Drag Racing 1/4 Mile times 0-60 Dyno Fast Cars Muscle Cars

CRANKWALKED? 7-bolt teardown 1080HD

Now this is a story all about how My bearings got flipped-turned upside down And I'd like to take a minute just sit right there And tell you how I used to mix and burn my gas and my air. In RVA suburbs born and raised On the dragstrip is where I spent most of my days Chillin out, maxin, relaxing all cool, 'n all shooting some BS outside with my tools When a couple of guys who were up to no good Started running races in my neighborhood I heard one little knock and my rods got scared And said "You put it in the garage until you figure out where..." I Begged and pleaded that it not be that way, But it didn't want to start and run another day. I kissed it goodbye, because the motor punched its ticket I got out my camera, said "I might as well kick it." Crankwalk yo this is bad Drinking metal shavings from an oil pan. Is this what the rumor of crankwalk is like? Hmm this won't be alright But wait I heard knocking, grinding and all that Is this the type of failure that should happen to this cool cat? I don't think so, I'll see when I get there I hope they're prepared for this video I share. Well I pulled all the bolts and when I came out There were chunks in my fluids in the pan and they drained out I aint all depressed cause I seen this before. I got my books and my wrench and we'll do it once more. I sprang into action like lightning disassembled I whistled while I worked and my hands never trembled If anything you could say that this bling is rare, and when I saw what broke I stained my underwear. I turned off the air compressor 'bout 7 or 8 And I yelled to crankcase "Yo holmes, smell ya later" I looked at my internals they were finally there To sit on my workbench and stink up the air. Audio track by RojoDelChocolate. Here's the 48,000 mile-old 7-bolt I blew up summer 2011 after over 150 drag passes, a half dozen Dyno sessions, 4 transmissions, 3 clutches and 10 years of hard all-weather use.


 


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7-Bolt Shortblock Failure - Full Diagnosis
If you are your own mechanic, there is no more important character trait worthy of development than the ability to own your mistakes. That's where the line is drawn between good mechanics and bad mechanics. It's not the failures but how they deal with them that measures their ability. In short, it's not easy to admit you did something wrong or were negligent. But if you don't own it and talk about it, it doesn't get fixed, and nothing positive can come from it. It was my quest to overcome my clutch issue that lead to the creation of a video. That video is the textbook perfect guide for how to correctly install a DSM transmission. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6bE_9sWtnSY&list=PL4B97C16D423317DD Crankwalk as described is caused by a casting defect. This was not a defect. This was preventable. A lot of people would find something like this and not tell anyone out of embarrassment. I'm not ashamed. It's my fault. I got good use out of this engine and it was tough enough to make it 48K miles since the last rebuild despite my abuse. I'm here to tell you if you bought a used car that's had its clutch replaced, or if you ever pay someone else to do it... make sure it has this bolt. It's stashed away between the starter and the transfer case, so it's hard to see. Make sure all of your bell housing bolts are torqued properly because fastener problems can destroy your shortblock, clutch and transmission. If your car fails because of a mis-aligned transmission, you have no reason to blame crankwalk. It wasn't until I bought my next AWD car that I discovered there was a smaller bolt on the other side of the block. I destroyed 3 transmissions in the GSX first. With the damage already done to my crankshaft, I then lost a shortblock. It's an ounce of prevention that's worth metric tons on your bank account. Grade 10 M8x60 bell housing bolt = MD706012. It gets 22-25'lbs of torque. Owning my mistake permits me to learn from it through con$equence$, and never repeat it. What good would it have done anyone else for me to learn this lesson and not share it? That's why I'm providing this video to all of you. Sharing it can perhaps help someone else avoid this costly mistake. This is the final chapter for my 7-bolt, and this book is going back on the shelf. Here are some valuable resources if you're trying to read bearing damage: http://www.enginebuildermag.com/Article/5150/csi_engine_bearings_when_good_ bearings_go_bad.aspx http://catalog.mahleclevite.com/bearing/ http://www.studebaker-info.org/tech/Bearings/CL77-3-402.pdf And of course, now that I've covered the complete oil system, transmission and driveshaft series of videos, you now have all the tools necessary to ensure your 4g63 lasts a very long time. Whether the casting defect exists?... or it's all caused by a bolt, or the harmonics, or whatever... Sure, crankwalk exists and it's horrible. But with the small amount of movement required for your crankshaft before it contacts the block isn't far enough to make your clutch drop to the floor when you turn. You'd be hearing woodpeckers and jackhammers on the crank long before that clutch pedal would fall to the floor. Some people are going to hate on me for saying that. That's fine. I believe all of the people who experienced the clutch pedal issues had fastener problems on their bell housing. DSMs get a bad reputation for this but we can change that. Crankwalk is never the cause of your engine failure. Crankwalk is always a symptom of the real problem. It's your disease that makes you deny it's your fault. You've got the 'itis. DSM-itis. Whenever you dig deeper, you'll discover what applied all of those thrust loads to your crankshaft to begin with, and it's not going to be a casting defect that moves your crank .101". Mine only went .014", but all of the same parts failed. PLEASE tell me in the comments if you find this bolt is missing from your car.





