Drag Racing 1/4 Mile times 0-60 Dyno Fast Cars Muscle Cars

CRANKWALKED? 7-bolt teardown 1080HD

Now this is a story all about how My bearings got flipped-turned upside down And I'd like to take a minute just sit right there And tell you how I used to mix and burn my gas and my air. In RVA suburbs born and raised On the dragstrip is where I spent most of my days Chillin out, maxin, relaxing all cool, 'n all shooting some BS outside with my tools When a couple of guys who were up to no good Started running races in my neighborhood I heard one little knock and my rods got scared And said "You put it in the garage until you figure out where..." I Begged and pleaded that it not be that way, But it didn't want to start and run another day. I kissed it goodbye, because the motor punched its ticket I got out my camera, said "I might as well kick it." Crankwalk yo this is bad Drinking metal shavings from an oil pan. Is this what the rumor of crankwalk is like? Hmm this won't be alright But wait I heard knocking, grinding and all that Is this the type of failure that should happen to this cool cat? I don't think so, I'll see when I get there I hope they're prepared for this video I share. Well I pulled all the bolts and when I came out There were chunks in my fluids in the pan and they drained out I aint all depressed cause I seen this before. I got my books and my wrench and we'll do it once more. I sprang into action like lightning disassembled I whistled while I worked and my hands never trembled If anything you could say that this bling is rare, and when I saw what broke I stained my underwear. I turned off the air compressor 'bout 7 or 8 And I yelled to crankcase "Yo holmes, smell ya later" I looked at my internals they were finally there To sit on my workbench and stink up the air. Audio track by RojoDelChocolate. Here's the 48,000 mile-old 7-bolt I blew up summer 2011 after over 150 drag passes, a half dozen Dyno sessions, 4 transmissions, 3 clutches and 10 years of hard all-weather use.


 


More Videos...


Block Preparation Part 1
Preparation for powder coating and Glyptal application. Audio track is an original performance by Rojo Del Chocolate. My block is being powder coated rather than painted. It's just something I do. The GSX had it on the last block so it's getting it again. Since the tools are so similar and the mess is the same, I'm going ahead and preparing it for the Glyptal application as well. These 2 coatings will require being baked separately. The powder coating is baked on at a hotter temperature than the Glyptal, so it's going first. The surface preparation instructions for Glyptal is as follows: Surface to be painted should be dry and free from dirt, wax, grease, rust and oil. Remove all grease and oil by washing surface with mineral spirits. Wipe or scrape off all loose dirt, rust or scale. The last sentence is what's covered in this video. The 2nd sentence happens next (although it's already degreased), and I'll get it back from powder coat with it in the state described in sentence #1 completed. If following these instructions to the letter of the law. Second and third opinions in... the main journal is fine. You'll notice that I didn't coat the main caps, or "suitcase handles". I'm not going to. You bang around on these installing and removing them, and I don't want to risk chipping them once they're coated. They're below the windage area, and there will also be an un-coated main bearing girdle down there. This video covered 25 hours of actual work. Yes, I kept changing into the same filthy clothes every shoot because I wanted it to look consistent. You have to take your time doing this kind of work, and be VERY VERY CAREFUL! If for some reason you're crazy enough to attempt what I do in this video, you do so at your own risk. This is an elective treatment that I've never done, but I am by no means the first person to do it. I'm learning about it just like the rest of you.





Crankshaft Refurbishing
Many of you have seen this one before. I apologize if bringing it back offends anyone. Domestickilla gave me a crankshaft, and it's a nice one that I want to clean up and use again. You'll be seeing a lot of it and because of this, this video deserves to be here. I fixed what I broke, and this was my experience. In this video Ballos Precision Machine demonstrates magnetic dye penetrant testing, crankshaft polishing and inspecting the balance of a "butchered" 4g63 6-bolt crankshaft.





