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US Navy HIGH SPEED sea trial of USS Milwaukee LCS 5 ship
US Navy begins high speed sea trials of the USS Milwaukee LCS 5 ship. The Freedom class is one of two classes of littoral combat ship built for the United States Navy.[12] The Freedom class was proposed by Lockheed Martin as a contender for USN plans to build a fleet of small, multipurpose warships to operate in the littoral zone. Two ships were approved, to compete with the Independence-class design offered by General Dynamics and Austal for a construction contract of up to 55 vessels. Despite initial plans to only accept two of the Freedom and Independence variants, the Navy has since announced plans to order up to ten additional ships of each class, for a total 12 ships per class.[13] As of 2015, two ships are active and an additional five are under construction. Planning and construction Planning for a class of small, multipurpose warships to operate in the littoral zone began in the early 2000s. The construction contract was awarded to Lockheed Martin's LCS team (Lockheed Martin, Gibbs & Cox, Marinette Marine, Bollinger Shipyards) in May 2004 for two vessels. These would then be compared to two ships built by Austal USA to determine which design would be taken up by the Navy for a production run of up to 55 ships. On 15 April 2003, the Lockheed Martin LCS team unveiled their Sea Blade concept based on the hull form of the motor yacht Destriero.[14][15] The keel of the lead ship USS Freedom was laid down in June 2005, by Marinette Marine in Marinette, Wisconsin.[16] She was christened in September 2006,[17][18] delivered to the Navy in September 2008, and commissioned that November.[19] During INSURV trials, 2,600 discrepancies were discovered, including 21 considered high-priority.[20] Not all of these were rectified before the ship entered service, as moving the ship away from Milwaukee before the winter freeze was considered a higher priority.[21] Cost overruns during Freedom‍ '​s construction combined with projected future overruns led the government to issue a "Stop-work" in January 2007 and ultimately led to the cancellation of construction of LCS-3 (the second Lockheed Martin ship) on April 13, 2007.[22] This ship was later re-ordered. After much inconsistency on how testing and orders were to proceed, in November 2010, the USN asked that Congress approve ten of both the Freedom and Independence variants.[23][24][25] Design[edit] An MH-60 Seahawk helicopter approaching USS Freedom in 2009 The ship is a semi-planing steel monohull with an aluminum superstructure. It is 377 feet (115 m) in length, displaces 3,500 metric tons, and can go faster than 45 knots (83 km/h; 52 mph). The design incorporates a large reconfigurable seaframe to allow rapidly interchangeable mission modules, a flight deck with integrated helicopter launch, recovery and handling system and the capability to launch and recover boats (manned and unmanned) from both the stern and side. The flight deck is 1.5 times the size of that of a standard surface ship, and uses a Trigon traversing system to move helicopters in and out of the hangar. The ship has two ways to launch and recover various mission packages: a stern ramp and a starboard side door near the waterline. The mission module bay has a 3-axis crane for positioning modules or cargo.[26] Problems with the electrical systems are the most serious problems with the Freedom class.[27] The fore deck has a modular weapons zone which can be used for a 57 mm gun turret or missile launcher. A Rolling Airframe Missile launcher is mounted above the hangar for short-range defense against aircraft and cruise missiles, and .50-caliber gun mounts are provided topside. The Fleet-class unmanned surface vessel is designed for operations from Freedom variant ships.[28] The core crew will be 40 sailors, usually joined by a mission package crew and an aviation detachment for a total crew of about 75. Automation allows a reduced crew, which greatly reduces operating costs, but workload can still be "gruelling".[29] During testing of the class lead, two ship's companies will rotate on four-month assignments.[30] Four 750-kilowatt Fincantieri Isotta-Fraschini diesel generators provide 3 megawatts of electrical power to power the ship systems.[31] The Congressional Budget Office estimates that fuel will account for only "8 percent to 18 percent" of the total life-cycle costs for Freedom.[32] Senator Jeff Sessions of Alabama has called the report into question and has suggested that Independence, built in his state, would be more fuel efficient and that less frequent refuelings would have an impact on military operations beyond the cost of fuel.[33] In 2012, a Navy cybersecurity team found major deficiencies in Lockheed's Total Ship Computing Environment, which controls the entire ship in order to reduce crewing requirements.[34][35] Survivability has been a criticism of both Littoral Combat Ship classes, rated at level one by the Navy,





