Vintage Racing | 1956 Ford Thunderbird: HCCTV

It's episode 4 of Hagerty Classic Car TV! This week, news from Fall Auburn Auctions, the sights and sounds of the Rolex Monterey Motorsports Reunion at Laguna Seca and a ride along in a 1956 Ford Thunderbird. Plus, host Matt Richmond admires a very tiny car. For more visit http://www.hagerty.com Subscribe! | http://bit.ly/1sddOmD LIKE us on FACEBOOK | https://www.facebook.com/HagertyClassicCars/ FOLLOW us on TWITTER | https://twitter.com/hagerty JOIN our circle on GOOGLE PLUS | https://plus.google.com/+Hagerty FOLLOW us on INSTAGRAM | https://instagram.com/hagertyclassiccars/ Find out more about Hagerty | http://www.hagerty.com HAGERTY VALUATION TOOLS | https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL11A9D1D9D04C6B8C FEATURED VIDEOS | https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLHKCmmH-x9mKdOsoMmYDwL8qHYJ5Tn6dG RIDE ALONGS | https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLHKCmmH-x9mIGSmYHJAoy1j0ngWXgOS6s Hagerty is your definitive source for all things classic: compelling stories about cool cars and the people who love them; the latest on collector car values and market trends; and all the eye candy, roaring engines and nostalgia you can handle. So strap down, settle in and cruise with us a while. We’re glad you’re here. Contact us. Phone: 877-922-9701 Fax: 231-941-8227 Suggestions and/or Complaints: Your2Cents@hagerty.com Marketing & Event Inquiries: marketing@hagerty.com Media Inquiries: press@hagerty.com

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1955 Ford Thunderbird: Back in Black -- /BIG MUSCLE
It's been in the same family for the better part of 50 years. Been modified with performance and weight savings in mind, and is one of the sleekest looking cars we've ever come across. This 1955 Ford Thunderbird is no secretaries car, but a purpose built award winning street machine that was built in a time before resto-modding old cars was all the rage.





History of the Ford Thunderbird Full Documentary
Considered a classic at the time of its introduction, the Ford Thunderbird was debuted at the Detroit Auto Show in 1954. The popularity of the sleek two-seater was welcome news for the Ford Motor Company. Ford took a calculated risk with its decision to develop a car that could compete with the Corvette, released by Chevrolet in 1953, and it soon became clear that Ford's research was about to pay off. Information from a marketing study suggested that the target buyer for the Thunderbird was middle aged, well-established in a professional career, and relatively conservative regarding car design. Rather than radically redesign a new sports car, Ford opted for contemporary styling. This decision was not only in line with what Ford had learned from their marketing study, but had the added benefit of keeping production costs for the Little Bird low, as it shared many Ford stock parts with full sized cars in the Ford line. What set the classic T-Bird apart from the Corvette, as well as many of the sports cars entering the American market from Europe, was a design that highlighted personal luxury instead of the austere sports car styling of the era. The Thunderbird sported roll up windows, a steel body and, taking a leap over the six-cylinder Corvette, a 292 cubic inch V8 engine. The V8 engine proved to be a tight squeeze for a car designed with a low cowl height and created a clearance problem between the engine's air cleaner and the hood. Ford's solution, a feature that would continue to be part of the Thunderbird's design for years to come, was to add a hood scoop. The Little Bird was only available as a convertible, either with a collapsible soft top or removable hardtop. Sales for the introductory 1955 Thunderbird were good at 16,155. Ford decided to retain their successful formula for 1956, and the new Thunderbird varied little from its predecessor. Some notable changes included more power under the hood, cooling vents in the fenders, and, addressing a common customer complaint, more cargo space. The Continental kit was Ford's effort to increase trunk space without changing the overall design of the car. Moving the spare tire from the trunk to the rear bumper did allow for more trunk space, but the kit's additional weight, which was distributed well behind the rear axle, caused handling problems. In addition to the handling problems it caused, the Continental kit's location impeded access to the trunk. By 1956, Chevrolet was responding to the T-Bird by equipping the Corvette with a V8 engine and roll up windows. Sales for Thunderbird, at 15,631, were slightly less than the 1955 numbers and Ford implemented some changes for 1957. The Thunderbird received new styling for 1957 that included a front bumper with integrated parking lights, a larger grille, and sweeping tailfins that mirrored the points sported by its larger cousins in the Ford line-up that year. Unable to successfully correct the issues associated with the Continental kit, Ford returned the spare tire to a larger redesigned trunk.





1957 Ford Thunderbird race car Dream Car Garage 2004 TV series
1957 Thunderbird race car video segment from Legendary Motorcar's Dream Car Garage 2004 TV series: Vintage Dream Cars. LMC current inventory http://www.legendarymotorcar.com/currentinventory LMC special cars inventory http://www.legendarymotorcar.com/specialcars Legendary Motorcar Company has the following services available: ground-up and partial restorations, complete paint facilities, mechanical services, full race car prep and fabrication, complete hot rod/pro-touring builds, door to door shipping and more. Please visit our website www.legendarymotorcar.com for more information.





1958-1960 Ford Thunderbird - The Square Bird
The 1958-1960 Ford Thunderbird, carved out a special legacy in the U.S. auto market by being the first personal luxury (2-door) car. By the 1970s this personal luxury car segment which the 1958 T-Bird had originally created, was the hottest growing segment in the U.S. The 1958-1960 T-Bird is the car that McNamara created and it's special place in history will forever be preserved. This video tells the story of the history of the 1958, 1959, and 1960 T-Bird.




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