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Autoclub Highside Crash, MyThrottle.net GSXR Ouch!

What are the odds of a Go-Pro camera catching a full highside! I don't know, watch this and find out! Recorded Jan 7 2011, right before the WERA weekend. Looks like I'm out for a while...Thank God I walked away without any breaks. I will post pictures of the bike at MyThrottle.net once I'm a little better off.


 


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Highside Motorcycle Crash - 8/18/2012
2003 Kawasaki 636 highside crash on Mulholland Hwy in Malibu California. Rider was uninjured. Brake reservoir was damaged but bike was ridden home. 31200 Mulholland Hwy, Malibu, CA 90265





Fontana Track Day 1/7/11 ZX6R
Track Day on my 09 ZX6R at Autoclub Speedway. Group 3 with Fastrack Riders.





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Bike Crash / GSXR 1000 at BM 6/1/08
David put down his bike for not listening to his guts.





Fontana Track Day Fastrack Riders 1/7/11
Lap around Fontana AMA track. Group 3 on my 2009 Kawasaki ZX6R.





GSXR Crash when he is Showing Off





Motorcycle Q&A: How do I prevent a highside crash?
BMW's pro racer, Nate Kern talks with Carlyle about dealing with highside crashes. High Side: "A highsider or highside is a type of motorcycle accident characterized by sudden & violent rotation of the bike around its long axis. This generally happens when the rear wheel loses traction, skids, and then suddenly regains traction, creating a large torque which flips the rider head first off the road. The initial traction loss may be caused by a rear locked wheel due to excessive braking or by applying too much throttle when exiting a corner or by oversteering the bike in the turn or by any loss of traction to the rear wheel. Examples are: attempting to turn too sharply and leaning the bike past the limit of tire adhesion; rolling off the edge of the tire sidewall; levering the rear tire off the ground by scraping the Exhaust, peg, leg, foot, or knee; or overstressing the rear tire if it's too cold or worn-out or there is oil, water, sand, dirt, ice, paint marks, or other patches of reduced traction on the road. Highsides differ from lowsides as follows: during a lowside the rear wheel slips laterally and continuously until the bike falls onto its side -- the side that's inside the corner, while during a highside the rear wheel slips laterally only briefly before suddenly regaining traction and flipping the bike onto its other side -- the side that's outside the corner. As a result highsides happen very quickly with little if any warning and are very violent. If the slipping rear tire suddenly regains traction while the bike is side-slipping, the motorcycle will straighten-up very quickly. Often the rider is thrown off before they can regain balance & control." Source: Wikipedia Nate Kern Nate Kern has established himself as one of the most promising racers of his time. He had only ridden on the track a few times before his March 2002 debut at Daytona Int. Speedway where he won 8 of 8 races and was immediately moved to pro status. Country: U.S.A. Greatest successes 2002 -- 3rd place CCS Mid Atlantic Championship 2003 -- 2nd place WERA lightweight twins 2004 -- BMW Motorrad BoxerCup 2004 2005 -- Champion CCS Mid Atlantic and Southeast region 2006 -- Champion CCS Mid Atlantic and Southeast region, 1st place Sun Trust Moto-ST "8 Hours at Daytona" __________________________________________________ Facebook - Carlyle's Picks http://www.facebook.com/pages/Carlyles-Picks/1779510588