Watch combat ship USS Fort Worth during Rough Seas
Heavy Seas Littoral combat ship USS Fort Worth Combat Ship USS Fort Worth LCS 3 transits to South Korea The littoral combat ship USS Fort Worth (LCS 3) transits to South Korea where she will participate in the annual U.S.-Republic of Korea Foal Eagle exercise, the first time an LCS will part in this exercise. Currently on a 16-month rotational deployment in support of the Asia-Pacific re-balance, Fort Worth is a fast and agile warship tailor-made to patrol the region's littorals and work hull-to-hull with partner navies, proving 7th Fleet will the flexible capabilities it needs now and in the future. (U.S. Navy video by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Conor Minto/Released) Astana The Future New World Order City Capital of Kazakhstan #astana #NWO #illuminati https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3rSJsEdUb8E White House Correspondents’ Dinner full show https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jry8mPlFG_0 more RNC Speeches Pastor Mark Burns https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Rwrr8jqdzg RNC Erupts into fighting https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iGM0XgHo8MQ Boos, shouting for 'roll call vote' as convention adopts rules package Milwaukee County Sheriff David Clarke SPEECH https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ca42LhBIQho Melania Trump:RNC SPEECH https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BG0I0BQlwC0 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bhJWYGg2PKk Rudy Giuliani's fiery RNC speech https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n03cAkFQfMo





Cruisers History
In the middle of the 19th century, cruiser came to be a classification for the ships intended for cruising distant waters, commerce raiding, and scouting for the battle fleet. Cruisers came in a wide variety of sizes, from the medium-sized protected cruiser to large armored cruisers that were nearly as big as a pre-dreadnought battleship. With the advent of the dreadnought battleship before World War I, the armored cruiser evolved into a vessel of similar scale known as the battlecruiser. The very large battlecruisers of the World War I era that succeeded armored cruisers were now classified, along with dreadnought battleships, as capital ships. By the early 20th century after World War I, the direct successors to protected cruisers could be placed on a consistent scale of warship size, smaller than a battleship but larger than a destroyer. In 1922, the Washington Naval Treaty placed a formal limit on these cruisers, which were defined as warships of up to 10,000 tons displacement carrying guns no larger than 8 inches in calibre; heavy cruisers had 8 inch guns while those with 6-inch or 5-inch guns were light cruisers, which shaped cruiser design until the end of World War II. Some variations on the Treaty cruiser design included the German Deutschland class "pocket battleships" which had heavier armament at the expense of speed compared to standard heavy cruisers, and the US Alaska class which was a scaled-up heavy cruiser design designated as a "cruiser-killer". In the later 20th century, the obsolescence of the battleship left the cruiser as the largest and most powerful surface combatant after the aircraft carrier. The role of the cruiser varied according to ship and navy, often including air defense and shore bombardment. During the Cold War, the Soviet Navy's cruisers had heavy anti-ship missile armament designed to sink NATO carrier task forces via saturation attack. The U.S. Navy built guided-missile cruisers upon destroyer-style hulls (some called "destroyer leaders" or "frigates" prior to the 1975 reclassification) primarily designed to provide air defense while often adding anti-submarine capabilities, being larger and having longer-range surface-to-air missiles (SAMs) than early Charles F. Adams guided-missile destroyers tasked with the short-range air defense role. By the end of the Cold War, the line between cruisers and destroyers had blurred, with the Ticonderoga class cruiser using the hull of the Spruance class destroyer but receiving the cruiser designation due to their enhanced mission and combat systems. Indeed, the newest U.S. Navy destroyers (for instance the Arleigh Burke class and Zumwalt class) are more heavily-armed than some of the cruisers that they succeeded.





Sinking A Navy Frigate With Missiles And Torpedoes – SINKEX Sinking Exercise
Aerial video of the sinking exercise (SINKEX) of the decommissioned USS Thach (FFG 43) during Rim of the Pacific 2016. The decommissioned ship is fired at with missiles and torpedoes until they sink. The Oliver Hazard Perry-class guided-missile frigate USS Thach was decommissioned after more than 29 years of naval service in year 2013. SINKEX is live fire training exercises conducted by the U.S. Navy to practice gunnery, torpedo accuracy, and missile drills on decommissioned Naval Warships. It gives the U.S. Navy the opportunity to practice on live targets, using real ammunition, and observing the results. AiirSource Military covers events and missions from the United States Armed Forces: Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, and Coast Guard. Visit our channel for more military videos: http://www.youtube.com/AiirSource Like & share this video to show your support! Subscribe to stay updated: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=AiirSource Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/AiirSource Google+: http://www.google.com/+AiirSource Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/AiirSource




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