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New Nissan Juke 1.6 Liter Turbo Engine - ANIMATION - Very Cool Video

Watch a video on the new 1.6 liter 4 cylinder turbocharged engine in the new Nissan Juke. The video is animated and systematically show the engine in pieces and then puts it together and shows how it runs. The 1.6 turbo is part of the wave of new small displacement turbocharged gas engines coming to this country. The reason is to provide high fuel economy, low emissions and high power output when needed.


 


More Videos...


4 Cylinder Engine Cutaway Animation
See how a modern 1.3 liter dual overhead cam, 4 valve per cylinder, turbocharged & intercooled 4 cylinder engine with variable valve timing on the intake works.





Nissan Juke AWD Torque Vectoring Animation Video
Watch an explanatory video showing how Nissan Juke innovative awd all wheel drive system works.





Ford Police Interceptor - All Wheel Drive Get Stuck Test
Ford demonstrated the virtues of its all-wheel-drive system on police vehicle compared with Chevy and Dodge.





2011 Nissan Juke - Urban AWD CUV - Walkaround Video
2011 Nissan Juke video - Watch a video of the totally new 2011 Nissan Juke. The Juke is a compact CUV with seating for 5, a hatch and high ground clearance. It is powered by a new turbocharged direct injection 1.6 liter 4 making over 180 horsepower. The Juke is a very interesting all-purpose, all-weather small vehicle that drives very nicely, has upscale features and gets great fuel economy.





► Bentley Factory - W12 Engine
► If you love cars, you should subscribe now to YouCar's channel: http://urlz.fr/lEd Go ahead, it's free! All the Best.





How an engine works - comprehensive tutorial animation featuring Toyota engine technologies
Nobody this video was designed for needed to know or cared about discontinued Supra (or other long discontinued inline 6) engines so don't bother posting a comment about them. This was 2007 and newer US MARKET ONLY Toyota technologies.





How a Differential Works and Types of Differentials
www.curvedspacecreative.com Video I created for Toyota in 2007. This was produced on a budget but its purpose is to explain the concepts and not be a Pixar-budget film. See other videos at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zA_19bHxEYg http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UpP6WYKrtS4 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MMrBDdLGB20 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hwwXukJaTlM See our iPad application at: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/2013-lexus-es/id545743510?mt=8





Nissan Juke 1.6 DIG-T (190 PS) 4WD CVT Acceleration 0-210 km/h (Manual mode)
Video showing acceleration from 0 to 210 km/h (top speed) of my mom's new Nissan Juke 1.6 DIG-T 4WD CVT. It's one of the very first Juke's 1.6 DIG-T 4WD CVT in Poland, especially it is in lovely White Pearl QX1 color :) Gearbox was in Manual mode, Nissan Dynamic Control System in SPORT mode. Hope you enjoy it :) Greetings from Poland :)





Ford Ecoboost Animation
Sticking with the recent trend of 'less is more', Ford has unveiled its new series of EcoBoost 4-cylinder engines at the Frankfurt motor show today.





► Mercedes-AMG Engine Factory
Mercedes-AMG Engine Factory - V8 engine Site Affalterbach ► If you love cars, you should subscribe now to YouCar's channel: http://urlz.fr/lEd Go ahead, it's free! All the Best.