Cylinder Head 204 - Porting & Polishing
This is a first-generation 1992 1.6L Hyundai Elantra small-combustion-chamber head. Thats what it is. It's a J1 engine's cylinder head. In Cylinder Head 106 I talked about the mainstream porting theories as they are discussed. We looked at a cylinder head that I have thousands of dollars of professional work performed on, and a bone-stock second-generation head that I didn't port. In this video I just might do something you haven't seen done before. For some, that may be uncomfortable. The port and polish job I perform here is what I think will work best for my current build. This is not an extreme killer port job. What will be different here is where port textures are concerned, I will be following the advice of a reputable source that will remain un-named. You're free to port yours differently than I do in this video, and I give you that out, around the 20 minute marker. The Hyundai is far from being an ultimate-performance build. It's a $400 box of scraps with nothing but time invested. It's perfect for this video. My finished product WILL be an improvement over what I had. I don't yet have access to a flow bench. I still have an achievement to un-lock. As far as you should be concerned with the techniques I employ... without flow numbers there is no evidence of what this will do, but we will gather lots of info from dynp sessions and drag strip time slips. If I could test it on a flow bench, I would. There are MANY, and when I say many, I mean thousands of flame war mongering pirates floating around on rough seas with a hair trigger cannon finger itching to fire if you port a head any differently than what the herd mentality says to do while porting a cylinder head. I cover the herd mentality because it has merit. It's been tested. Tried and true. But I don't follow it to the letter of the law. I'm definitely not here to de-bunk it. I would port a cylinder head differently for each build based on how that engine was used. There's an extremely valid reason why relating to air speed. It's not the texture of a port that maximizes the effect of fuel atomization, but the velocity of the air running through an x or y sized valve. The driving factor in this is the piston speed. I'm not going to give you the technical information, but will refer you to information about the Lovell factor. There's a better description of this in the links below, and even a calculator to help you find your engine's sweet spot. Why the Lovell factor is important: https://www.highpowermedia.com/blog/3346/the-effect-of-valve-size Lovell gas factor calculator: http://www.rbracing-rsr.com/lovellgascalc.html Only people who have flow testing equipment know for sure what really works and have the capability to produce a perfectly-matched port job for the ultimate performance build. Those guys know the definition of ultimate, and THEY are floating below the water Aegis-class submarines ready to blow your comment up if you don't know what you're talking about. They don't care if you're an armchair mechanic or a herd of pirates. I will say, they're zoomed in pretty close on me right now, and I'm expecting to take a few hits. My work will be tested based on Dyno and drag strip performance, and the results will be posted here. Fortunately, those kinds of videos are a WHOLE LOT EASIER TO MAKE!!!





CAT Engine Teardown TimeLapse
This CAT diesel engine had a million miles on it and was in perfect condition upon inspection. Sindall Transportation in New Holland, PA did the disassembly.





Turbo Elantra Bearing Failure Diagnosis
I had time to look at this thing up close. Go through the oil system, and check out all the bearings. Looks like another good study for my oil system series because it's the opposite problem that my GSX experienced. High oil pressure can be remedied a number of ways, but left unchecked can actually take a toll on your bearings. The way your engine bearings work, the parts they suspend are supported only by an oil film layer, and flow needs to be right in order for it to work as an actual bearing. If the oil supply is insufficient, then it loses the ability to suspend the part causing it to crash into the bearing surface. If oil flow is too great, friction is increased, the flow becomes turbulent, and the oil film doesn't form properly. High oil pressure can float and spin rod bearings, and that's worst-case scenario. I had several un-favorable conditions going on inside this engine and that makes it a little bit difficult to link what my engine experienced to any one singular thing. I think it's easier to look at it like some sort of perfect storm. From sub-standard parts for how the engine components would be used, to oil pressure, to part fatigue, to part history to abuse... this thing's got a little bit of everything working against it and that's why it's such a hilarious car. It was given to me with one condition. "See what this thing will do, and see how long it goes before it breaks." My take on it is, the parts are still less than ideal, and they've still got life left in them. It's worth fixing. These parts are worthless as a race motor, and normally I'd have junked 'em, but it's the Hyundai.





