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Maybach 62--D&M Motorsports Video Test Drive Review 2012 Chris Moran

Maybach 62 Video Test Drive and Review with Chris Moran. Presented by D&M Motorsports. For the exceedingly well-heeled who have decided that only the biggest and best will do, there's the V12-powered Maybach 62 ultraluxury sedan. Resurrecting the nameplate from a line of indulgent, custom-built and mostly chauffeur-driven cars from the 1920s to the '40s, it's one of the most exclusive automobiles in the world. Actually, there are two different Maybach sedans: the 62 and its smaller 57 stablemate. The difference is their length in meters (6.2 and 5.7), with the 62 -- as the longest production sedan currently available -- using its extra length for the benefit of rear-seat passengers. But its size alone is only part of the story, as virtually every conceivable premium luxury is part of the opulent Maybach experience. From world-class leather and wood trim to its multiple lighting schemes and feathered-pillow head restraints, the sumptuous Maybach 62 caters to nearly every reasonable (and even unreasonable) demand. For those wishing to add even more speed to their surroundings, the 62 S model is also available with an absurdly powerful V12. Regardless, the real action is out back where highly adjustable twin seats split by a center console offer lucky passengers not only DVD and CD entertainment but also a refrigerated compartment in which to store the bubbly. With a base price of nearly $400,000 when new, each Maybach 62 is built to order according to its buyer's individual whims from a Maybach "studio" located within select Mercedes dealerships. Though it has few rivals, its obvious primary competition is the Rolls-Royce Phantom. Although each sedan will provide a suitable ultraluxury experience, personal taste will be the deciding factor. If we had to choose, we'd likely go with the Roller due to its unrivalled heritage and more conspicuous styling. Current Maybach 62 The Maybach 62 ultraluxury sedan is offered in two styles: the regular 62 and the higher-performance 62 S. While similar to the Maybach 57, its greater length and interior volume make it more suitable as a chauffeur-driven vehicle. Just about everything is "standard," but there are plenty of opportunities to customize the vehicle with optional features like three-across rear seating, a glass partition and intercom, as well as specific paint colors and interior trim. The S version offers its own unique visual cues like carbon-fiber cabin accents, a restyled grille and dual Exhaust tips. Both Maybach 62 models are powered by variants of the twin-turbocharged V12 Mercedes-Benz uses in its most exclusive vehicles. The regular 62 makes do with a merely prodigious 543 horsepower and 664 pound-feet of torque from its 5.5-liter engine, but the 62 S features an otherworldly 604 hp and 738 lb-ft of torque from a 6.0-liter engine. One of the more notable features inside the 62 is the optional Business Package, which converts this ultraluxury sedan into a rolling executive suite. It includes a dual-port wireless Internet router, Bluetooth capability and a multipurpose rear storage area. A Bluetooth Canon printer integrated into the center console is also offered separately. As the Maybach 62 is intended to have a chauffeur up front, the primary focus is on ride quality -- and the 62, of course, doesn't disappoint. The driving experience itself is much like that of the shorter 57's, with the V12 generating an abundance of thrust and brakes that are capable of effortlessly bringing motion to a halt. Although it wouldn't be our first choice for negotiating tight, congested cityscapes every day, it is shorter than the typical stretched American limousine for those with such a need. Plus, it's a tad nicer than a Town Car. Past Maybach 62 Models The Maybach 62 made a fashionable splash as a debutante back in 2004. It satisfied in most every way, as one might expect of a car costing more than twice as much as the next most expensive Benz-built luxury sedan. The Maybach hasn't changed much through the years, except for 2006 when all models came standard with the Parking Assist System and a new Business Package was offered that turned the 62 into an office on wheels. In 2007, a high-performance 62 S model joined the lineup with its more powerful engine, sport-tuned suspension and unique appointments inside and out.


 


