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"How To" polish aluminum by hand (part 1)

Umm... in this video I show you uhhh... how to uhh... hand polish aluminum lol. This is part 1 of 2. The entire process took roughly 4 and a half hours and I watched movies for most of them. Forgive the speech impediment lol.


 


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"How To" polish aluminum by hand (part 2)
Umm... in this video I show you uhhh... how to uhh... hand polish aluminum lol. This is part 2 of 2. The entire process took roughly 4 and a half hours and I watched movies for most of them. Forgive the speech impediment lol.





PART 2 - How to Polish Aluminum - EnglishCustomPolish.com
Part 2 of our DIY video tutorial on polishing aluminum using greasless and greased abrasives. The products and tools used are available on our site englishcustompolish.com





how to polish aluminum engine covers
sand paper: autozone, $10 buffing compound and wheels: harbor freight, $10 I don't usually sound like I've been smoking 2 packs a day for 40 years, but I shot this first thing in the morning.





How To Clean and Polish Aluminum and Alloy Metal Engine Polishing on Café Racers or hot rods
Subscribe for weekly videos: http://www.youtube.com/channel/UC28gtkJP-bK77M5Qyc3Dn7g?sub_confirmation=1 Here is a "how to" on aluminum and alloy metal engine polishing using simple household items and your drill. I'm going to polish my entire café racer cumstom motorcycle engine! Awesome process for your garage builds and hot rod !





Valve Cover Modification and Polishing
Crankcase ventilation in a nutshell: High cylinder pressures are achieved both on the compression and combustion strokes. As gasses are compressed and exploded, the rings do the best they can with extremely close tolerances (and oil) to hold all that pressure in... but some still makes it past the rings. That's called blow-by. Blow-by is why all combustion engines are inefficient by design, and why they have crankcase breather systems. Blow-by contains air, water (humidity), fuel, carbon and nitrogen. You don't really want all that stuff in your oil, as they all contribute to oil viscosity breakdown. A breather system works to extract those gasses from the crankcase so they don't condensate into the oil. It does this by connecting the car's air intake system to the crankcase so that blow-by can be re-burnt and transformed into oxides that the catalytic converter can easily break down. As an engine gets worn, the physical capability of the rings to hold that pressure in is reduced. This results in more blow-by and higher crankcase pressure. High crankcase pressure is bad because it prevents the rings from sealing properly, and can also blow oil seals like valve cover gaskets, front case and rear main seals, etc... as that air tries to escape. This is a fire hazard. Oil burns and it's hard to put out. One of the most common tell-tale signs of high crankcase pressure on a DSM is having to zip-tie your dipstick down. If it's getting blown out, then there's excess pressure pushing it out because it has nowhere to go. Also, on an engine that's holding higher crankcase pressure, that pressure works against your oil pressure, and reduces oil flow to all points in the oil system. The factory DSM crankcase has 2 ventilation systems. Two. One is a PCV system (Positive Crankcase Ventilation), and the other one is just a simple breather. The PCV system is connected to the intake manifold, and the breather is connected to the air intake in front of the turbo (or anywhere on the intake in front of the throttle plate on non-turbo cars). The PCV valve is designed to CLOSE OFF the port between the crankcase and the intake manifold when the engine is under load (Boost). When higher pressure is in the intake than the crankcase, a valve snaps shut preventing you from Boosting your crankcase. When you are at idle/cruise (vacuum), it pops open letting those gasses get vacuumed out of the crankcase. Vacuum. The breather always vents back into the intake pre-turbo or pre-throttle plate. That airway is always open. Neither port on either the PCV or the breather are bigger than 1/4", so as much air as you can fit through a single 1/4" hole when you're under Boost... that's all the blow-by it can extract from the crankcase. That might be fine for an 11 PSI factory car, but when some tweaker wants to flow 30, 40, 50+ pounds of Boost, this is a system which is frequently overlooked and in desperate need of attention. You might as well look at your Boost controller as a blow-by increaser if that makes any sense. You gotta get those gasses out of the crankcase. Crankcase pressure is bad. I'm not going to cover vacuum pumps, venturis or other methods of creating vacuum pressure in the crank case because these advanced techniques are for racing applications with dry-sump oil systems which DSMs do not have from the factory, and few people need. Aside from the rings, only worn valve seals can contribute to high crankcase pressure, and that usually causes increased oil consumption that's visible (oil smoke) on cold starts and as the car rolls into high Boost after long periods of vacuum. Some people have tools that can allow them to change the valve seals without removing the cylinder head (if the rings are known to be good), but that's far more time consuming and less complete of a fix than removing and rebuilding the cylinder head. If the rings and cylinder bores are in bad shape, then it's a waste of money. Someone who's performed compression and leak-down tests has determined which parts are bad already. As far as the rest goes, I bypassed my PCV system entirely. There is no vacuum scavenging of gasses from the crankcase on my car. It eliminates the chance of a PCV valve failing and Boosting my crankcase, and since I have a catch can, excessive blow-by is still being captured through condensation. I installed two 3/8" breather ports which flows more than 8 times the air that the original ones could flow. That should prevent pressure from ever building up. The -8AN fittings are compression fittings that don't require gaskets and are extremely easy to work with. They create an airtight seal to my Greddy catch can which I had modified to accept 2 extra fittings. One is plugged. The other has a 5/8" line to the turbine intake to extract gasses back to the engine like it was originally designed to do.





Aluminum Anodizing Motorcycle Parts
Anodizing Aluminum. A short video showing how I anodize aluminum using the Low Current Density (LCD) method. I did not show all the rinsing steps but the parts do have to be rinsed thoroughly between tanks. http://www.VillainRideCo.com http://www.Facebook.com/VillainRideCo





Tips & Tricks for Polishing / Buffing Stainless Steel Trim Part 3.MPG
Tips and tricks on how to polish & buff stainless steel auto trim.