Block Preparation Part 1
Preparation for powder coating and Glyptal application. Audio track is an original performance by Rojo Del Chocolate. My block is being powder coated rather than painted. It's just something I do. The GSX had it on the last block so it's getting it again. Since the tools are so similar and the mess is the same, I'm going ahead and preparing it for the Glyptal application as well. These 2 coatings will require being baked separately. The powder coating is baked on at a hotter temperature than the Glyptal, so it's going first. The surface preparation instructions for Glyptal is as follows: Surface to be painted should be dry and free from dirt, wax, grease, rust and oil. Remove all grease and oil by washing surface with mineral spirits. Wipe or scrape off all loose dirt, rust or scale. The last sentence is what's covered in this video. The 2nd sentence happens next (although it's already degreased), and I'll get it back from powder coat with it in the state described in sentence #1 completed. If following these instructions to the letter of the law. Second and third opinions in... the main journal is fine. You'll notice that I didn't coat the main caps, or "suitcase handles". I'm not going to. You bang around on these installing and removing them, and I don't want to risk chipping them once they're coated. They're below the windage area, and there will also be an un-coated main bearing girdle down there. This video covered 25 hours of actual work. Yes, I kept changing into the same filthy clothes every shoot because I wanted it to look consistent. You have to take your time doing this kind of work, and be VERY VERY CAREFUL! If for some reason you're crazy enough to attempt what I do in this video, you do so at your own risk. This is an elective treatment that I've never done, but I am by no means the first person to do it. I'm learning about it just like the rest of you.





Cylinder Head 105 - Valve Job Basics
Valves not sealing? Valves not bent? This is how you fix that problem. In this video I outline the basic valve job procedure. Cleaning the valves, cleaning the seats, cleaning the combustion chamber and lapping the valves in to make a better seal. Here I cover the process start-to-finish. It's the same exact process for pretty much all non-rotary combustion engines. It takes patience and perseverance to do this job, but anyone can do it. Reference your service manual for measurements and service limits. Everything else that's not in your service manual is in this video. I apologize for not having broken busted crap to work with in this video. It's more beneficial to all of you when bad fortune falls on me because it gets well documented, and many people watching these videos are looking for answers. If you have bent valves, you will discover it quickly once you chuck one up in the drill. You'll see the face of the valve wobble around while it spins. You'll see evidence of this damage on the valve seat. If it's bad, you may see damage on the valve guides in the form of cracks or missing pieces where the valve guides protrude through the head ports. Give all that stuff a good visual inspection. ...and if you doubt yourself, never hesitate to get a second opinion or consult a machine shop. They will have access to expensive tools that you wont find in your average gearhead's garage.





