how diesel engines work and combustion theory part 1 of 2 Davidsfarmison[bliptv]now

how diesel engines work and combustion theory part 1 of 2 Davidsfarmison[bliptv]now 1/27/2013; 'practicalcreation' adds this useful information; Hi. There are a couple engine designs that almost eliminate the need for full ignition at 45 degrees of the piston rod. http://www.neander-motors.com/engine.html http://www.neander-motors.com/neander-solution.html The rods never get vertical and the stroke for the second cylinder is always in the mirror position. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iBz2TnzLDGg The second engine design is the Scuderi or Miller cycle engine which fires below TDC. Can use both diesel or gas as fuel but a few problems with the heat adn the pressure on the valves.

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Diesel engine how it work | All information about diesal engines
https://youtu.be/ihXV9mOncvs Diesel engine how it work | All information about diesal engines https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCH7RmMz3-_cJUJsH1kp7BYg https://youtu.be/BV8OOlhurZs duke engines The diesel engine (correctly known as a compression-ignition or CI engine) is an internal combustion engine in which ignition of the fuel that has been injected into the combustion chamber is caused by the high temperature which a gas achieves (i.e. the air) when greatly compressed (adiabatic compression). Diesel engines by work compressing only the air. This increases the air temperature inside the cylinder to such a high degree that it ignites atomised diesel fuel that is injected into the combustion chamber. This contrasts with spark-ignition engines such as a petrol engine (gasoline engine) or gas engine (using a gaseous fuel as opposed to petrol), which use a spark plug to ignite an air-fuel mixture. In compression-ignition engines, glow plugs (combustion chamber pre-warmers) may be used to aid starting in cold weather, or when the engine uses a lower compression-ratio, or both. The original compression-ignition engine operates on the "constant pressure" cycle of gradual combustion and produces no audible knock. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diesel_engine





Marine Diesel Engines How they work Documentary
Marine Diesel Engines How they work Documentary .When everything is Big. Most modern ships use a reciprocating diesel engine as their prime mover, due to their operating simplicity, robustness and fuel economy compared to most other prime mover mechanisms. The rotating crankshaft can be directly coupled to the propeller with slow speed engines, via a reduction gearbox for medium and high speed engines, or via an alternator and electric motor in diesel-electric vessels. The rotation of the crankshaft is connected to the camshaft or a hydraulic pump on an intelligent diesel. The reciprocating marine diesel engine first came into use in 1903 when the diesel electric rivertanker Vandal was put into service by Branobel. Diesel engines soon offered greater efficiency than the steam turbine, but for many years had an inferior power-to-space ratio. The advent of turbocharging however hastened their adoption, by permitting greater power densities. Diesel engines today are broadly classified according to Their operating cycle: two-stroke engine or four-stroke engine Their construction: crosshead, trunk, or opposed piston Their speed Slow speed: any engine with a maximum operating speed up to 300 revolutions per minute (rpm), although most large two-stroke slow speed diesel engines operate below 120 rpm. Some very long stroke engines have a maximum speed of around 80 rpm. The largest, most powerful engines in the world are slow speed, two stroke, crosshead diesels. Medium speed: any engine with a maximum operating speed in the range 300-900 rpm. Many modern four-stroke medium speed diesel engines have a maximum operating speed of around 500 rpm. High speed: any engine with a maximum operating speed above 900 rpm. Most modern larger merchant ships use either slow speed, two stroke, crosshead engines, or medium speed, four stroke, trunk engines. Some smaller vessels may use high speed diesel engines. The size of the different types of engines is an important factor in selecting what will be installed in a new ship. Slow speed two-stroke engines are much taller, but the footprint required is smaller than that needed for equivalently rated four-stroke medium speed diesel engines. As space above the waterline is at a premium in passenger ships and ferries (especially ones with a car deck), these ships tend to use multiple medium speed engines resulting in a longer, lower engine room than that needed for two-stroke diesel engines. Multiple engine installations also give redundancy in the event of mechanical failure of one or more engines, and the potential for greater efficiency over a wider range of operating conditions. As modern ships' propellers are at their most efficient at the operating speed of most slow speed diesel engines, ships with these engines do not generally need gearboxes. Usually such propulsion systems consist of either one or two propeller shafts each with its own direct drive engine. Ships propelled by medium or high speed diesel engines may have one or two (sometimes more) propellers, commonly with one or more engines driving each propeller shaft through a gearbox. Where more than one engine is geared to a single shaft, each engine will most likely drive through a clutch, allowing engines not being used to be disconnected from the gearbox while others keep running. This arrangement lets maintenance be carried out while under way, even far from port. The Wartsila-Sulzer RTA96-C turbocharged two-stroke diesel engine is the most powerful and most efficient engine in the world today.It comes in 6 cylinder in-line through to a whopping 14 cylinder version. The cylinder bore is 38 inches and the stroke is just over 98 inches. Each cylinder displaces 111,143 cubic inches (1820 litres) and produces 7780 horsepower. Total displacement comes out to 1,556,002 cubic inches (25,480 litres) for the 14-cylinder version.The RTA96C-14 can achieve a maximum power output of 108,920 hp at 102 rpm. At a length of 89 feet and a height of 44 feet, the total engine weight is 2300 tons - the crankshaft alone weighs 300 tons.





Big Engines Starting Up
This video features Big Engine Start Up compilation If you wanna see some biggest engine sin the world watch this video and if you like the video hit the like button. We do NOT own the video materials and all credits belong to respectful owners. In case of copyright issues, please contact us immediately for further credits or clip delete. DISCLAIMER: Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing." The materials are used for illustrative and exemplification reasons, also quoting in order to recombine elements to make a new work.





How Diesel Engines Work! (Animation)
http://www.bring-knowledge-to-the-world.com/ This animation describes the working principles of diesel engines in the context of an inline-four engine that operates in a four-stroke mode. This kind of engine has four cylinders mounted in a straight line. Unlike the typical Otto-cycle engine, a diesel engine takes in only air through the intake valves during the 1st stroke. During the 2nd stroke, the intake valves are closed and the air is compressed. As the air is highly compressed in the cylinder, the temperature of the air rises and reaches almost 1300 degrees Fahrenheit. In the 3rd stroke, diesel fuel is injected directly into the cylinder. The fuel instantly ignites because of the high temperature of the air. The explosion pushes the piston down, which transfers power to the crankshaft. The 4th stroke is the process where the spent fuel-air mixture exits through the open Exhaust valves and the stroke cycle is repeated again. A big advantage of diesel engines is that they typically deliver 25-30 % better fuel economy than similarly performing gasoline engines.




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