Datsun 1600 cruise 08

Nissan Datsun Car Club Cruise 2008 celebrating the 40 years of the Datsun 1600 (Adelaide) Edited By NicoVisions

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My Datsun 1600 - 510
Datsun 1600 rebuilt in 1997 and seen here in 1999. Quad throttle bodied EFI L20 motor, CR 260Z 5spd box, R180 4.1 LSD, 4 pot front calipers disc/single pot rear calipers with bias valve, 6 point roll cage and many more little details....





Datsun 1600 (510) Nationals 2003, dyno day, cruise, show. Birdwood, Adelaide, South Australia.
A bit of old footage from the Datsun 1600 Nationals back in 2003. Includes Dyno runs at Maddat/Boostworx, and a cruise up to Birdwood for the show-n-shine. Plenty of eye candy for Datto enthusiasts including turbo v6's and Sr's on the Dyno and on display at the show and shine. Can you count how many datsuns left BigW on the cruise??? p.s. Sorry about the dodgey camera work and low resolution vid. Looks better in its original format (MiniDV taped video that was converted to WMV 240P for upload onto Youtube).





Datsun History 1930s to 1970s
Datsun is an automobile brand owned by Nissan. Datsun's original production run began in 1931. From 1958 to 1986, only vehicles exported by Nissan were identified as Datsun. In 1986, Nissan phased out the Datsun name but re-launched it in 2013 as the brand for low-cost vehicles manufactured for emerging markets. In 1931, Dat Motorcar Co. chose to name its new small car "Datson", a name which indicated the new car's smaller size when compared to the DAT's larger vehicle already in production. When Nissan took control of DAT in 1934, the name "Datson" was changed to "Datsun", because "son" also means "loss" (損 Son) in Japanese and also to honor the sun depicted in the national flag.[1] Nissan phased out the Datsun brand in March 1986. The Datsun name is most famous for the 510, Fairlady roadsters, and later the Fairlady (240Z) coupes. Datsun entered the American market in 1958, with sales in California.[15] By 1959, the company had dealers across the U.S.[15] and began selling the 310 (known as Bluebird domestically).[15] From 1962 to 1969 the Nissan Patrol utility vehicle was sold in the United States (as a competitor to the Toyota Land Cruiser J40 series), making it the only Nissan-badged product sold in the USA prior to that name's introduction worldwide decades later. From 1960 on, exports and production continued to grow. A new plant was built at Oppama, south of Yokohama; it opened in 1962. The next year, Bluebird sales first topped 200,000, and exports touched 100,000.[15] By 1964, Bluebird was being built at 10,000 cars a month.[15] For 1966, Datsun debuted the 1000, allowing owners of 360 cc (22 cu in) kei cars to move up to something bigger.[15] That same year, Datsun won the East African Safari Rally and merged with Prince Motors, giving the company the Skyline model range, as well as a test track at Murayama.[15] The company introduced the Bluebird 510 in 1967.[15] This was followed in 1968 with the iconic 240Z, which proved affordable sports cars could be built and sold profitably: it was soon the world's #1-selling sports car.[16] It relied on an engine based on the Bluebird and used Bluebird suspension components.[17] It would go on to two outright wins in the East African Rally.[17] Katayama was made Vice President of the Nissan North American subsidiary in 1960, and as long as he was involved in decision making, both as North American Vice President from 1960 to 1965, and then President of Nissan Motor Company U.S.A. from 1965 to 1975, the cars were sold as Datsuns. “What we need to do is improve our car’s efficiency gradually and creep up slowly before others notice. Then, before Detroit realizes it, we will have become an excellent car maker, and the customers will think so too. If we work hard to sell our own cars, we won’t be bothered by whatever the other manufacturers do. If all we do is worry about the other cars in the race, we will definitely lose. S321




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