Drag Racing 1/4 Mile times 0-60 Dyno Fast Cars Muscle Cars

CRANKWALKED? 7-bolt teardown 1080HD

Now this is a story all about how My bearings got flipped-turned upside down And I'd like to take a minute just sit right there And tell you how I used to mix and burn my gas and my air. In RVA suburbs born and raised On the dragstrip is where I spent most of my days Chillin out, maxin, relaxing all cool, 'n all shooting some BS outside with my tools When a couple of guys who were up to no good Started running races in my neighborhood I heard one little knock and my rods got scared And said "You put it in the garage until you figure out where..." I Begged and pleaded that it not be that way, But it didn't want to start and run another day. I kissed it goodbye, because the motor punched its ticket I got out my camera, said "I might as well kick it." Crankwalk yo this is bad Drinking metal shavings from an oil pan. Is this what the rumor of crankwalk is like? Hmm this won't be alright But wait I heard knocking, grinding and all that Is this the type of failure that should happen to this cool cat? I don't think so, I'll see when I get there I hope they're prepared for this video I share. Well I pulled all the bolts and when I came out There were chunks in my fluids in the pan and they drained out I aint all depressed cause I seen this before. I got my books and my wrench and we'll do it once more. I sprang into action like lightning disassembled I whistled while I worked and my hands never trembled If anything you could say that this bling is rare, and when I saw what broke I stained my underwear. I turned off the air compressor 'bout 7 or 8 And I yelled to crankcase "Yo holmes, smell ya later" I looked at my internals they were finally there To sit on my workbench and stink up the air. Audio track by RojoDelChocolate. Here's the 48,000 mile-old 7-bolt I blew up summer 2011 after over 150 drag passes, a half dozen Dyno sessions, 4 transmissions, 3 clutches and 10 years of hard all-weather use.


 


More Videos...


7-Bolt Shortblock Failure - Full Diagnosis
If you are your own mechanic, there is no more important character trait worthy of development than the ability to own your mistakes. That's where the line is drawn between good mechanics and bad mechanics. It's not the failures but how they deal with them that measures their ability. In short, it's not easy to admit you did something wrong or were negligent. But if you don't own it and talk about it, it doesn't get fixed, and nothing positive can come from it. It was my quest to overcome my clutch issue that lead to the creation of a video. That video is the textbook perfect guide for how to correctly install a DSM transmission. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6bE_9sWtnSY&list=PL4B97C16D423317DD Crankwalk as described is caused by a casting defect. This was not a defect. This was preventable. A lot of people would find something like this and not tell anyone out of embarrassment. I'm not ashamed. It's my fault. I got good use out of this engine and it was tough enough to make it 48K miles since the last rebuild despite my abuse. I'm here to tell you if you bought a used car that's had its clutch replaced, or if you ever pay someone else to do it... make sure it has this bolt. It's stashed away between the starter and the transfer case, so it's hard to see. Make sure all of your bell housing bolts are torqued properly because fastener problems can destroy your shortblock, clutch and transmission. If your car fails because of a mis-aligned transmission, you have no reason to blame crankwalk. It wasn't until I bought my next AWD car that I discovered there was a smaller bolt on the other side of the block. I destroyed 3 transmissions in the GSX first. With the damage already done to my crankshaft, I then lost a shortblock. It's an ounce of prevention that's worth metric tons on your bank account. Grade 10 M8x60 bell housing bolt = MD706012. It gets 22-25'lbs of torque. Owning my mistake permits me to learn from it through con$equence$, and never repeat it. What good would it have done anyone else for me to learn this lesson and not share it? That's why I'm providing this video to all of you. Sharing it can perhaps help someone else avoid this costly mistake. This is the final chapter for my 7-bolt, and this book is going back on the shelf. Here are some valuable resources if you're trying to read bearing damage: http://www.enginebuildermag.com/Article/5150/csi_engine_bearings_when_good_ bearings_go_bad.aspx http://catalog.mahleclevite.com/bearing/ http://www.studebaker-info.org/tech/Bearings/CL77-3-402.pdf And of course, now that I've covered the complete oil system, transmission and driveshaft series of videos, you now have all the tools necessary to ensure your 4g63 lasts a very long time. Whether the casting defect exists?... or it's all caused by a bolt, or the harmonics, or whatever... Sure, crankwalk exists and it's horrible. But with the small amount of movement required for your crankshaft before it contacts the block isn't far enough to make your clutch drop to the floor when you turn. You'd be hearing woodpeckers and jackhammers on the crank long before that clutch pedal would fall to the floor. Some people are going to hate on me for saying that. That's fine. I believe all of the people who experienced the clutch pedal issues had fastener problems on their bell housing. DSMs get a bad reputation for this but we can change that. Crankwalk is never the cause of your engine failure. Crankwalk is always a symptom of the real problem. It's your disease that makes you deny it's your fault. You've got the 'itis. DSM-itis. Whenever you dig deeper, you'll discover what applied all of those thrust loads to your crankshaft to begin with, and it's not going to be a casting defect that moves your crank .101". Mine only went .014", but all of the same parts failed. PLEASE tell me in the comments if you find this bolt is missing from your car.





