Aircraft Emergency And Landing in a Glasair - the impossible turn ???

My Glasair engine is a Subaru SVX EG-33. Six bearings in the planetary speed reduction unit failed during departure. I declared an in-flight emergency and immediately returned for landing. Total flight time was 63 seconds. I failed to plug the camera mike in so you don't hear the engine monitor blaring out alarms or chatter between other pilots and myself. Departure was made with 10 degrees of flaps and remained there until landing with 25 degrees. The buzzer during much of the flight is the "gear up" with "flaps extended" warning horn ... the stall horn never sounded. Speed did drop but the flight never reached critically low speed. Power was intentionally reduced to keep gearbox temps down. I fly patrol flights at 500 ft or less, often 6 to 7 hrs a day. So I do have low level maneuvering experience. Some may call this the impossible turn but power was available during the entire flight.

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Aircraft Accident, Brake Failure - Glasair Crash - Cockpit View Plane Crash
CONTAINS LANGUAGE NOT SUITABLE FOR YOUNGER VIEWERS. The Glasair has no nose wheel steering... only differential braking. Rudder effectiveness degrades rapidly as the aircraft slows below 70 MPH. Full left rudder was applied throughout this incident. The airplanes brake line ruptures and the plane is pulled to the right. I wasted time pumping the left brake thinking their must be air in the line. To avoid a runway light, the right brake was tapped just as we exited the pavement. My plan was to allow the plane to slow in the grass, after passing the culvert I would use the right brake to come to a stop ... the unseen erosion gully modified that plan. This Glasair is powered with a six cylinder 202 cubic inch Subaru SVX Alcyone EG33 engine. We were in route to an air race in Tennessee when this overrun occurred. We won "Silver" in the Sport Air Race League 2011 season.

Glasair 1RG Fly By 260 MPH - Subaru EG33 Motor
Father-In-Law's first flight in a Glasair aircraft powered by a Subaru Alcyone SVX EG33 six cylinder 202 cubic inch engine. He had never before experienced any "G Loads" and handled them well. Watch us make a high speed missed approach.

Slick: A Glasair Demo Flight
Meet Bob Zajko You've met him before. He's done a few guest blog posts on The Anywhere Map including Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3 of his video demo. What you might not have known about Bob is that he owns a Glasair 1 experimental aircraft. It's a retractable gear, controllable pitch propeller, stick-flown aircraft and you can call her "Slick." Hello Slick I met up with Bob at the KFDK airport in Frederick, MD for an afternoon flight in the Glasair. This would be many firsts for me: first time in a Glasair, first time flying with Bob, first time with a full video setup, and first time flying out of FDK. Big day, right? Thanks to our friend Patrick who loaned us his GoPro Hero 2, we were able to employ a 3 camera setup in flight. Coupled with an audio patch cable for recording intercom and air traffic control, we hit the skies. Being my first demo flight video you can see it was a bit lacking in flight maneuvers. We hadn't exactly known what to film and decided to just go up and have some fun while the cameras recorded it all. Of course you have to realize that when it comes to video editing for time and content that sometimes things get left out. For instance, YES we did a runup, all checklists, and radio calls even though not everything can be seen during the video, we did it. Avoiding Camp David KFDK is about 11 nautical miles south of Camp David, also known as Prohibited Area 40, or P-40. Luckily we weren't going to be flying around there on this demo flight. Instead, we headed westerly out to the common practice area. There Bob handed the controls over to me and I flew some basic turns, climbs, and descents. Admiring the ease of controllability I decided I would try my hand at some steep turns. We started off at 5,000 ft for this maneuver as I banked 45-degress into a left hand turn. The aircraft didn't require much back pressure or trim input to maintain level flight, even at our bank angle. Upon completion of my left-hand steep turn I rolled into a turn towards to right, again holding her at 45-degrees of bank with minimal control inputs. Not thinking that we should demonstrate any other flight characteristics like stalls or slow flight, we went for a short sight seeing tour of historic Harpers Ferry, WV. I've been to Harpers Ferry 2 times prior but it was from the ground. This was the first time I had flown over this neat town. The sun was shining and the fall tree colors were in full effect making for a nice backdrop as I maneuvered around the area before returning to Frederick for a full-stop landing. In Closing You'll learn all kinds of performance data about the Glasair during our flight to and from the practice area as Bob answers my questions about that capabilities of his airplane. His knowledge of this airplane is pretty in-depth, something I would come to expect form a person who has over 1,000 hours flight time in Glasairs. If you've enjoyed this demo video, share it on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, or leave a comment below. I'm also available to film demonstration videos for fun or for hire. If you'd like to have your aircraft featured on ThePilotReport please Contact Me - Two-thirds of this video was recorded using my favorite GoPro Hero video camera. For more details about the versatility of GoPro cameras, visit my affiliate link:

Emergency Landing at John Day, OR in a Glasair
Lots of narrative, fewer pictures (I was a little at the time). Hope you find this instructive. On a flight from Richland, WA to Salt Lake City, I smelled smoke in the cockpit and saw a very high reading on the oil pressure gauge. Made an idle-power landing from 15,000 feet to an airport 15 miles away and met the local fire fighters at John Day, OR. Good people!