Formula 1 Turbo Engines - The Golden Era [Full Documentary]
Formula One currently uses 1.6 litre four-stroke turbocharged 90 degree V6 reciprocating engines. The power a Formula One engine produces is generated by operating at a very high rotational speed, up to 15,000 revolutions per minute (RPM). This contrasts with road car engines of a similar size which typically operate at less than 6,000 rpm. The basic configuration of a naturally aspirated Formula One engine had not been greatly modified since the 1967 Cosworth DFV and the mean effective pressure had stayed at around 14 bar MEP.[3] Until the mid-1980s Formula One engines were limited to around 12,000 rpm due to the traditional metal valve springs used to close the valves. The speed required to operate the engine valves at a higher RPM called for ever stiffer springs, which increased the power loss to drive the camshaft and the valves to the point where the loss nearly offset the power gain through the increase in rpm. They were replaced by pneumatic valve springs introduced by Renault, which inherently have a rising rate (progressive rate) that allowed them to have extremely high spring rate at larger valve strokes without much increasing the driving power requirements at smaller strokes, thus lowering the overall power loss. Since the 1990s, all Formula One engine manufacturers used pneumatic valve springs with the pressurised air allowing engines to reach speeds of nearly 20,000 rpm. In addition to the use of pneumatic valve springs a Formula One engine's high RPM output has been made possible due to advances in metallurgy and design allowing lighter pistons and connecting rods to withstand the accelerations necessary to attain such high speeds, also by narrowing the connecting rod ends allowing for narrower main bearings. This allows for higher RPM with less bearing-damaging heat build-up. For each stroke, the piston goes from a null speed, to almost two times the mean speed, (approximately 40 m/s) then back to zero. This will occur four times for each of the four strokes in the cycle. Maximum piston acceleration occurs at top dead center and is in the region of 95,000 m/s2, about 10,000 times standard gravity or 10,000 g. In 1966, with sports cars capable of outrunning Formula 1 cars thanks to much larger and more powerful engines, the FIA increased engine capacity to 3.0 L atmospheric and 1.5 L compressed engines. Although a few manufacturers had been clamouring for bigger engines, the transition wasn't smooth and 1966 was a transitional year, with 2.0 L versions of the BRM and Coventry-Climax V8 engines being used by several entrants. The appearance of the standard-produced Cosworth DFV in 1967 made it possible for small manufacturers to join the series with a chassis designed in-house. Compression devices were allowed for the first time since 1960, but it wasn't until 1977 until a company actually had the finance and interest of building one, when Renault debuted their new Gordini V6 turbo at the British Grand Prix at Silverstone that year. It was in 1980 that Renault proved that turbocharging was the way to go in order to stay competitive in Formula One (particularly at high-altitude circuits like Kyalami in South Africa and Interlagos in Brazil) ; this engine had a considerable power advantage against the Ford-Cosworth DFV, Ferrari and Alfa Romeo naturally aspirated engines. Following this, Ferrari introduced their all-new turbocharged engine in 1981. Following these developments, Brabham owner Bernie Ecclestone managed to get BMW to make the team turbocharged inline-4 engines from 1982 onwards. And in 1983, Alfa Romeo made a turbocharged V8 engine, and in the same year and following years, Honda, Porsche (badged as TAG), Ford-Cosworth and other smaller companies made turbo-charged engines, mostly twin-turbocharged V6's. By the midpoint of 1985, every competing team had a turbocharged engine in their car. And by 1986, the power figures were becoming quite crazy- all of the engines had unrestricted turbo Boost in qualifying, where they were developing 1,350+ hp at 5.5 bar Boost (80 psi). These engines and gearboxes would only last about 2-3 laps, and for the race, the turbocharger's Boost was restricted to ensure engine reliability; but the engines still produced 950-1000 hp during the race. Following their experiences at Indianapolis, in 1971 Lotus made a few unsuccessful experiments with a Pratt & Whitney turbine fitted to chassis which had also 4WD. The power range was between 390 hp (290 kW) to 500 hp (370 kW), turbos 500 hp (370 kW) to 900 hp (670 kW) in race, in qualifying up to 1,300 hp (970 kW).





Funcionamiento de un Motor de Combustión
un video demasiado interesante, se puede observar lo que sucede dentro de un motor que muchas veces ni siquiera nos imaginamos... chequenloo les va a gustar ;)





How Car Cooling System Works
Watch the animated video on how the engine cooling system in an automobile works.





Ferrari V12 Engine
Ferrari V12 Engine Assembly. From start to finish, one technician is responsible for the assembly........ For more automotive news: http://www.automotivetv.net/ Follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AutomotiveTv.net





Yamaha YZF R1 crossplane crankshaft technology explained
The crossplane or cross-plane is a crankshaft design for V8 engines with a 90° angle between the cylinder banks. The crossplane crankshaft is the configuration used in most V8 road cars.3d model of a cross-plane crankshaft demonstrating the 90 degree angle between the crank throws and the large counter weights.The crossplane crankshaft has four crankpins, each offset at 90° from the adjacent crankpins. The first and last of the four crank pins are at 180° with respect to each other as are the second and third, with each pair at 90° to the other, so that viewed from the end the crankshaft forms a cross. The crankpins are therefore in two planes crossed at 90°, hence the name crossplane. A crossplane crank may have up to five main bearings, and usually does, as well as large balancing weights. Crossplane V8 engines have uneven firing patterns within each cylinder bank, producing a distinctive burble in the Exhaust note, but an even firing pattern overall. Their second-order balance, owing to the 90° bank angle and 90° throws, means no additional balance shaft is necessary to achieve greater smoothness. Without the 90° bank angle, a balance shaft may be required. The other prominent design for a V8 crankshaft is the flatplane crankshaft, with all crankpins in the same plane and the only offset 180°. Early V8 engines, modern racing engines and some others used or use the flatplane crankshaft, which is similar to that used in a straight four or flat-four engine. Flatplane V8 engines may use any angle between the cylinder banks, with 60° and 90° the most common. They lack the V8 burble and the superior mechanical balance of the crossplane design, but do not require the large crankshaft balancing weights. Inherent balance of the big ends is like a straight four, and modern designs often incorporate a balance shaft for smoothness. But without balance shafts, flatplane designs have the least flywheel effect of any V8s, which allows them to be more free-revving. The crossplane design was first proposed in 1915, and developed by Cadillac and Peerless, both of whom produced flatplane V8s before introducing the crossplane design. Cadillac introduced the first crossplane in 1923, with Peerless following in 1924. Inline-4 engines can also use the crossplane concept. The 2009 Yamaha YZF-R1 motorcycle uses the crossplane crankshaft and, in the absence of the 90° bank angle of the V8, must use a separate balance shaft geared off the crankshaft to eliminate the inherent vibration (a primary rocking couple) found in this type of crank. A crossplane crank has been used in Yamaha's M1 MotoGP racing models in the past. Yamaha claims advances in metal forging technologies make this a practical consumer product.





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