CRANKWALKED? 7-bolt teardown 1080HD

Now this is a story all about how My bearings got flipped-turned upside down And I'd like to take a minute just sit right there And tell you how I used to mix and burn my gas and my air. In RVA suburbs born and raised On the dragstrip is where I spent most of my days Chillin out, maxin, relaxing all cool, 'n all shooting some BS outside with my tools When a couple of guys who were up to no good Started running races in my neighborhood I heard one little knock and my rods got scared And said "You put it in the garage until you figure out where..." I Begged and pleaded that it not be that way, But it didn't want to start and run another day. I kissed it goodbye, because the motor punched its ticket I got out my camera, said "I might as well kick it." Crankwalk yo this is bad Drinking metal shavings from an oil pan. Is this what the rumor of crankwalk is like? Hmm this won't be alright But wait I heard knocking, grinding and all that Is this the type of failure that should happen to this cool cat? I don't think so, I'll see when I get there I hope they're prepared for this video I share. Well I pulled all the bolts and when I came out There were chunks in my fluids in the pan and they drained out I aint all depressed cause I seen this before. I got my books and my wrench and we'll do it once more. I sprang into action like lightning disassembled I whistled while I worked and my hands never trembled If anything you could say that this bling is rare, and when I saw what broke I stained my underwear. I turned off the air compressor 'bout 7 or 8 And I yelled to crankcase "Yo holmes, smell ya later" I looked at my internals they were finally there To sit on my workbench and stink up the air. Audio track by RojoDelChocolate. Here's the 48,000 mile-old 7-bolt I blew up summer 2011 after over 150 drag passes, a half dozen Dyno sessions, 4 transmissions, 3 clutches and 10 years of hard all-weather use.

More Videos...


7-Bolt Shortblock Failure - Full Diagnosis
If you are your own mechanic, there is no more important character trait worthy of development than the ability to own your mistakes. That's where the line is drawn between good mechanics and bad mechanics. It's not the failures but how they deal with them that measures their ability. In short, it's not easy to admit you did something wrong or were negligent. But if you don't own it and talk about it, it doesn't get fixed, and nothing positive can come from it. It was my quest to overcome my clutch issue that lead to the creation of a video. That video is the textbook perfect guide for how to correctly install a DSM transmission. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6bE_9sWtnSY&list=PL4B97C16D423317DD Crankwalk as described is caused by a casting defect. This was not a defect. This was preventable. A lot of people would find something like this and not tell anyone out of embarrassment. I'm not ashamed. It's my fault. I got good use out of this engine and it was tough enough to make it 48K miles since the last rebuild despite my abuse. I'm here to tell you if you bought a used car that's had its clutch replaced, or if you ever pay someone else to do it... make sure it has this bolt. It's stashed away between the starter and the transfer case, so it's hard to see. Make sure all of your bell housing bolts are torqued properly because fastener problems can destroy your shortblock, clutch and transmission. If your car fails because of a mis-aligned transmission, you have no reason to blame crankwalk. It wasn't until I bought my next AWD car that I discovered there was a smaller bolt on the other side of the block. I destroyed 3 transmissions in the GSX first. With the damage already done to my crankshaft, I then lost a shortblock. It's an ounce of prevention that's worth metric tons on your bank account. Grade 10 M8x60 bell housing bolt = MD706012. It gets 22-25'lbs of torque. Owning my mistake permits me to learn from it through con$equence$, and never repeat it. What good would it have done anyone else for me to learn this lesson and not share it? That's why I'm providing this video to all of you. Sharing it can perhaps help someone else avoid this costly mistake. This is the final chapter for my 7-bolt, and this book is going back on the shelf. Here are some valuable resources if you're trying to read bearing damage: http://www.enginebuildermag.com/Article/5150/csi_engine_bearings_when_good_ bearings_go_bad.aspx http://catalog.mahleclevite.com/bearing/ http://www.studebaker-info.org/tech/Bearings/CL77-3-402.pdf And of course, now that I've covered the complete oil system, transmission and driveshaft series of videos, you now have all the tools necessary to ensure your 4g63 lasts a very long time. Whether the casting defect exists?... or it's all caused by a bolt, or the harmonics, or whatever... Sure, crankwalk exists and it's horrible. But with the small amount of movement required for your crankshaft before it contacts the block isn't far enough to make your clutch drop to the floor when you turn. You'd be hearing woodpeckers and jackhammers on the crank long before that clutch pedal would fall to the floor. Some people are going to hate on me for saying that. That's fine. I believe all of the people who experienced the clutch pedal issues had fastener problems on their bell housing. DSMs get a bad reputation for this but we can change that. Crankwalk is never the cause of your engine failure. Crankwalk is always a symptom of the real problem. It's your disease that makes you deny it's your fault. You've got the 'itis. DSM-itis. Whenever you dig deeper, you'll discover what applied all of those thrust loads to your crankshaft to begin with, and it's not going to be a casting defect that moves your crank .101". Mine only went .014", but all of the same parts failed. PLEASE tell me in the comments if you find this bolt is missing from your car.