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2010 Campagna T-Rex 14RR--D&M Motorsports Video Test Drive Review 2012 Chris Moran
A two-seat thrill ride...the Campagna T-Rex 14RR. Presented by Chris Moran from AutoMedia. Available at D&M Motorsports. Visit www.dmautosales.com "What is that thing?!" is the most common question you'll get when tearing around town in a T-Rex 1400R. And after spending a solid week in and out of this $52,000 3-wheeled crossbreed, I've come to the conclusion that it is one part car, one part bike, and the answer to your innermost desire for something wildly unconventional. You might recall the early days of the T-Rex's existence—perhaps during its few rap-music video appearances in the 1990s—but since Canadian company Campagna Motors acquired the rights to manufacture it as of September 2008, the T-Rex 1400R looks to hit the street scene again with new improvements and intentions. The 1400 in the T-Rex name, as one would correctly assume, follows the usual motorcycle nomenclature and is indicative of the engine's displacement in cubic centimeters. The 1.4-liter inline-4 is borrowed from a Kawasaki ZX-14 Supersport bike, as is much of the hardware including its sequential gearbox, gauges and ancillary controls. Don't let the diminutive size of this naturally aspirated engine fool you, it cranks out an impressive 197 bhp and 114 lb.-ft. of torque as it screams towards an exospheric redline at 11,500 rpm. The engine's peak torque occurs at 7500 rpm, which delivers a mid-range power punch much like a 2-stroke, but with far greater driveability. The engine is mounted mid-ship between the main body and rear swing arm, favoring weight balance to the front by 6 percent. The purpose built tube-chassis is covered with a fiberglass body that incorporates a roof with an integrated ram-air intake scoop, side ducting to a central radiator and, of course, the T-Rex's somewhat prehistoric-era visage. Ingress/egress is not for the impatient or non-athletic, meaning if you have issues getting into a Lotus Elise, you probably won't be too fond of this thing either. It's best to remove the steering wheel first (as in an open-wheel car) which releases from its hub via an NRG twist-lock connector. The seats and pedal cluster have slide bars with lock pins that make them manually adjustable, but will require you to hop in and out a few times to get them exactly right. Once you're situated and strapped in with the traditional 3-point belt, the engine is brought to life as it would be in a motorcycle—turn the key, flip the ignition switch and push the starter. Start up is surprisingly mellow and neighborhood friendly, as the dual-can Exhausts actually do what they're supposed to. The driving controls are primarily car, meaning there's three pedals, a gear shift, a steering wheel linked to a non-assisted rack and pinion and no need for prior motorcycle experience (or a license for that matter) to operate it. Lane-change signals and horn control is retained on the motorcycle stalks while reverse is the only real oddity, handled with a lever beside your left thigh that mechanically switches the direction the gears spin. On the road, you sit eye-to-bumper with most cars, which is good for stability, but presents a challenge for visibility (a whiptail might make for a nice add-on). At 1130 lb. (fully fueled), the T-Rex has a power-to-weight ratio that provides a rate of acceleration that virtually stops time. This is your single greatest defense against becoming a sitting duck in a sea of treacherous traffic that will either be oblivious to your existence or gravitate uncomfortably close for a better look. The tiny motorcycle side mirrors provide some form of rear view while the roof-mounted mirror provides an excellent view of the ram-air intake tubes. This makes lane changes a precarious affair, and those last-minutes checks for Johnny Law on the open highway are somewhat difficult. When not subjected to the crowded highways, the T-Rex is about as close as you can come to the therapeutic, open-air experience of a motorcycle—less any talent required for balancing on two wheels.





Rolls-Royce Phantom--Video Test Drive with Chris Moran
http://www.SupercarNetwork.com My favorite video so far...a stunning 2009 Rolls-Royce Phantom. Enjoy. Presented by Chris Moran For decades prior to the current-generation Phantom, Rolls-Royces were often perceived as being nothing more than beautiful old-school luxury barges with all the technological innovation and dynamic excitement of the Queen Mary. So to say there was some skepticism surrounding the introduction of the Rolls-Royce Phantom would be like saying reality TV occasionally resorts to fabrication when ratings are at stake. When parent company BMW first announced in the late 1990s that it would be delivering a completely new Rolls-Royce to paying customers on January 1, 2003, most analysts wrote it off as the kind of posturing that typically accompanies a corporate takeover. After all, BMW didn't even own the Rolls-Royce brand yet. It would be four-and-a-half years before the German automaker acquired the rights to sell the storied brand, but the target was indeed met, and the first all-new Rolls-Royce in nearly 40 years left the all-new Rolls-Royce plant at Goodwood in West Sussex, England. Unlike so many of its predecessors, this beautifully crafted and elegant ultraluxury sedan lives up to the lofty expectations of a vehicle adorned with the hood-mounted Spirit of Ecstasy. While a case could be made for one of its few rivals, no other automobile boasts the unique style, grandiose dimensions and sterling reputation of the Rolls-Royce Phantom. Current Rolls-Royce Phantom Despite the ties to BMW, the Phantom is indeed a true Rolls-Royce. At more than 19 feet long, a regular-wheelbase Phantom surpasses a 7 Series by more than 2 feet in total length, and it can completely swallow a Mini between its front and rear axles. Producing a vehicle of such size that doesn't also flex and bend over every road imperfection calls for a unique structure. In the Phantom's case, that structure is an aluminum space frame that is both lighter and stiffer than conventional steel. While the ultraluxury competition may offer more high-tech gizmos and a greater sense of the contemporary, the Rolls-Royce Phantom features an undeniable old-world charm and much-larger-than-life presence. From its majestic hood ornament to its nearly 20-foot expanse, the Phantom commands attention like few other automobiles. And if that isn't sufficient, an extended-wheelbase (EWB) model is available with about 10 additional inches of overall length and rear-seat legroom. The Phantom is powered by a 6.7-liter V12 with 453 horsepower and 531 pound-feet of torque. Power is sent to the rear wheels through a six-speed automatic transmission. In spite of a curb weight approaching 3 tons, going from zero to 60 mph takes just 5.7 seconds. Behind the 20-inch wheels are superbly powerful brakes, an air suspension and automatically adjustable dampers. The inside of the Rolls-Royce Phantom is even nicer than might be imagined, with more leather hides and matching pieces of wood than you'll find on a herd of cattle lost in Sequoia National Forest. Numerous customization options provide ample opportunity to tailor this luxurious environment to one's exact, bespoke specifications. For those who actually drive their Phantoms, the instrument panel is arranged cleanly, with classic gauges and simple audio and climate controls. More complex functions are managed by an iDrive-like interface with a mouse-style controller hiding inside the center console. The rear seat provides lots of stretching-out room, of course, and the prominent C-pillars conceal the Phantom's VIPs while the rear-hinged coach doors provide them with proper ingress and egress.





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2004 Maybach 62 : 13.710 @ 106.000
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