Crankshaft Refurbishing
Many of you have seen this one before. I apologize if bringing it back offends anyone. Domestickilla gave me a crankshaft, and it's a nice one that I want to clean up and use again. You'll be seeing a lot of it and because of this, this video deserves to be here. I fixed what I broke, and this was my experience. In this video Ballos Precision Machine demonstrates magnetic dye penetrant testing, crankshaft polishing and inspecting the balance of a "butchered" 4g63 6-bolt crankshaft.





Cylinder Head 204 - Porting & Polishing
This is a first-generation 1992 1.6L Hyundai Elantra small-combustion-chamber head. Thats what it is. It's a J1 engine's cylinder head. In Cylinder Head 106 I talked about the mainstream porting theories as they are discussed. We looked at a cylinder head that I have thousands of dollars of professional work performed on, and a bone-stock second-generation head that I didn't port. In this video I just might do something you haven't seen done before. For some, that may be uncomfortable. The port and polish job I perform here is what I think will work best for my current build. This is not an extreme killer port job. What will be different here is where port textures are concerned, I will be following the advice of a reputable source that will remain un-named. You're free to port yours differently than I do in this video, and I give you that out, around the 20 minute marker. The Hyundai is far from being an ultimate-performance build. It's a $400 box of scraps with nothing but time invested. It's perfect for this video. My finished product WILL be an improvement over what I had. I don't yet have access to a flow bench. I still have an achievement to un-lock. As far as you should be concerned with the techniques I employ... without flow numbers there is no evidence of what this will do, but we will gather lots of info from dynp sessions and drag strip time slips. If I could test it on a flow bench, I would. There are MANY, and when I say many, I mean thousands of flame war mongering pirates floating around on rough seas with a hair trigger cannon finger itching to fire if you port a head any differently than what the herd mentality says to do while porting a cylinder head. I cover the herd mentality because it has merit. It's been tested. Tried and true. But I don't follow it to the letter of the law. I'm definitely not here to de-bunk it. I would port a cylinder head differently for each build based on how that engine was used. There's an extremely valid reason why relating to air speed. It's not the texture of a port that maximizes the effect of fuel atomization, but the velocity of the air running through an x or y sized valve. The driving factor in this is the piston speed. I'm not going to give you the technical information, but will refer you to information about the Lovell factor. There's a better description of this in the links below, and even a calculator to help you find your engine's sweet spot. Why the Lovell factor is important: https://www.highpowermedia.com/blog/3346/the-effect-of-valve-size Lovell gas factor calculator: http://www.rbracing-rsr.com/lovellgascalc.html Only people who have flow testing equipment know for sure what really works and have the capability to produce a perfectly-matched port job for the ultimate performance build. Those guys know the definition of ultimate, and THEY are floating below the water Aegis-class submarines ready to blow your comment up if you don't know what you're talking about. They don't care if you're an armchair mechanic or a herd of pirates. I will say, they're zoomed in pretty close on me right now, and I'm expecting to take a few hits. My work will be tested based on Dyno and drag strip performance, and the results will be posted here. Fortunately, those kinds of videos are a WHOLE LOT EASIER TO MAKE!!!