JMS Racing - 906hp Evo - Forced Performance T3 HTA3794
Follow us on facebook! http://www.facebook.com/pages/JMS-Racing/168686186475891?ref=ts&fref=ts 210-310-1729 JMSTuning@gmail.com JMSRacing.net





Cylinder Head 205 - Degree DOHC Camshafts
This video is all about establishing your valve timing baseline, and adjusting your camshafts to the manufacturer's spec. It's only ONE of several steps that should be performed when you're assembling your engine on an engine stand. Establishing these conditions with accuracy while your engine installed in the car is a near-impossibility, and the reason why... is demonstrated in this video. There are several challenges to overcome when performing these procedures on a 4gxx series Mitsubishi engine, and they're all defeated here. The cylinder head used in this video is a J1 spec '92 Hyundai Elantra small-combustion chamber head which has had several valve jobs and has been resurfaced multiple times by budget engine remanufacturers who didn't care about quality control, as well as performance shops who do. It has had no less than .040" removed from the head gasket surface, the valves are recessed because of all the valve jobs performed, and at some point when it was cut, it wasn't level. Removing material from the deck surface will change the installed camshaft centerline, and that will change your engine's valve timing events even if all other parts remain the same. I would claim this is a multi-part video except that I've got the videos broken up by topic already, and this one is all about setting your cams to the manufacturer's specification. It is not the end of testing that will be performed with these tools. The basics concerning the process and tool fabrication are covered here. Further discussion on this topic concerning the effects of advancing or retarding camshafts from spec, and for checking your valve clearance will be in the videos that follow. I had to end this video after the manufacturer's spec was achieved to make it easier to digest, and because it would have created a video greater than one hour in length despite the break-neck speeds that things happen here on Jafromobile. Where your cams are set determine how the swept volume of the combustion chamber gets used. The information on the manufacturer's spec sheet is their recommendation for baseline settings that will help you get the most out of those camshafts. Whether or not your engine can operate with those specifications without additional hardware or without causing a catastrophic failure will be expanded upon in Cylinder Head 206. The next video should be used as a companion to this video because establishing the manufacturer's baseline is not the end of the assembly or testing process. It's only half the battle. Should you be lucky enough to find your combination of parts allow your camshafts to fit and requires no additional adjustment after assembly, the steps in this video and in Cylinder Head 206 should still be performed if you are doing the assembly yourself. Failure to inspect these variables may lead to a tuning nightmare once the engine is back in the car, hard starts, or worse... bent valves and damaged wrist pins. Making these tools and performing these steps will give you the peace of mind to know with certainty that your engine is operating safely at its peak performance.





Major Huge Announcement
This video is a quick update on the projects here on Jafromobile right now, as well as a tour and history lesson on my latest addition. I'm always hard at work to bring you all new material based on Mitsubishi production and partnerships from 1987-1999. Also covered are what's necessary to resurrect a car that's been sitting for many years. If it's got a 4g63, to me... it's always worth saving. My channel now has 4 Mitsubishi-powered projects in the works which should be capable of delivering tons of new material. I'd like to welcome all of you from the forums. My history with Mitsubishi began in 1997, and hasn't taken a day off since. Owning one of these has been long overdue for me, and you guys have been a wealth of knowledge that helped me along my travels. An asset to the DSM community, even though this isn't a DSM.





Hyundai Elantra 4g63 Shortblock Assembly
HOLD ON TIGHT! HERE WE GO! We begin the blueprint and assembly on my 1992 Hyundai Elantra's bastardized 4g63. The parts used in this are from a mash of different brands and models outside of the typical 2.0L 4g63, but the specs and standards I am following for its assembly are for the 2.0L DOHC. If you want to follow along in your service manual to verify what I've done here in this video, the processes we cover here detail pages 11C-95 through 11C-105 of the 1g Overhaul manual. I would prefer you not rip them from the binding and throw them away, relying only on this video for instruction... but rather use this video as a motivational guide, and as a demonstration of the techniques involved in those sections. You gotta do the cooking by the book. I never had any intention of making instructional videos on this particular car, but after it blew up I slowly realized it's actually a better case study for how a 4g63 ticks than anything else in my driveway. There are several reasons for this. One being that it's a mix of parts that shouldn't be bolted together, and the other is that many of you watching my videos aren't trying to build a 600hp engine out of aftermarket parts. You're trying to put back together what used to be your daily driver. This car covers those bases. Don't think for a second I won't go through this same trouble and level of detail for the GSX. I will. When I do, having this information in this video will give you a better understanding on how and why I do things the way I do when I get there. This was the shortest I could condense this video. I've never uploaded a video this long, and I hope I never have to do it again. It took a month to create on cutting-edge equipment, 16 hours to export, and 9 hours for YouTube to process. My script for the voiceover is 6 times longer than the whole script for the movie Pootie Tang. 6 times. Longer. Than a Hollywood movie.





