Vive La Difference! (Ford Consul Cortina Mk1) - 1962

The revolutionary Ford Consul Cortina was launched in 1962, and was an immediate success. This film was made to show potential purchasers how versatile it was, and how Ford had gone to great lengths to research it ahead of producing this exciting new family car.

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Ford Cortina Mk I Testing - 1962
This 1962 film shows the brand new Ford Cortina Mark I - "a small car with a big difference" - being tested at the British Army's Fighting Vehicles Test Ground. The statistics reveal the car to have an acceleration of 0-60 MPH in a mighty 25 seconds. The eagle-eyed among you will spot that the car is badged "Consul 225", a name that never made it on to a production model.





Five Stars Ahead (Ford Anglia & Prefect) - 1952
This is the 1952 launch film for the new E100A Ford Anglia and Prefect range. Shot in 35mm, this film has some lovely shots of Ford's design studios, the factory at Dagenham, the prototypes undergoing testing, and finishes with the new cars being used by delighted families. Filled with optimism, this film captures the mood of motoring from the time, where the country was emerging from the post-war gloom days and looking to a brighter new future.





Ford Cortina MK1 Owners Club National Show 2010
Ford Cortina MK1 Owners Club National Show 2010 @ Stratford-Upon-Avon RaceCourse





New Ford Cortina Introduction 1970s
In the late 1960s, Ford set about developing the third-generation Cortina, the Mark III, which would be produced in higher volumes than before, following the recent merger of Ford of Britain and Ford of Germany into the modern-day Ford of Europe. The car marked the convergence of the German Taunus and British Cortina platforms with only minor differences between the two, hence the car's internal name TC1, standing for Taunus-Cortina. It was also the last European car engineered by Harley Copp as Vice President Engineering and head of Brentwood, before he returned to Detroit. Ford UK originally wanted to call it something other than Cortina, but the name stuck. Although the Mark III looked significantly larger than the boxier Mark II Cortina, it was actually the same overall length, but 4 inches (100 mm) wider.[22] Within the overall length, a wheelbase lengthened by more than 3 inches (76 mm) also contributed to the slightly more spacious interior.[22] The Mark III Cortina was inspired by the contemporary "coke bottle" design language which had emanated from Detroit – the car sported similar fluted bonnet and beltline design elements to the North American Mercury Montego and Ford LTD of the same era. It replaced both the Mark II Cortina and the larger, more expensive Ford Corsair, offering more trim levels and the option of larger engines than the Mark II Cortina. The Mark III's continental European sister car – the Taunus TC – was subtly different in appearance, with longer front indicators, different door skins and rear wing pressings that toned down the drooping beltline in order to lose the "coke-bottle" appearance of the Cortina. The MacPherson strut front suspension was replaced with more conventional double A-arm suspension (Also known as double wishbone suspension) which gave the Mark III a much softer ride on the road' but did give cars fitted with the larger, heavier engines distinct understeer. Trim levels for the Mark III Cortina were Base, L (for Luxury), XL (Xtra Luxury), GT (Grand Touring) and GXL (Grand Xtra Luxury). S607




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