigcartel.com/​product/​fuel-magazine-issue-04 fuelzine.com Check out another article on Ben Thomas: mrblanc.com/​ben-thomas-at-rancho-deluxe/​ Director: Tom Broadhurst Director of Photography: Daniel De Silva Assistant Camera Operators Aaron Cuthbert Tom Broadhurst Editor/Color Grading Daniel De Silva Still Photographs Tom Broadhurst Music "Take the A Train by Bass, Bone, Blue" Gemma Boyd gemmaboyd.com soundcloud.com/​gemma-boyd Check us out at: banditfilms.blogspot.com/





Motor Town with Murray
Murray Markwell and his motors If you're into Gearhead motor talk then this film was made for you.. "You can't beat those cubes"





The Human Fog
Produced by Bandit Films: banditfilms.tumblr.com/ Nominated for best achievement in a screenplay at the 2012 St Kilda Film Festival (Melbourne Australia) Synopsis: Graham hasn't been outside his house for some time, preferring to exist within the solitude of his bunker like home. This morbid self-obsessed existence consists of smoking pot, listening to vinyl and flickering through high-speed Internet porn. With a rich inner narrative Graham ponders the personal anxieties that orbit within his cynical universe. Enter Billy, the unwanted visitor who interrupts Graham's morbid world. Billy is a confused mess, much to Graham's delight and misery. Written and Directed by Tom Broadhurst Produced by Gavin Spokes Edited by Paul Rowe Starring Lee Mason, Brett Swain and Georgia Bolton Directors of Photography Angus Kemp and Daniel De SilvaMusic Sound Design: Music and Effects musicandeffects.com "Autoluminescent" Written and performed by Rowland S. Howard Published by Ga Ga Music "Two Legged Dog" Written and performed by AFCGT Published by Sub Pop Records White Youth Worker written and performed by The Professional Savage "Are you good?" Written and Performed by David Lynch "Nothin" Written by Townes Van Zandt Performed by Rowland S. Howard Published by Native Tongue and Liberation Records





The Human Fog / Billy Dunlop
A man's mind is a hideous Jungle -Howard Jacobson




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