Valve Float

This is a video showing valve float in a running engine at high RPM.

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Cylinder Head 204 - Porting & Polishing
This is a first-generation 1992 1.6L Hyundai Elantra small-combustion-chamber head. Thats what it is. It's a J1 Elantra cylinder head. Good luck finding another one like it. (read more)... In Cylinder Head 106 I talked about the mainstream porting theories as they are discussed. We looked at a cylinder head that I have thousands of dollars of professional work performed on, and a bone-stock second-generation head that I didn't port. In this video I just might do something you haven't seen done before. For some, that may be uncomfortable. The port and polish job I perform here is what I think will work best for my current build. This is not an extreme killer port job. What will be different here is where port textures are concerned, I will be following the advice of a reputable source that will remain un-named. You're free to port yours differently than I do in this video, and I give you that out, around the 20 minute marker. The Hyundai is far from being an ultimate-performance build. It's a $400 box of scraps with nothing but time invested. It's perfect for this video. My finished product WILL be an improvement over what I had. I don't yet have access to a flow bench. I still have an achievement to un-lock. As far as you should be concerned with the techniques I employ... without flow numbers there is no evidence of what this will do, but we will gather lots of info from dynp sessions and drag strip time slips. If I could test it on a flow bench, I would. There are MANY, and when I say many, I mean thousands of flame war mongering pirates floating around on rough seas with a hair trigger cannon finger itching to fire if you port a head any differently than what the herd mentality says to do while porting a cylinder head. I cover the herd mentality because it has merit. It's been tested. Tried and true. But I don't follow it to the letter of the law. I'm definitely not here to de-bunk it. I would port a cylinder head differently for each build based on how that engine was used. There's an extremely valid reason why relating to air speed. It's not the texture of a port that maximizes the effect of fuel atomization, but the velocity of the air running through an x or y sized valve. The driving factor in this is the piston speed. I'm not going to give you the technical information, but will refer you to information about the Lovell factor. There's a better description of this in the links below, and even a calculator to help you find your engine's sweet spot. Why the Lovell factor is important: https://www.highpowermedia.com/blog/3346/the-effect-of-valve-size Lovell gas factor calculator: http://www.rbracing-rsr.com/lovellgascalc.html Only people who have flow testing equipment know for sure what really works and have the capability to produce a perfectly-matched port job for the ultimate performance build. Those guys know the definition of ultimate, and THEY are floating below the water Aegis-class submarines ready to blow your comment up if you don't know what you're talking about. They don't care if you're an armchair mechanic or a herd of pirates. I will say, they're zoomed in pretty close on me right now, and I'm expecting to take a few hits. My work will be tested based on Dyno and drag strip performance, and the results will be posted here. Fortunately, those kinds of videos are a WHOLE LOT EASIER TO MAKE!!!





Overhead Cam at 14K RPM
This video shows an operational cutaway of a BMW S1000RR — a 193HP superbike — bumping against its 14,200RPM redline. A cam and valvetrain at 118 cycles per second is an amazing sight (and sound)





PISTONS @ 10.000RPM
Check my other pages for news and pictures Twitter https://twitter.com/colin_furze Instagram https://www.instagram.com/realcolinfurze/ Facebook https://www.facebook.com/Colin-furze-521680751253584 http://www.colinfurze.com THIS WAS DONE ON A SHIT BACKROAD THAT LEADS TO A FARM NO MOTORBIKES COME DOWN THIS ROAD UNLESS THEY WANT A SACK OF POTATOES BUT TRY PUTTING THEM ON YOUR R1 .The second part was filmed on a more used road but oil had all gone by then so stop worrying i ride a bike to you no. Amazing footage of a set of normal 4 cylinder car pistons moving at normal speed and more. As a petrol head i no this happens but to actually see the speed for real is just wicked. My favirite bit is when they look like there slowing down Poor old rover 200 Honors- #1 - Top Rated (Today) - Cars & Vehicles #1 - Top Favourited (Today) - Cars & Vehicles #1 - Most Discussed (Today) - Cars & Vehicles





What does the inside of an engine with a Bad Head Gasket look like?
Ever wonder what the inside of your engine looks like? How about what a head gasket failure, an overheating motor, or a melted piston looks like? In this video I go deep inside an engine using a bore scope (endoscope) to look through the spark plug hole in my Chrysler PT Cruiser with a blown engine. Stay tuned till the end because I show you the inside of a cylinder in my Chevy Corvette, Mercury Milan, and a Craftsman Lawnmower. Here is a link to the bore scope: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00JERRES6/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789& creative=390957&creativeASIN=B00JERRES6&linkCode=as2&tag=chri0e2-20&linkId= IK3Y2SYFURYMBGXQ The engine had a small head gasket leak and needed some coolant every month, but nothing serious. Then one day on the highway, it overheated and by the time the driver pulled off the road, the engine blew up. **If the video was helpful, remember to give it a "thumbs up" and consider subscribing. New videos every Thursday** -Website: https://www.ChrisFixed.com -Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/chrisfix8 -Twitter: https://twitter.com/ChrisFixed -Instagram: https://instagram.com/chrisfixit -Subscribe Here: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=paintballoo7 -YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/ChrisFix Disclaimer: Due to factors beyond the control of ChrisFix, I cannot guarantee against improper use or unauthorized modifications of this information. ChrisFix assumes no liability for property damage or injury incurred as a result of any of the information contained in this video. Use this information at your own risk. ChrisFix recommends safe practices when working on vehicles and or with tools seen or implied in this video. Due to factors beyond the control of ChrisFix, no information contained in this video shall create any expressed or implied warranty or guarantee of any particular result. Any injury, damage, or loss that may result from improper use of these tools, equipment, or from the information contained in this video is the sole responsibility of the user and not ChrisFix.




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