Why so SIRIUS? Kia 4g64?
This video assumes you're aware that various iterations of the 4g series Mitsubishi engines are designated as Sirius I & II. For detailed information about which engines qualify as which, visit: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mitsubishi_Sirius_engine There's also this at EvolutionM: http://forums.evolutionm.net/evo-engine-turbo-drivetrain/278462-official-hyundai-2-4l-g4js -4g64-thread.html Good luck finding info about this using Hyundai and Kia in searches. Wikipedia doesn't have any info about it grouped with the Sonatas either. There is no question what this is, well illustrated in this video. I apologize for the length of this video, but a lot of ground is covered in a short time. Hopefully there's some information in here you may someday use. I'm just trying to expose it because there doesn't seem to be any real information floating around in the forums about this yet. The car is a first-generation 1999-2005 Kia Optima sedan. It has the EVO equivalent of a 4g64 2.4L. Before using any of these parts, do your research, cross-reference your parts and know what you're getting into. Using parts from this rotating assembly in a 2g Eclipse will require aftermarket rods and/or custom pistons. This is information for those who wish to frankenstein their builds, or save a buck... whichever.... either one of those requires skill.





Calculate Your Compression Ratio
This is everything you need to do to calculate your compression ratio. No foolin'. Every equation and process demonstrated. Find all your variables. Know your exact compression ratio in every cylinder. This is how you do it. Just because your service manual says your car is 7.8:1 or 8.5:1 compression doesn't mean that it is. Whenever there are casting irregularities, variations in piston height, parts that have been machined, non-OE parts, or changes to your head gasket selection, your compression ratio WILL change. It's highly probable that you're only CLOSE to spec if you've never touched your engine at all since it was "born", and that it doesn't MATCH spec. Even if it did, how would you know? This. 5 variables. V1 Swept Volume V2 Deck Volume V3 Piston-to-deck clearance V4 Piston dish cc's V5 Head combustion chamber cc's The ratio math: V1+V2+V3+V4+V5 = volume of combustion chamber at BDC V2+V3+V4+V5 = volume of combustion chamber at TDC The ratio is... (V1+V2+V3+V4+V5) ÷ (V2+V3+V4+V5) : (V2+V3+V4+V5) ÷ (V2+V3+V4+V5) or BDC ÷ TDC : TDC ÷ TDC First you fill in the variables, then you calculate volumes, then you add the volumes, then you reduce the ratio (fraction). It's that easy. Here are your magic numbers: 0.7854 = Pi quartered to the ten thousandth 16.387 = number of cc's in a cubic inch. If you divide any number in cc's by 16.387 it gives you inches. If you multiply any number in cubic inches by 16.387 it gives you cc's. Quartering pi lets you use the calculation: BORE x BORE x STROKE x .7854 = volume of a cylinder instead of... π x (BORE ÷ 2) x (BORE ÷ 2) x STROKE = volume of a cylinder Either way is right. You get the same result if you calculate pi to the ten thousandth. While I apologize for all the math, no I don't. I'm really not sorry. You actually clicked here for it whether you realize it or not. This is ALL the math, the tests, and the whole process to calculate your cylinder volumes and compression individually even if you don't know any of your variables yet. All of my numbers are present for those who want to calculate out the last 3 cylinders out of curiosity just to see how it affects cylinder volumes and compression ratios from one cylinder to the next. Why would I do that for you? Why would I deprive you of that practice? Just assume that all 4 of my combustion chambers are 41.75 ml if you do this. Clicking like share and subscribe helps a channel grow. It also motivates me. Don't sweat the camera. It's enough to know that so many of you care about what I'm doing here. From the bottom of my atmospheric dump, I thank you all! This gift horse's teeth are all over the place, but he sometimes poops gold nuggets. PS: Use ATF for your piston dish volume tests, not alcohol. Of course it's better just to use the spec sheet included with your pistons... but not everyone gets that luxury. Water is just fine for head combustion chamber tests. Dry and re-oil all parts that water touches.