1998 Civic Engine Tear Down (Part 4) - EricTheCarGuy
Link to full engine R&R video: http://www.ericthecarguy.com/vmanuals/22-vmanual-store/149-1998-honda-civic -16l-engine-replacement-vmanual http://www.ericthecarguy.com/ Remember this guy? Yep since I'm moving I had my scrap picked up and this was still in the shop collecting dust so I decided to do the tear down on it, I'm glad I did because I got a nice little keepsake out of it. BTW don't yell at me for using my impact lets face it, this engine is scrap! --- Click below and Stay Dirty Visit me at EricTheCarGuy.com http://ericthecarguy.com/ Visit EricTheCarGuy Forum http://www.ericthecarguy.com/forum/default.aspx Visit my Facebook Page: http://www.facebook.com/EricTheCarGuy --- Stay dirty ETCG





Building our "Nasty" 4G63 cylinder head at Force Engineering
This is a Time lapse video of Force Engineering building the "Nasty" 4G63 cylinder head. Video includes Valve job, un-shrouding, porting, decking, cleaning and assembly. All video was taken on site at Force Engineering. Actual time involved was about 10 hours worth of work.





Hyundai 4g63 Assembly Part 3
I have bad news. The big camera's playback heads bit the dust from extensive prolonged use. I wore out the tape drive. No manner of cleaning tapes can fix what it's been through. I've talked many times about how much footage goes into one of my 15 to 30 minute videos, and for every hour of video footage I've shot, the camera does double-duty because after shooting, it has to be played back in real time during capture. I've done more than 130 videos this way, probably over 2000 hours of use in the harshest of environments, and it just couldn't handle it any longer. I shot several more tapes beyond what's in this video that I can't even import because the play heads failed. I don't know if any of that video even stuck to the tapes? The lost footage from the last video was an early and un-recognized sign of what was soon to come. I know I joked about it, but in reality it's really not very funny at all. I can't afford a backup for a piece of equipment like this, so it's something I don't have. As bad as this news might feel to you, I feel it 21,000 times over and I mean that. This couldn't come at a worse time and expense for me, and at a point where my production was really starting to wrap up on this project to move on to bigger and better things. It's the only camera I have that can do what I do here on this channel, so I'm forced to stop production for now. Even though my camera is huge, 7 year old HDV technology, these things still sell for several thousand dollars used because they record un-compressed video unlike every other flash storage based solution available at twice the price. 3CCD 1080/60i HD cameras that shoot to tape have advantages that you can't affordably achieve with solid-state media. I have to use un-compressed footage to do what I do here or else there's nothing left of the video quality after 7 exports and a final mpeg compression. The Sony Action Cam can't do it, we learned that in a previous test video. Even if it could, it can't do close-ups and everything's fisheyed. Buying a low-end 4K camera is impractical because I can't efficiently or effectively edit that video without a $9,000 computer. Jafromobile is just not that big of a channel, and I do this completely un-sponsored and at my own expense with the help of a handful of friends who volunteer their talent, time and information. It's the epitome of low-budget and what it earns still doesn't come close covering the channel's equipment and expenses as they occur. People have urged that I do a kickstarter, but I can't bring myself to ask for that from the community. I don't sell a product or offer services so there is no profit margin. I can't accept money for something that happens only at the speed of my available resources. To me, this channel is my proverbial gift horse to all of you. http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/don't_look_a_gift_horse_in_the_mouth I know what you're thinking and I realize this is a grim conclusion to this video. It sounds like I'm down for the count, but don't rush to the down vote button just yet. As of the upload date of this video, I'm paying out of pocket to fix a ridiculously expensive 3CCD 1080HD broadcast quality video camera so that these projects can resume, and so that I can bring the final assembly steps to you in the same quality you've grown used to seeing here on Jafromobile. If I wear out a camera every 3 years, then so be it. This is love, and no expense is too great. The big camera is being fixed by its manufacturer, and I'm expecting the repair to cost as much as replacing it. I sincerely hope that's not the case. Hopefully my production only has to take a short break. Once production resumes and I can import these tapes, I've got some really awesome stuff coming up and I hope every last one of you is here to see it. I may have a few other backlogged nuggets I can upload, and as always I'm happy to discuss this in the comments and provide updates on the repair as I get them. Update: Awaiting quote due by 5/16 according to the repair agreement. 5/9/2014 9:17:00 AM DELIVERED NEWPORT NEWS, VA US 5/9/2014 5:36:00 AM DESTINATION SCAN NEWPORT NEWS, VA US 5/9/2014 12:04:00 AM ARRIVAL SCAN NEWPORT NEWS, VA US 5/12/2014 - Repair paid in full $440. Far less than I was expecting. I'm glad they still make parts for 7 year old professional equipment. Thank You Canon, USA! Repair should be complete within 7 business days from receipt of payment. The quote only took them 24 hours and they quoted a week just for the estimate, so at this rate I should be back up and running once again very soon. Thank ALL of you for your kind words, HUGE generosity, and all of the moral support. I swear I have the best subscribers on YouTube!