1998 Civic Engine Tear Down (Part 4) - EricTheCarGuy
Link to full engine R&R video: http://www.ericthecarguy.com/vmanuals/22-vmanual-store/149-1998-honda-civic -16l-engine-replacement-vmanual http://www.ericthecarguy.com/ Remember this guy? Yep since I'm moving I had my scrap picked up and this was still in the shop collecting dust so I decided to do the tear down on it, I'm glad I did because I got a nice little keepsake out of it. BTW don't yell at me for using my impact lets face it, this engine is scrap! --- Click below and Stay Dirty Visit me at EricTheCarGuy.com http://ericthecarguy.com/ Visit EricTheCarGuy Forum http://www.ericthecarguy.com/forum/default.aspx Visit my Facebook Page: http://www.facebook.com/EricTheCarGuy --- Stay dirty ETCG





Glyptal Application Process
In this video I detail the application process of a popular crankcase coating... that is... if crankcase coatings are actually popular. In this video, 98 coffee filters gave up the ghost. 238 q-tips paid the ultimate sacrifice. Almost a dozen brushes were executed, and 3 aerosol caps dispatched to their graves. Also, during the battle, several Dremel tools were maimed, one severely. Look, I'm doing everything I can to liven this topic up and make it interesting. Cleaning and painting are about the least interesting things someone else can watch. It's absolutely painful to edit, I know that much. It's not so bad for the guy doing the actual painting, but I'm doing my best to keep people's attention. This is a full month's work in a half hour. I had to space the job out because of my filming environment and the toxicity of materials I was working with. Take my warnings and advice in the video seriously. They're the words of someone who's done the job. They help set expectations. The most useful thing I can do is post links to other discussions that have already occurred, and to make room for places where people have posted their experience with failures of engine coatings. Despite my searching, I can not find any pictures or video. I found ONE plausible description of the kind of failure that can occur with improper application, but it was still a third-hand report. There are fans of this product posting in these threads. If you are considering this treatment, WEIGH THE PROS & CONS FOR YOUR BUILD, and YOUR HEALTH. Don't do this just because I did it. So until anyone provides photo or video evidence, here are the links to threads where it was discussed. This google search is mean. It's too direct and to-the-point. It might hurt somebody's feelings? Yes, I've read them all. http://www.google.com/search?client=safari&rls=en&q=glyptal+caused+engine+f ailure&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8





Cylinder Head 204 - Porting & Polishing
This is a first-generation 1992 1.6L Hyundai Elantra small-combustion-chamber head. Thats what it is. It's a J1 engine's cylinder head. In Cylinder Head 106 I talked about the mainstream porting theories as they are discussed. We looked at a cylinder head that I have thousands of dollars of professional work performed on, and a bone-stock second-generation head that I didn't port. In this video I just might do something you haven't seen done before. For some, that may be uncomfortable. The port and polish job I perform here is what I think will work best for my current build. This is not an extreme killer port job. What will be different here is where port textures are concerned, I will be following the advice of a reputable source that will remain un-named. You're free to port yours differently than I do in this video, and I give you that out, around the 20 minute marker. The Hyundai is far from being an ultimate-performance build. It's a $400 box of scraps with nothing but time invested. It's perfect for this video. My finished product WILL be an improvement over what I had. I don't yet have access to a flow bench. I still have an achievement to un-lock. As far as you should be concerned with the techniques I employ... without flow numbers there is no evidence of what this will do, but we will gather lots of info from dynp sessions and drag strip time slips. If I could test it on a flow bench, I would. There are MANY, and when I say many, I mean thousands of flame war mongering pirates floating around on rough seas with a hair trigger cannon finger itching to fire if you port a head any differently than what the herd mentality says to do while porting a cylinder head. I cover the herd mentality because it has merit. It's been tested. Tried and true. But I don't follow it to the letter of the law. I'm definitely not here to de-bunk it. I would port a cylinder head differently for each build based on how that engine was used. There's an extremely valid reason why relating to air speed. It's not the texture of a port that maximizes the effect of fuel atomization, but the velocity of the air running through an x or y sized valve. The driving factor in this is the piston speed. I'm not going to give you the technical information, but will refer you to information about the Lovell factor. There's a better description of this in the links below, and even a calculator to help you find your engine's sweet spot. Why the Lovell factor is important: https://www.highpowermedia.com/blog/3346/the-effect-of-valve-size Lovell gas factor calculator: http://www.rbracing-rsr.com/lovellgascalc.html Only people who have flow testing equipment know for sure what really works and have the capability to produce a perfectly-matched port job for the ultimate performance build. Those guys know the definition of ultimate, and THEY are floating below the water Aegis-class submarines ready to blow your comment up if you don't know what you're talking about. They don't care if you're an armchair mechanic or a herd of pirates. I will say, they're zoomed in pretty close on me right now, and I'm expecting to take a few hits. My work will be tested based on Dyno and drag strip performance, and the results will be posted here. Fortunately, those kinds of videos are a WHOLE LOT EASIER TO MAKE!!!