Turbo Elantra Bearing Failure Diagnosis
I had time to look at this thing up close. Go through the oil system, and check out all the bearings. Looks like another good study for my oil system series because it's the opposite problem that my GSX experienced. High oil pressure can be remedied a number of ways, but left unchecked can actually take a toll on your bearings. The way your engine bearings work, the parts they suspend are supported only by an oil film layer, and flow needs to be right in order for it to work as an actual bearing. If the oil supply is insufficient, then it loses the ability to suspend the part causing it to crash into the bearing surface. If oil flow is too great, friction is increased, the flow becomes turbulent, and the oil film doesn't form properly. High oil pressure can float and spin rod bearings, and that's worst-case scenario. I had several un-favorable conditions going on inside this engine and that makes it a little bit difficult to link what my engine experienced to any one singular thing. I think it's easier to look at it like some sort of perfect storm. From sub-standard parts for how the engine components would be used, to oil pressure, to part fatigue, to part history to abuse... this thing's got a little bit of everything working against it and that's why it's such a hilarious car. It was given to me with one condition. "See what this thing will do, and see how long it goes before it breaks." My take on it is, the parts are still less than ideal, and they've still got life left in them. It's worth fixing. These parts are worthless as a race motor, and normally I'd have junked 'em, but it's the Hyundai.





Block Preparation Part 1
Preparation for powder coating and Glyptal application. Audio track is an original performance by Rojo Del Chocolate. My block is being powder coated rather than painted. It's just something I do. The GSX had it on the last block so it's getting it again. Since the tools are so similar and the mess is the same, I'm going ahead and preparing it for the Glyptal application as well. These 2 coatings will require being baked separately. The powder coating is baked on at a hotter temperature than the Glyptal, so it's going first. The surface preparation instructions for Glyptal is as follows: Surface to be painted should be dry and free from dirt, wax, grease, rust and oil. Remove all grease and oil by washing surface with mineral spirits. Wipe or scrape off all loose dirt, rust or scale. The last sentence is what's covered in this video. The 2nd sentence happens next (although it's already degreased), and I'll get it back from powder coat with it in the state described in sentence #1 completed. If following these instructions to the letter of the law. Second and third opinions in... the main journal is fine. You'll notice that I didn't coat the main caps, or "suitcase handles". I'm not going to. You bang around on these installing and removing them, and I don't want to risk chipping them once they're coated. They're below the windage area, and there will also be an un-coated main bearing girdle down there. This video covered 25 hours of actual work. Yes, I kept changing into the same filthy clothes every shoot because I wanted it to look consistent. You have to take your time doing this kind of work, and be VERY VERY CAREFUL! If for some reason you're crazy enough to attempt what I do in this video, you do so at your own risk. This is an elective treatment that I've never done, but I am by no means the first person to do it. I'm learning about it just like the rest of you.





► Bentley Factory - W12 Engine





Boost Leak Testing 202: Hair Spray 1080HD
Why do I know about this? I'm tired of being the one knowing all the weird crap. If everyone knows it, it won't be weird anymore. It will be commonplace. By the time I'm done sealing up all of my own Boost leaks, all of you will also be experts as well. I'm sure most of you would teach me something, too... but you subscribed, so here it comes... something I learned in my travels... Also, thanks Ilya M. I've only heard about it twice in my life. It worked great for the one time I've ever needed it, and I'm a huge fan.





