Infiniti G35 Coupe--Chicago Cars Direct HD

HD Video--Detailed test drive and walkaround of a beautiful Infiniti G35 Coupe from Chicago Cars Direct.

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Infiniti G35 Coupe--Chicago Cars Direct
Detailed test drive and walkaround of a beautiful 2005 Infiniti G35 Coupe with Chris from Chicago Cars Direct.





Infiniti G35 Sport Coupe--Chicago Cars Direct HD
Test drive and walkaround of a 2006 Infiniti G35 Coupe from Chicago Cars Direct.





Ford Mustang **Roush 427 R** **435 Horsepower** Chicago Cars Direct HD
Test drive of a stunning Supercharged 427R Stage 3 Roush Mustang from Chicago Cars Direct. Jack Roush knows a thing or two about racing and Mustangs. His road racing career includes more than 110 wins and 20 national championships, and this vast expertise is evident throughout the ROUSH 427R Trak Pak. Designed for the daily driver who enjoys pushing his car to the limits on open track days, the ROUSH 427R Trak Pak Mustang has plenty of specialized content to accommodate the unique needs of those who like driving up to the edge on the racetrack in a safe, controlled environment. With the addition of the intercooled ROUSHcharger™ the 427R Trak Pak Mustang has 435 horsepower and 400 lb.-ft. of torque, plenty of power to quickly get up to speed on the straightaways. The cooling system has been enhanced with a black bar high flow front grille and radiator cooling shields. There is a functional strut tower brace under the hood to help strengthen the chassis and decrease unwanted twisting. The suspension system has been completely revamped to easily manage the twists and turns of a road course. The ROUSH 427R Trak Pak suspension includes adjustable front and rear shocks, front and rear springs, front and rear stabilization bars, front and rear jounce bumpers and adjustable camber/caster plates. To whoa this pony down ROUSH adds 6-piston front calipers with 14-inch, two-piece slotted front rotors and slotted rear rotors. The brake pads are replaced with high-performance racing quality versions, and the new ROUSH brake cooling system and high temperature brake fluid will ensure that the brakes will be ready when you need them the most. The ROUSH three-piece aerobody kit gives the car a menacing look as it roars past the other cars on the track, and consists of a front fascia, front chin spoiler and hood scoop. The car rides on 18-inch forged wheels painted a dark charcoal and mounted to ultra-performance tires for maximum grip on the racetrack. The functional hood pins, unique graphics and badging add to the overall styling of the car. Inside the cockpit the driver will immediately notice the addition of the new three-gauge dash pod with engine oil temperature, coolent temperature and a Boost gauge. A shift light has also been integrated into this dash pod as well. The ROUSH sport leather seating, short throw shifter with retro-style ball, and four-piece performance pedal kit help to round out the interior styling. The number 427 has been intertwined in the Ford product line for many years, both as a car model and one of the most powerful and legendary engines in their line. It is only natural that ROUSH, as perhaps the best Ford engine builder in the country, is the company to reintroduce the number to the automotive lexicon using modern engine technology. Based on the acclaimed ROUSH Stage 3 Mustang, this version is slightly less in content but includes 100 percent of the fun factor. The 427R horsepower package is highlighted by the intercooled ROUSHcharger* system which adds 135 horsepower and 65 lb-ft of torque to the base Ford 4.6L, 3-valve V8 powertrain system. The additional power upgrade comes via a ROUSH-engineered ECM calibration which has been specially-tuned to work in harmony with the different Exhaust system used on the vehicle. The resulting total power rating for this vehicle is 435hp and 400 lb-ft of torque. Further adding to the style and performance of the 2008 ROUSH 427R is a four-piece aerobody kit which includes a stylized front fascia, front chin spoiler, hood scoop and rear wing and ROUSH 18-inch cast chrome wheels with high-performance tires and the special 427R striping kit. We've driven our fair share of Mustangs, but it's a rare occasion that we get to drive one at the track. That's part of the reason why we made the seven hour trek from Southern California to Thunderhill Raceway in Willows, CA, to get behind the wheel of Roush's new 427R Trak Pak Mustang. What's so special about the Trak Pak? For starters, it's got a supercharged V8 packing 435 horsepower and an abundance of race-ready items like an adjustable suspension, carbon fiber wing, and 14-inch brakes that all make it ideal for the weekend warrior who wants his vehicle to handle the daily grind and track-day floggings. With only 100 being built, this may be one of the few opportunities to see one in the sheetmetal, let alone to drive it on the track. While inclement weather the night before threatened to ruin the trip, we were blessed with a rain-free day, allowing us to explore the limits of the Trak Pak'd 427R. Follow the jump to read our impressions