Marios Eclipse GSX 400HP ST2 project
HEY HOWS IT GOING, IV BEEN BUILDING THIS CAR OVER THE LAST YEAR AND AM PLANNING TO RACE IT NEXT SEASON IN THE NASA ST2 CLASS. I USED TO HAVE MY PRO LICENSE ROADRACING STREETBIKES BUT BROKE MY NECK A LITTLE OVER 5 YEARS AGO NOW SO IM NOW A C5-C6 QUADRIPLEGIC. SO I BASICALLY JUST PREMATURELY GRADUATED FROM 2 WHEELS TO 4... LOL THE CAR SHOULD BE PRETTY FUN ONCE I GET A NEW TRANNY FOR IT IT WILL DO PRETTY WELL I THINK. ILL POST MORE THROUGH OUT THE SEASON. CHECK OUT MY BLOG AT KEEPEMSPINNINRACING.BLOGSPOT.COM THANKS FOR WATCHING AND GOD BLESS.





Blueprint 101 - Using Micrometers, Calipers, & Bore Gauges
If you're going to rebuild an engine, this video is required material. None of your measurements mean anything if they're not accurate. I illustrate the calibration and use of 3 major tools needed for taking measurements, and a brief demonstration of how they work. These are by no means the ONLY ways to use or calibrate these tools. This is simply the method I will employ to measure parts in later videos so this instruction doesn't distract from their intended messages. Even if you're familiar with these tools, you may find something useful here, or even be able to correct me and my rusty skills.