Hyundai Assembly 1 - Blueprint Everything
HOLD ON TIGHT! HERE WE GO! We begin the blueprint and assembly on my 1992 Hyundai Elantra's bastardized 4g63. The parts used in this are from a mash of different brands and models outside of the typical 2.0L 4g63, but the specs and standards I am following for its assembly are for the 2.0L DOHC. If you want to follow along in your service manual to verify what I've done here in this video, the processes we cover here detail pages 11C-95 through 11C-105 of the 1g Overhaul manual. I would prefer you not rip them from the binding and throw them away, relying only on this video for instruction... but rather use this video as a motivational guide, and as a demonstration of the techniques involved in those sections. You gotta do the cooking by the book. I never had any intention of making instructional videos on this particular car, but after it blew up I slowly realized it's actually a better case study for how a 4g63 ticks than anything else in my driveway. There are several reasons for this. One being that it's a mix of parts that shouldn't be bolted together, and the other is that many of you watching my videos aren't trying to build a 600hp engine out of aftermarket parts. You're trying to put back together what used to be your daily driver. This car covers those bases. Don't think for a second I won't go through this same trouble and level of detail for the GSX. I will. When I do, having this information in this video will give you a better understanding on how and why I do things the way I do when I get there. This was the shortest I could condense this video. I've never uploaded a video this long, and I hope I never have to do it again. It took a month to create on cutting-edge equipment, 16 hours to export, and 9 hours for YouTube to process. My script for the voiceover is 6 times longer than the whole script for the movie Pootie Tang. 6 times. Longer. Than a Hollywood movie.





New Year's Eve Hyundai Teardown
It goes like this. One of the best friends I've ever had built this car from junk parts. He said it best, "it was built from literally a box of scraps". It ran an 13.2 in the quarter mile using no aftermarket performance parts of any kind. That quarter mile time was limited by traction. I know this car had more in it, but I never managed to get it to stick before encountering this. More on this build... The proper bolts were not always available, but the builder knows isht from Shinola. Even though this engine defies all engineering logic from Mitsubishi, the builder knew what would work and what would not. Budget was of the most primary of his concerns, and it shows at every turn, and it's what brought us to the kind of failure we find in this video. I asked him what bearings he used. He said, "...the least expensive ones I could find. Picture Aluglides. Now picture generic Aluglides. I paid half-as-much for those bearings as I would for generic Aluglides. Bolt too long? Put a nut on it and shorten it. Oil pan too close to the pickup? Hammer a big dent in it to make clearance for it. Wrong water pipe? Put a brass hardware store tee in the line to tap a turbo coolant feed. Forget buying ARP's, this is an all-standard re-used factory fastenere'd no-oil-squirter .030"-overbore 6-bolt with the cut-off balance shaft mod. It's using a small combustion chamber head off of a 1.6L Mirage with a 2.0L non-turbo block. The plug wires are used. The radiator hoses were used. Everything but the head gasket came from a junk car. The FWD turbo gearbox is from my 150,000 mile old Plymouth Laser that donated the block to the Colt. This is one of the most amusing cars I've ever wrapped my fingers around because of these kinds of character-building attributes. Nevermind that the chassis has less than 70,000 miles on it (not bad for a '92), it's just that it's built without using any new parts. Parts were substituted when they were not available, and it's ridiculously powerful. Thank you Jamie. You discovered your answer. I'm happy to help. I'll be changing some things like the oil pan bolts, bearing quality, some of the plumbing and fixing a few wiring harness problems, but I'm not changing anything else if I can avoid it. This car was never intended to have anything upgraded to deliver raw power, and I'll do my best to keep it that way, replacing and restoring what failed so that we can keep pushing these generic non-turbo .030" over pistons to the limit. Apparently, 24 PSI from a 14b is not enough. In the meantime, my diagnosis is that excessive oil pressure lead to the breakdown of the #1 bearing. After all, it's the 1st bearing in-line in the oil system on the main gallery. It's the most isolated from clutch harmonics, yet it was the one that spun. The #1 bearing supplies the oil pump. The teardrop on the head is nearly gone from head resurfacing, and this is a no-balance-shaft no-oil-squirter block. I think high oil pressure is why it falls on its face above 6000 rpms. There's a restriction upstream from the lifters and they deflate at high RPMs, losing lift. I'll fix it. I've got the parts.





Porting an eBay 20g turbocharger
The price of this turbo will make it a popular purchase, so I figured I'd air out some tech about ways to improve it. This thing is not for everybody. I wouldn't feel comfortable bolting it on my car the way it comes out of the box. I could complain about its flaws except that so far absolutely none of them have been a deal-breaker for me. To me it's like an empty canvas. I promise to eat those words if it happens, and share my poop. Usually I can easily correct these flaws myself and so can you. BUT! If this thing turns out to perform well with what I do to it... It could easily be a cheap, quick ticket to an 11-second car. Something you could do with a free running 1g, a hacksaw, and about $500 worth of fuel upgrades. Yeah, that would be ridiculous, and I'm bolting it onto a well-modified car... But that being possible speaks volumes for what a DSM can really do. This is no big deal to me. I'd rather guinea pig my car for you in HD so you guys can decide whether or not you'd spend your money on this. Really it's an experiment because this isn't my daily-driver, and it contributes to building a better Colt. Tools I used involve: Scratch awl Milwaukee model ???? 1/4" straight-shaft electric DIY grinder Cone and ball-shaped double-cut burs 180 grit high-speed flap wheel Dremel with a flex-shaft and a tiny 320-grit flap wheel a zip tie 10mm combination wrench tiny flat-blade screwdriver (00) for the e-clip on the wastegate compressed air




Follow