BMW 335i Twin Turbo Test Drive and Walkaround from Chicago Cars Direct
Video Presentation and Walk Around of the 2007 BMW 335i Sport Sedan with Chris Moran of Chicago Cars Direct. The data doesn't make any sense. We're tearing our collective hair out trying to determine why the track-test numbers from our 2007 BMW 335i test car are so far off. Our freshly minted 3 Series twin-turbo coupe has not only eclipsed BMW's own impressive performance figures — by a ton — it's also smoked those of the 2005 BMW M3 Competition Package, a car we called "The Best M3 Ever Sold in America." And while that admittedly turbo-deprived car had been a six-speed manual, the Arctic Metallic 2007 BMW 335i Coupe cooling in the driveway is but an automatic. Nothing about our Austrian First Drive of the car prepared us for this. More than half fast Consider the facts: This 2007 BMW 335i test car blazed from zero to 60 in 4.8 seconds. BMW says the new coupe mit twin-turbo engine and Steptronic six-speed autobox should make that trip in 5.5 seconds. Seven-tenths of a second quicker? That's 13-percent better than BMW's claim. Folks give aftermarket tuners wads of cash for that kind of performance bump, especially when a car starts out in the mid 5s to begin with. Our 335i similarly scalded the quarter-mile in 13.3 seconds at 105.9 mph. For comparison, our 2005 M3 Competition Package used up 5.5 seconds getting to 60 and finished the quarter-mile in 13.7 seconds at 105.4 mph — close, but still a rearview-mirror performance. We almost beat the all-powerful 2007 Audi RS4, too. Despite a 120-horsepower advantage and all-wheel-drive launch superiority, it just nicked our 335i's 0-60 and quarter-mile times by a paltry 0.1 second each. Something's up. Could BMW be soft-pedaling the output and performance numbers to leave marketing headroom for a more outrageous 2008 M3 V8 to come? Did the luck of the draw or some other means provide us with an overachiever? We've gotta check into this. Dyno hum There can be no doubt that BMW's new twin-turbo 3.0-liter straight-6 engine, complete with direct injection and a high 10.2:1 compression ratio, is impressive. Two smaller snails were assigned to only three cylinders each so they'd spin up faster, reducing lag and increasing torque at low engine speeds. Boy, does it work, as this beastie is rated at 300 hp at 5,800 rpm and 300 pound-feet of torque spreading from 1,400-5,000 rpm. In a rear-drive coupe weighing in at 3,579 as-tested pounds, that sounds about right — for 5.5-second 0-60 bursts, that is. In order to see what she's really putting out, we've brought our 335i to the chassis dynamometer at MD Automotive in Westminster, California. And since chassis Dyno figures are always lower than manufacturer ratings because the former includes drivetrain losses and the latter does not, we've secured the help of an alert reader who has volunteered his month-old 335i for comparison. Steve Harrison's identically equipped 335i automatic is fresh off a trip up the California coast and all broken in. We should be able to tell if our press car's performance is unique or not. After a short time, two sets of fresh numbers sit before us. Steve's car produces 272 rear-wheel hp at 5,970 rpm. Considering drivetrain losses, he's easily seeing the promised 300 horses at the flywheel, probably more. Our test car produces a similar 273 at 5,970. But wait, there's more: While Steve's motor gently tapers off as rpm exceeds six grand, our mill continues to make more power until it tops out at 279 at 6,295 rpm, at which point Steve's 335i lags 19 ponies behind. Notably, our car maintains its advantage for the remainder of the rev range. So what's up? A comparison to BMW data shows that Steve has nothing to be worried about, as his 335i's rear-wheel output curve looks about right when compared to factory flywheel data. Our car is simply stronger in such a way that makes our pavement-melting 4.8-second 0-60 more understandable. But why? We're glad you asked. MD's Dyno can also measure turbo Boost during runs. It turns out that at any given rpm in the disputed region between 5,000 and 6,500, our car consistently makes about 0.5 psi more Boost. Subtle, but a little goes a long way. Is this mere production variation? We can't dig deep enough to know for sure. If anything, this exercise underscores the potential of aftermarket chip tuning. Ain't electronically controlled turbo engines fun? For the record, during a desert freeway assault to Vegas at an average speed we don't care to print, the 335i achieved 25.9 mpg, compared to a 29-mpg EPA highway rating. With a lot of city and freeway stop-and-go thrown in, the overall average drops to 20.3 — just above the 20-mpg EPA city rating. With less lead in the shoes, the EPA figures actually seem attainable.




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