Cylinder Head 206 - Valve Clearance (& LSA)
This video is the companion and continuation video for Cylinder Head 205. In Cylinder Head 205 we covered the tools and technique for setting valve timing versus the factory-recommended specifications. It didn't work, thus; this video. How do I know it didn't work? Watch this video. The reason this is a companion video is because anyone changing their valve timing must also CHECK their valve clearance or risk bending valves. If I can install aftermarket cams, then I have made significant changes to my valve clearance. If I move cam gears on an engine that was previously running, then I have made significant changes to my valve clearance. If I have milled my head or block, I have made significant changes to my valve clearance. If I have installed larger valves, I have made significant changes to my valve clearance. Mitsubishi doesn't build a whole lot of wiggle room into their valvetrains. They keep the valves pretty tight to maximize performance and a 4g63 IS an interference engine. Note that if you follow the recommendations in this video and damage your valvetrain that I am not responsible. Here I demonstrate all of the techniques to ensure that damage never occurs because these tests are performed PRIOR to the engine ever starting, and prove that clearance is adequate for THE PARTS I SHOW HERE ON CAMERA. There can be components installed in other rotating assemblies that require additional clearance to be built into your valve clearance such as aluminum rods, or other alloys employed in the casting and forging of rotating assembly parts and valves. I strongly urge you to check with those manufacturers for their recommendations regarding thermal expansion, stretch, bounce rocker gap or float prior to making any adjustments, and use this video only as a documentation of my experience. In other words, it's my opinion. What works in your engine will likely be very different from mine, but the tests and the math shown here will work the same with your build. To find your intake valve clearance... Add your intake valve opening degrees (btdc) to your intake valve closing degrees (abdc) to 180°. IO + IC + 180 = DURATION DURATION ÷ 2 = LOBE CENTERLINE LOBE CENTERLINE - IO = INSTALLED INTAKE CENTERLINE To find your Exhaust valve clearance... Add your Exhaust valve opening degrees (bbdc) to your intake valve closing degrees (atdc) to 180°. EO + EC + 180 = DURATION DURATION ÷ 2 = LOBE CENTERLINE LOBE CENTERLINE - EC = INSTALLED Exhaust CENTERLINE To get your Lobe Separation Angle, ADD your INSTALLED INTAKE CENTERLINE to your INSTALLED Exhaust CENTERLINE and divide that result by 2. Intake Centerline + Exhaust Centerline ÷ 2 = LSA Tight Lobe Separation Angles * MOVE TORQUE LOWER IN THE POWER BAND * INCREASE MAXIMUM TORQUE OUTPUT * INCREASE CYLINDER PRESSURE * INCREASE CRANKING COMPRESSION * INCREASE EFFECTIVE COMPRESSION * INCREASE COMBUSTION CHAMBER SCAVENGING EFFECT * SHORTEN YOUR POWER BAND * REDUCE IDLE VACUUM! * REDUCE IDLE STABILITY * INCREASE LIKELIHOOD OF KNOCK! * INCREASE OVERLAP * DECREASE PISTON TO VALVE CLEARANCE! Wide Lobe Separation Angles * MOVE TORQUE HIGHER IN THE POWER BAND * DECREASE MAXIMUM TORQUE OUTPUT * LENGTHEN YOUR POWER BAND * DECREASE CYLINDER PRESSURE * DECREASE LIKELIHOOD OF KNOCK * DECREASE CRANKING COMPRESSION * DECREASE EFFECTIVE COMPRESSION * INCREASE IDLE VACUUM * IMPROVE IDLE STABILITY * DECREASE OVERLAP * DECREASE COMBUSTION CHAMBER SCAVENGING EFFECT * INCREASE PISTON TO VALVE CLEARANCE There's more that I want to say about Lobe Separation Angle (LSA). If you're tuning a DOHC engine with cam gears, you're very lucky to go through all this trouble. The pushrod and SOHC crowd can't change their lobe separation angles without replacing their camshaft, and on many engines that means removing the cylinder heads. On a 4g63 with adjustable gears, you loosen the lock bolts, turn, lock it back down and you've adjusted your LSA. This is a luxury which if you've never had to build a SOHC or a pushrod engine and install camshafts that you take for granted. DOHC tuning permits the ability to alter the opening and closing events of the valves independently of one another and perfect the valve timing during tuning without having to completely remove and replace the valvetrain. What this also means is that the pushrod crowd needs to know and understand a lot more about their camshaft profiles prior to making their purchase as we [the DOHC crowd] do. They have to be on their A-game when they drop the coin on a new cam or else things get expensive really quick. Lobe separation angle says more about how camshafts behave than duration and lift, but all 3 should be carefully scrutinized when you're making that determination. Yes, I did actually animate my engine's valve timing exactly the way HKS said to set it up. Yes those are all actual photos of my parts. Yes that was the biggest Photoshop file I've ever created.




Which car is faster? Which Car is Faster?





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