Cylinder Head 203 - Valve & Spring Installation
There are 2 critical values in getting your valvetrain geometry correct. Valve install height and spring install height. On some models of cylinder heads, getting these values is easier than it is on a 4g63 cylinder head. On the first Glyptal video, you heard me complain about the complexity of the casting and how hard it was to reach all the nooks and crannies while applying that coating. The casting is very complex on a 4g63 head. There are hydraulic galleries for the lifters elevated above the valvetrain surface which make accessing each valve bore with precision measurement tools very difficult. It's because of this that you need to do some math to get these values correct. Stuart is going to show you the process for obtaining the stem height and spring height values on a 4g63 head. Using these numbers you can determine other work necessary to correct the spring height value to correct seat pressure, and ensure you have adequate valve travel for your springs to work correctly. It looks like rocket surgery, but really it's pretty simple. The ultimate goal is to get every valve spring in as close proximity to one another as you can, while doing your best to nail the recommended specification PROVIDED BY THE VALVE SPRING MANUFACTURER. Loose valve springs can result in leaky valve seats, valve bounce and deflection that will drastically shorten the life of the valvetrain. If valve bounce is severe, it can cause engine-killing interference with the pistons Tight valve springs can cause excessive valvetrain vibration generated by the force necessary for the camshafts to push them open. On the narrow side of the spectrum this can increase friction on the cams which can wipe lobes and shorten their lifespan, and on the severe end in not only increases the likelihood of wiping a cam lobe, it can lead to binding valve springs and crashing the valvetrain. You have to hit the sweet spot. Valve springs specifications include several variables that help you achieve these goals. The manufacturer rates their springs for their installed pressure and height. They have a compression limit referred to as valve spring bind which tells you how far you can compress them from their installed height before the coils begin to bind and the spring stops compressing. The valve springs used in this video are rated at 97lbs @ 1.440" installed, and .500" lift. This means they should bind at .940", but my cams will only generate .433" lift, giving me plenty of head room at the top (.067") to prevent binding if they are installed correctly. One thing we found which I wasn't expecting is they're a little on the stiff side of spec. We measured 100lbs at 1.452", so rather than risk setting them up too tight, that's where we set our tight specification. This decision was made because if the rated pressure is lower than our actual measurements, this would in theory decrease the lift specification and increase the possibility of binding. Our install pressure ended up still higher than spec with a barely-larger-than-spec spring installed height. I don't consider this a defect. It is close enough within the margin of error that it shouldn't cause any problems, and anyone doing this job right will measure and check all of these specifications to ensure these parts are what they say they are. That's what you watched us do. I'm confident that this will work because the 4g63 utilizes a hydraulic self-adjusting valvetrain. If the stem height is too high, it can be reduced by grinding the ends of the valve stems to shorten them. This will have no affect on spring installed height when the parts are assembled, however; it will change the amount on paper that you'd need to subtract from the stem height in order to accurately calculate spring installed height. If any of the valves have been ground to shorten their stem height, all of the valves should be measured separately with their retainers and keepers assembled, and that new value subtracted from stem height individually to obtain each spring installed height. You can't reduce this value any other way short of replacing the valve seat. If the valve stem height is too low, you can modify the valve seat or machine the valve spring perches (seat or retainer) to increase the size of the spring installed height. Another method would be to cut the valve seat deeper to recess the valve. In my video, we show this whole process on a brand new set of Supertech valves. All of them are identical, and all of the retainers are new and identical. Because of this (and yes we checked it), and because no valves required any grinding, we only needed to use one value in our math for all 16 valves. Hopefully this video clears up the process and covers the options available for making changes if they're necessary. If you land within 3% of spec, you've done your diligence in achieving correct valvetrain geometry.