How To Recharge an AC System - EricTheCarGuy
Visit me at: http://www.ericthecarguy.com/ Finding leaks video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=95RdGLFIbL8 Basics of AC: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w17DpGCcRj8 AC Performance Test: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XU_A4wNuHXI AC pressures: http://www.aircondition.com/tech/questions/82/ AC pressures 2: http://www.idqusa.com/faqs.php?faq=74&faq_id=74&category_id=18 As I said in the video you need to be responsible when dealing with refrigerant, also in some locations it's not legal for you to perform your own AC work so keep that in mind and observe your local laws. --- Click below and Stay Dirty Visit me at EricTheCarGuy.com http://ericthecarguy.com/ Visit EricTheCarGuy Forum http://www.ericthecarguy.com/forum/default.aspx Visit my Facebook Page: http://www.facebook.com/EricTheCarGuy --- Stay dirty ETCG Due to factors beyond the control of EricTheCarGuy, it cannot guarantee against unauthorized modifications of this information, or improper use of this information.  EricTheCarGuy assumes no liability for property damage or injury incurred as a result of any of the information contained in this video. EricTheCarGuy recommends safe practices when working with power tools, automotive lifts, lifting tools, jack stands, electrical equipment, blunt instruments, chemicals, lubricants, or any other tools or equipment seen or implied in this video.  Due to factors beyond the control of EricTheCarGuy, no information contained in this video shall create any express or implied warranty or guarantee of any particular result.  Any injury, damage or loss that may result from improper use of these tools, equipment, or the information contained in this video is the sole responsibility of the user and not EricTheCarGuy.





Cylinder Head 106 - Casting & Porting Tech
Description. No really guys, what can I type here? I just went on for 18 minutes without shutting up. I apologize for deviating from my normal format, but we're almost there... ...when I port a head, there will be no voiceover, and it will be a 200-series video.





4g63 Balance Shaft Elimination - bearing modification
This is the first part of a two part series about balance shaft elimination on 4g series engines. This video details the bearings, the other video will cover the front case modifications. I've already got a low-def video of the front case mods, and I plan to re-shoot that one in HD when I'm in the assembly phase. It's linked in the video. The balance shafts are designed to cancel out harmonic vibrations caused by combustion and the spinning rotating assembly. They may offer a greater degree of comfort to the driver and passengers, but with that comfort comes a price. Often, when a 4g63 timing belt gives up, it's because the balance shaft belt breaks or comes loose and takes the timing belt out with it. When that happens, it can total your pistons, valves, damage the crankshaft, wrist pins, timing belt tensioner and crank angle sensor. Basically, it can total your motor. The balance shafts also have a combined weigh over 10 lbs and both are driven off the timing belt making them additional and heavy rotating mass. If you've got a lightweight flywheel but still have balance shafts, you have your priorities mixed up. So here's what you do with the bearings. It's easy. You can do this at home. You CAN do it with the motor in the car, BUT DON'T. You must enjoy punishment to do this like that. The end result will slightly increase your oil pressure, but usually not enough to cause concern unless you have a full-circumference bearing turbo, ball bearing turbo--with your oil feed coming off the oil filter housing. The head feed would be better in that case because it's regulated at 15 PSI.