Dirty jobs How to Polish Aluminum by a Master Detailer - Aluminum Polishing
A video to teach people how to polish aluminum the right way! Here's a link to What I use to do my Polishing. www.dcsupershinestore.com Thanks for watching!





polish aluminum valve covers
let me know what you think. also I do a lot of work on car so if there is something you would like to see i can make a videos on it. I make a lot of " Do It Your Self videos"





Using Marvel Mystery oil to remove Aluminum Oxide and clean up rusty chrome on your motorcycle
I got to messing around with pre-cleaning the sl350 and figured I'd show you how I literally save entire days of polishing





Polishing Aluminum (GSX is alive)
Tools: You need a big one that can run for long periods of time. Air tools are out of the question because the compressors that can keep up with air DIY grinders use the equivalence of 100 60-watt incandescent light bulbs while running. Mine uses that much power and it CAN'T keep up. I like straight-shaft electric tools because they use less power than air tools in order to do more work. They spin faster and generally have more torque. Electric drills don't have the RPMs needed to work efficiently because you need heat from friction for the polishing process. Cordless, fo'getaboutit. Bench grinders have plenty of speed, but don't make enough torque. Most bench polishing equipment is built primarily for production, not detail. If you have to polish large simple pieces, they're fine for that. The goal is to use a tool that is efficient enough on what you're polishing to make this seem less like punishment. Quality tools. Dremels are only good for grinding and sanding tiny detail stuff, but larger industrial DIY grinders with a .25" chuck are what you need. Power tools are only acceptable for polishing. Power sanding equipment doesn't have a random orbit and also doesn't leave a grain to allow you to gauge how deep to go, so you can't achieve a polishable surface by mechanical means. You'll also notice that sandpaper for orbital and belt stuff doesn't go beyond 320 grit and it's expensive. With a power tool you will inevitably leave marks too deep to remove by wet sanding with 220 grit. You will pay for cheating. Removing casting marks or rough cast with a flap wheel is not cheating so long as you remove all of the defects evenly and still thoroughly hand-sand the part afterwards. About Sandpaper: Anything goes below 220 grit so long as it's dry. You have to wet-sand everything higher than 220 grit, so both electric power tools and non-wet-sanding paper are ruled out beyond that point. The best finishes are hand-sanded in the crosshatch method shown in this video. If there are stubborn scratches that your sandpaper won't take out, go to a coarser grit and work your way back. Step up only one increment in grit with every grade of sandpaper available until there are no visible scratches in the surface. Skipping a grit will just mean you have to work 4x as hard to do the same work. So 220, 320, 400, 600, 800, 1000, etc... Depending on what grade of aluminum you're working with, you can sometimes get away with sanding the part only to 600 grit. To get the most out of a shine, you have to go beyond 1000 grit. The farther you go with the sandpaper, the less work it will take to polish and maintain. About Rouge: The black rouge, or emery compound, has an abrasive in it. It's also considered a cutting compound. It removes material and makes easy work of oxidation. Because it has an abrasive it can leave directional swirls in the finish that are visible in some lighting conditions. It's an extremely-coarse polish but in many cases can produce a brilliant shine. Brown rouge is a step between black and white. Though unnecessary if you're using black, brown is less aggressive while still having the ability to remove scratches and defects. You can also polish wood with it. White rouge is ideal for precious metals PLUS aluminum. It removes what a jeweler calls a deep scratch, but what an auto enthusiast may consider invisible. If there's a scratch that the black rouge didn't take out, white rouge won't do it. It will however, bring out the most reflective finish in aluminum that you can achieve mechanically. Jeweler's rouge (red) is not for aluminum. Neither is blue or green. Well... blue is universal supposedly. I haven't ever needed it and don't trust it. About polishing wheels: Polishing wheels come in different textures. For black rouge I use hard or triple-stitched flannel wheels. The more stitching, the harder it is. The soft wheels tend to disintegrate quickly. The harder wheels can contribute to swirl-effects in the finish when they become contaminated. Metal polish: I can't say enough good stuff about cheap-old Blue Magic metal polish. Brightens the best white rouge polish jobs and is really easy to work with. Mothers is good. NEV-R-DULL is an amazing product that lifts and cleans almost anything out of metal. Where to get supplies: You can buy rouge by the pound at truck stops. Lots of great polishing supplies can usually be found anywhere where you'll find the rigs. Ask a trucker. Also there's HarborFreight, Eastwood, PJ Tool & Supply, and lots of others. Everything's within google distance.





How To Polish Aluminum Rims
This is how I polish aluminum rims. I AM NOT A PROFESSIONAL. How did I learn to do this? Just like you are right now-by watching YouTube! Special thanks goes to DC Super Shine for all their videos and demonstrations! www.youtube.com/dcsupershine Rims were originally on the back of a semi truck. The driver traded them in for super singles, so I bought all eight. I polished them for my bus, and the extras I polished to sell. They are available for whoever wants to buy them.





How to clean old motorcycle aluminium parts .KOKKINA FEGARIA TECH





Motorcycle...Polishing aluminum to a chrome like finish
I wanted to chrome polish my frame, swing arm and rims on my 97 yzf600r, but I never polished anything before. I started by polishing a small piece on the bike first and this is how I did it. The end result was pretty nice.. I havn't started the rest yet it, I need a lot more time





Clean your Motorcycle - Part 1
This short clip is taken from the '3x Bike Essentials' DVD available from DrivenandRidden.com.





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