Wishes on Wheels - Chrysler Forward Look

Forward Look was a design theme employed by Virgil Exner in styling the 1955 through 1961 Chrysler Corporation vehicles. When Exner joined Chrysler, the company's vehicles were being fashioned by engineers instead of designers, and so were considered outmoded, unstylish designs. Exner fought to change this structuring, and got control over the design process, including the clay prototypes and the die models used to create production tooling. 300C Production 1957 After seeing the P-38-inspired tailfins on the 1948 Cadillac, Exner adopted fins as a central element of his vehicle designs. He believed in the aerodynamic benefits of the fins, and even used wind tunnel testing at the University of Michigan—but he also liked their visual effects on the car. Exner lowered the roofline and made the cars sleeker, smoother, and more aggressive. In 1955, Chrysler introduced "The New 100-Million Dollar Look". With a long hood and short deck, the wedgelike designs of the Chrysler 300 letter series and revised 1957 models suddenly brought the company to the forefront of design, with Ford and General Motors quickly working to catch up. The 1957 Plymouths were advertised with the slogan, "Suddenly, it's 1960!" A Mopar oil filter from the late 1950s bears the Forward Look logo Fins soon lost popularity. By the late 1950s Cadillac, Chrysler and many other marques had escalated the size of fins until some thought they were stylistically questionable, and they became a symbol of American excess in the early 60s. 1961 is considered the last of the "Forward Look" designs. The 1962's were referred to as "plucked chickens" by Exner.

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Pontiacs for 1964
John DeLorean replaced Pete Estes as general manager, and he continued the same emphasis on performance that Bunkie Knudsen and Estes had begun. The big news for 1964 For 1964, the Tempest and LeMans' transaxle design was dropped and the cars were redesigned under GM's new A body platform; frame cars with a conventional front-engine, rear-wheel-drive layout. The most important of these is the GTO, short for "Gran Turismo Omologato," the Italian for "Grand Touring, Homologated" used by Ferrari as a badge to announce a car's official qualification for racing. In spite of a GM unwritten edict against engines larger than 330 ci in intermediate cars, DeLorean (with support from Jim Wangers from Pontiac's ad agency), came up with the idea to offer the GTO as a dealer option package that included a 389 ci engine rated at 325 or 348 horsepower (260 kW). Source: Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pontiac S013

Chrysler Years of Progress - 1924 - 1941
1924 to 1941. Start with caveman and journey ahead to the modern Chrsyler corporation with its industrial might. See traffic, freeways, designers, engineers, factories and cars on the road. S154

The Development of the Chrysler K Car
The Chrysler Corporation's K-cars were an automobile platform of compact-to-midsize cars designed to carry six adults on two bench seats and were aimed not only to replace Chrysler's nominally compact F-body Aspen and Volaré, but also to compete with intermediates like the Chevrolet Malibu and Ford Fairmont. Based on their passenger space, the K-cars were placed in the same "midsize" category by the United States Environmental Protection Agency as Chrysler's significantly larger and heavier M-body cars[1] The K cars have been categorized as compact for their external size and small front-wheel drive layout. Technically, the K cars include only the Dodge Aries, Plymouth Reliant, second generation Chrysler LeBaron, and the Dodge 400, which used the K platform. The rest of the K-derivatives, including Chrysler's minivans, were based on the K platform with adaptations and modifications to suit vehicles of different sizes and intended usage. These vehicles had modified suspensions and were longer and heavier than the original K-cars, but all had the same basic architecture: a solid beam rear axle, independent front suspensions with MacPherson struts, and front-wheel drive (except for the AWD minivans). Sometimes, they also shared numerous internal components and trim pieces (e.g., the Reliant and first-generation Voyager). Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chrysler_K_platform S146

First Corvettes Being Built - 1953
Rare home movies chronicle the first Corvettes going into production. Each one is built by hand at the GM factory in Flint, Michigan. Only 300 Corvettes were built that first year. All 1953 Corvettes were white with a red interior, all had Powerglide automatic transmissions mated to 150 HP, six cylinder engines with three carburetors and dual Exhaust. Of those 300, 255 survived. Source: http://www.corvettemuseum.org/library-archives/chronicle/1953b.html