4g63 Block Oil Gallery Mod
This modification is intended to improve your 4g series engine's oil delivery. People frequently discover large chunks of flash in their engine's main oil gallery. It's because the galleries are part of the cast, they're not machined into the block. There is also a very rough sharp edge where the main oil gallery is bored into the block, and oil must make a slightly greater-than 90° turn in order to begin its course to the parts it lubricates. Both of these conditions cause turbulence in the oil flow. My goal in this video is to eliminate as much of that as I can. This is a cheap and easy modification if you have the tools, and the patience. Any engine with cast-in oil galleries could probably benefit from this. Be careful not to cut into the high pressure oil gallery or else you will circulate un-filtered oil to the #1 main, oil pump, and rear balance shaft. You will also deprive the rest of the engine the oil pressure it needs to operate. So in short, punch a hole in that and it's trash. I did this my way, everyone may choose to do this a different way. I just wanted to make this video to raise awareness. Also, there's a great thread on DSMtuners about this. Pictures and everything. Written by a machinist and friend of the DSM community. Go give him some reps because he's posted a lot of great info about the DSM oil system over the years. http://www.dsmtuners.com/forums/articles-engine-fuel/452546-4g63-block-oili ng-mod.html





CAT Engine Teardown TimeLapse
This CAT diesel engine had a million miles on it and was in perfect condition upon inspection. Sindall Transportation in New Holland, PA did the disassembly.





Marios Eclipse GSX 400HP ST2 project
HEY HOWS IT GOING, IV BEEN BUILDING THIS CAR OVER THE LAST YEAR AND AM PLANNING TO RACE IT NEXT SEASON IN THE NASA ST2 CLASS. I USED TO HAVE MY PRO LICENSE ROADRACING STREETBIKES BUT BROKE MY NECK A LITTLE OVER 5 YEARS AGO NOW SO IM NOW A C5-C6 QUADRIPLEGIC. SO I BASICALLY JUST PREMATURELY GRADUATED FROM 2 WHEELS TO 4... LOL THE CAR SHOULD BE PRETTY FUN ONCE I GET A NEW TRANNY FOR IT IT WILL DO PRETTY WELL I THINK. ILL POST MORE THROUGH OUT THE SEASON. CHECK OUT MY BLOG AT KEEPEMSPINNINRACING.BLOGSPOT.COM THANKS FOR WATCHING AND GOD BLESS.





JMS Racing - 906hp Evo - Forced Performance T3 HTA3794
Follow us on facebook! http://www.facebook.com/pages/JMS-Racing/168686186475891?ref=ts&fref=ts 210-310-1729 JMSTuning@gmail.com JMSRacing.net





Grinding Oil Return Channels
I started cleaning the rust out, and got carried away. I didn't want to do as extensive of a cleanup job as I did on the GSX, but still wanted to make improvements because of the kinds of oil-related problems it experienced. There's a method to this madness. It will make more sense once I get around to bolting the oil pan back on. The techniques in this video are things I had to do right now if I was going to do them at all. Some of them really needed to be done anyway. You really don't see people do these tricks on imports. Just because you don't see it, it doesn't mean it can't help. I hope you enjoyed the motor oil drag races in the middle of the video. They speak for the science behind this mod... without having to get all scientific. Those results speak clearly for themselves, and there's plenty of chances to get scientific as the Glyptal treatment of the GSX is completed. In this video... I used steel wire cup brushes for both an air DIY grinder, and a Dremel to remove the rust. I used a cone-shaped carbide double-cut burr to smooth the crankcase. I polished the crankcase with coarse and medium sanding rolls for both an air DIY grinder and a Dremel. I used a 1/4" ball carbide double-cut burr to grind the channel. I used a pack of Harbor Freight #95947 10-Piece Tube Brush Kit. http://www.harborfreight.com/10-piece-tube-brush-kit-95947.html





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