CAT Engine Teardown TimeLapse
This CAT diesel engine had a million miles on it and was in perfect condition upon inspection. Sindall Transportation in New Holland, PA did the disassembly.





Marios Eclipse GSX 400HP ST2 project
HEY HOWS IT GOING, IV BEEN BUILDING THIS CAR OVER THE LAST YEAR AND AM PLANNING TO RACE IT NEXT SEASON IN THE NASA ST2 CLASS. I USED TO HAVE MY PRO LICENSE ROADRACING STREETBIKES BUT BROKE MY NECK A LITTLE OVER 5 YEARS AGO NOW SO IM NOW A C5-C6 QUADRIPLEGIC. SO I BASICALLY JUST PREMATURELY GRADUATED FROM 2 WHEELS TO 4... LOL THE CAR SHOULD BE PRETTY FUN ONCE I GET A NEW TRANNY FOR IT IT WILL DO PRETTY WELL I THINK. ILL POST MORE THROUGH OUT THE SEASON. CHECK OUT MY BLOG AT KEEPEMSPINNINRACING.BLOGSPOT.COM THANKS FOR WATCHING AND GOD BLESS.





JMS Racing - 906hp Evo - Forced Performance T3 HTA3794
Follow us on facebook! http://www.facebook.com/pages/JMS-Racing/168686186475891?ref=ts&fref=ts 210-310-1729 JMSTuning@gmail.com JMSRacing.net





Cylinder Head 102 - Hydro Test Valves
If you noticed a drop in compression on one cylinder, and pouring a cap of oil through the spark plug holes didn't fix it, then it's likely you experienced a leaky valve or a burnt valve seat. What this test does is show you where it was leaking. Typically it takes a valve job to repair, but this can also occur on a freshly-machined head if any work was done improperly or out-of-center. I'm using tap water for the test because both cylinder heads I'm testing will receive extensive machine work and cleaning before being re-used. If you were to do this test on a freshly-machined head, you'd want to use deionized water as it contains none of the salts (sodium, chlorine, etc...) that would leave deposits and corrode metal parts.