Dance of the Motorcycle Highside - Motorcycle Highside Compilation
Highsides. They’re violent, they’re unexpected and they’re spectacular to witness but they’re not something any rider wants to ever experience firsthand. So what causes a motorcycle highside? Can you do anything prevent them? And is there anything you can do to stop when if you feel it happening? Check out our article at http://therideadvice.com/dance-highside/ which goes into more detail with diagrams and further animations about highsides. In simple terms, a highside occurs when the rear tire loses traction while and then regains traction – the rear tire biting and gripping onto the road. Counter intuitively, you’d think that regaining traction would be good but the problem is that in the small fraction of a second between losing traction and then regaining it, the bike has rotated along its axis. When the rear tire regains traction, it causes all sorts of physics to occur – none of it generally very helpful to staying upright. When this happens, you essentially have two forces working in different directions. The front wheel is pointed one way and the rear wheel another. The one that wins is the rear wheel, where all the power is being delivered. Here’s a slightly more technical explanation courtesy of Wikipedia: When going through a curve on a motorcycle, centripetal force (added to the other lateral forces such as acceleration or deceleration) is transferred from the road to the motorcycle through the contact patch, and is directed at a right angle to the path of travel. If the net force is greater than the static friction coefficient of the tire multiplied by the normal force of the motorcycle through the tire, the tire will skid outwards from the direction of the curve. Once a tire slips in a curve, it will move outwards under the motorcycle. So what are the actual causes of a highside? A highside can occur from any of the following: - Locking the rear wheel through excessive braking - Applying too much throttle when exiting a corner - Oversteering the bike into the turn by shifting weight to the front wheel and using balance to drift the rear wheel sideways - Exceeding the lateral grip through too much speed (although, this is more likely to result in a lowside), or too much lean an unexpected change in the surface friction (water, oil, dust, gravel, etc) - Reducing the friction on the rear tire by scraping the bodywork of the motorcycle on the road surface Of the causes above, the only one that you as a rider really have a hope of saving is when you lock the rear wheel. Most of you probably remember in your motorcycle licensing/training course that if you lock the front wheels, get off the brakes as soon as possible but if you lock the rear wheel, keep that rear wheel locked until you come to a stop (or at least a slow pace). And that’s because you don’t want to let the rear tire grip again as doing so can cause a highside. But what about the massive highsides that we showed in the video above? Those weren't caused by rear wheel locks but usually by a loss of traction from too much speed in the turns. What are you as a rider able to do to save yourself from such a highside? The only cure is prevention – don’t ever let the rear wheel lose traction because once it does, it’s nearly impossible to come back from. It should be evidence enough that the best of the best in Moto GP and WSBK can’t stop highsides but in case you think you’re better than them, just look at most of the examples in this video. Between when the tire loses grip and regains grip is probably 0.10 to 0.20 seconds. As a human being you just can’t recreate quick enough to do anything about it, especially at the speeds and forces at play. The only piece of advice that we can really give you is that if you have superhuman reflexes and believe you can save a highside, remember the age old phrase - when in doubt, gas it. By intentionally getting on the throttle you'll hopefully continue to break traction and maybe, just maybe you'll save it (or at least lowside instead of highside). The good news is that highsides are much less frequent than they used to be with modern technology – both on the track and the road. In MotoGP (especially the premier class), despite the sheer amount of horsepower being transferred to the rear wheel and the incredible lean angles acheived, highsides are actually fairly rare. Due to electronic aids like traction control, slip control and so forth, highsides only occur in extreme circumstances. On the road, highsides generally don’t occur too often anyway as you won’t be (at least you shouldn’t be) hitting speeds in corners where your rear wheel loses grip. With ABS and traction control becoming increasingly common, you’ll have to be pretty unlucky (dirt, gravel, oil or some other substance on the road) or maybe just a little bit stupid (the roads aren’t a racetrack for good reason).





87 GSXR 750/ 1127 CRASH
Dry-Nitro Dragbike





Motorcycle Crash & Burn on Mulholland
Click this link To watch all 80 crashes captured over the past four years. http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL467A2492C0B9CBFF Mulholland Highway in Los Angeles has been a mecca for motorcycles & fast cars for decades. Car and motorcycle clubs are regular visitors every weekend. Jay Leno can often be found at the famous Rockstore and at a view point called Lookout talking with fellow motor enthusiasts. Crashes are common as well as a heavy police presence on most weekends. The Snake is a two mile section of Mulholland above the Rockstore. Riders usually will make multiple runs allowing me to move from corner to corner when assembling rider videos. The speed limit is 45 mph, most riders are not going much over that so the majority of tickets are crossing the line, wheelies or equipment violations. Bicycles are up here all the time but motorcycles and bikes seem to do fine together as long as the cyclists are willing to stay to the right. Cars passing them are a bigger problem since there is no shoulder and most turns are blind. I mainly shoot on the last corner coming up because I can see much of the road and photogs are expected. The turn gets it's fair share of crashes but people crash other places also just no one is filming. The top corner I shoot seem to average one crash every couple weeks in the summer, out of many hundreds of riders. 911 emergency services are rarely called and accidents are seldom reported since most riders do not get injured severely. Google Street View - http://goo.gl/wsMi





Streets of Willow Springs with Starlane Overlay
A novice practicing on the track. Streets of Willow Springs is a fun and technical tack. The track is 1.8 miles long, and a great place to work on your technical skills and hard braking. It has a fun "bowl" before you hit the straight. Lots of tight turns and a few elevation changes to keep you busy. The Timer Used is a Starlane Athon GPS Laptimer. My FL and intermediates are not directly the same as the track so that is why is was difficult to perfectly synchronize the video to the overlay.





Ring Knutstorp 2005 Suzuki GSXR collision & crash
My first crash. Broke my collarbone - Bike was fine.





R1 GSXR ZXR ET 636 ACCIDENT MONTAGNE a ne pas faire
GROSSE GAMELLE EN LIVE CAMERA EMBARQUE ce qui ne faut pas faire, se prendre pour des bons alors qu'on ait nul ; j'étai le seul en combi avec 35 degrés mais ce qui sont allé au ta il leur manque pas mal de chair se sont des pilotes de cartier faire du bruit dans la cité c plus facile!





GIXXER 1000 K8 FLY BY & ALMOST HIGHSIDE (GO PRO HD)
Almost a bad day! Thumbs up for the OHLINS steering damper!!!





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