► Bentley Factory - W12 Engine





Jafro's GSX Build Parts - 1gina2g
Some advice and expectations about the parts acquisition process. Cars only get built in a week on TV. And still then you have to take their word for it. The ones that actually do it have a 20 man full-time crew, and therefore; they have no excuse for not having it done yet. We don't have that. Stuff takes time. I'm not building a car to sell it. There's a whole lot of parts in this video. Whole lot of parts. Rather than spend a ton of space babbling incessantly, this is what you came here for. Part numbers. Meat. This isn't an all-inclusive list of parts for a rebuild. It's what YouTube let me fit. I hope you find what you needed. If not, hang tight. Help is on the way. Shoutout to Sirnixalot in the Cayman Islands for this thread about valvetrain part weights: http://www.dsmtuners.com/forums/cylinder-head-short-block/393646-evo3-evo8- valvetrain-weight-comparison-inside.html 6-bolt fasteners: MF140202 - Bolt, Engine RR Plate Flange M6 x 10 (2qty) MD012109 - Bolt, Engine RR Plate Washer Assembled 6 x 16 (2qty) MF140202 - Bolt, Timing Belt Cover Flange M6 x 10 (4qty) MD167134 - Bolt, Engine Oil Pan (2qty) Flange M6 x 8 MD097012 - Bolt, Engine Oil Pan (17qty) Flange M6x10 MD131417 - Bolt, Timing Belt Cover Flange M6x16 MD040557 - Bolt, Flywheel (6qty) M12x22.5 MS401451 - Stud, M10 x 28 Cylinder Block MD065945 - Plug, Cylinder Block Screw (balance shaft) MS240211 - Bolt, Crankshaft Pulley Washer Assembled M8x25 (4qty) MD129350 - Bolt, Timing Belt Tensioner (2qty) M8x51 MD129354 - Bolt, Timing Belt Train M10x33 Happy Face Bolt MF140062 - Bolt, Engine Front Case M10x30 MF140225 - Bolt, Engine Front Case M8x20 (4qty) MF140227 - Bolt, Engine Front Case M8x25 MF140233 - Bolt, Engine Front Case M8x40 MF241266 - Bolt, Oil Filter Washer Assembled M8x65 MF241261 - Bolt, Oil Filter Washer Assembled M8x40 (2qty) MF241268 - Bolt, Oil Filter Washer Assembled M8x75 MF241264 - Bolt, Washer Assembled M8x55 MF140021 - Bolt, Cooling Water Line Flange M8x12 MF241256 - Bolt, M/T Clutch Slave Cylinder Washer Assembled M8x28 MD718549 - Bolt, Transfer Case Washer Assembled M12x130 (3qty) MF241319 - Bolt, Transfer Case Washer Assembled M12x70 (4qty) MD706012 - Bolt, T/M Connecting Flange M8x60 MD108474 - Bolt, Starter Flange M10x65 (2qty) MF140266 - Bolt, T/M Connecting Flange M10x40 (2qty) MD740892 - Bolt, T/M Connecting Flange M10x43.5 MF140471 - Bolt, T/M Connecting Flange M10x65 MD706012 - Bolt, T/M Connecting Flange M8x60 MF140021 - Bolt, T/M Connecting Flange M8x12 6-bolt Rear Main Seal Housing: MF140205 - Bolt, Cylinder Block Flange M6 x 16 (5qty) Rear Oil Seal Case MD040330 - Case, Crankshaft Rear Oil Seal MD040332 - Oil Separator Crakshaft rear oil seal MF472403 - Pin Cylinder Block Dowel 6x14mm (2qty) MD183243 - Gasket, Rear Oil Seal Case 7-bolt Rear Main Seal Case MD172170* * oil separator ring only required on 6-bolt cars, same oil seal, different gasket. Throttle Body Gasket: 8903.1-9006.1 MD125822 1g 9006.2-9207.3 MD146399 1g (AC60-653) 9208.1-9405.1 MD194578 1g 9401.1-9907.2 MD180360 all 2g cars (MD1) Intake Elbow Gasket: 8903.1-9207.3 MD340327 1g 9208.1-9405.1 MD194827 1g 9401.1-9907.2 MD302262 all 2g cars MD307343 - OE Valve Stem Seals (16qty) MD087060 - OE Fuel Injector Insulator (4qty) MD614813 - OE Fuel Injector O-Ring (4qty) MD181032 - Gasket, Exhaust Manifold 1g/2g (standard) MD188995 - Gasket, 1g Intake Manifold MD192031 - Gasket, 2g Intake Manifold MD183808 - Gasket, Standard Composite Head Gasket 89-99 MD069879 - 1g Sensor Coolant Gauge Unit MD177572 - 2g Sensor Coolant Gauge Unit MD310606 - 1g/2g alternator belt 985mm MD186124 - 1g/2g alternator belt 980mm MD186784 - 1g/2g Valve Cover Gasket MD186785 - 1g/2g Spark Plug Well Gaskets (4qty) MN119896 - 1g tensioner arm MD170402 - 2g tensioner arm MD997608 - 1g thermostat kit MD315301 - 2g Thermostat Kit MD141510 - 1g Knock Sensor MD300670 - 2g Knock Sensor MD133273 - 1g/2g Oil Pressure Gauge Sensor MD091056 - 1g/2g Coolant Temperature Switch MD095656 - 6 bolt clutch cover plate MD191171 - 7 bolt clutch cover plate MD178430 - 1g Power Steering Belt MD310617 - 2g Power Steering Belt MD311638 - Oil filter cap gasket MD343564 - Oil Seal, Crankshaft Rear MD030764 - O-ring, Cooling Water Pipe 33.4mm MD375091 - EVO 8 Rocker Arm




Which car is faster? Which Car is Faster?





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