DIY Adjustable Coilover Conversion Part 1

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DIY Adjustable Coilovers Part 2 (final update)
Hey guys, been a while.. thought I'd just show off what happened to that coilover project of mine. Brief overview, nothing special. Part 1 is getting quite a few hits, thought I'd finally make a follow up of it...





How to Make Coil-Over Shocks
Ever thought about installing coil-over shocks on your car? John Edwards @ Costa Mesa R&D Automotive Machine Shop did too, watch as he goes through the steps on how he made his own coil-over shocks. These are going on the Blueberry Fiat 850 Sedan. (949) 631-6376 Don't forget to 'Click' and SUBSCRIBE. Making parts for your car can be dangerous to your health!





BMW E30 Strut Housing Shortening Tutorial + Ground Control Coilover Build
This is a video tutorial on how to properly shorten your E30 front strut housings to allow use of a shorter shock and how to assemble the Ground Control Coilover Conversion kit once the housings are shortened. The work was performed on my 1991 BMW 318is and my setup is as follows: - Ground Control Coilover Conversion Kit - spring rates: 440f/650r - Bilstein HD front shock inserts for a 325ix model E30 - 82-02 Camaro KYB Gas-A-Just shock for the rear (not mentioned in video) This video is just a general outline, your process may vary a bit depending on what tools, parts or coilover setup you use. *Work at your own risk. I am not responsible for any injuries or damaged parts/tools if you decide to follow my tutorial, I am simply providing some helpful tips.* Text from the video: Step 1: Begin by removing both front strut assemblies (not every step is shown in this video) Step 2: Once the strut assembly is out, remove the original top hats, springs and strut inserts. Use a spring compressor to perform this. Work at your own risk. Step 3: Once everything is removed and the strut housing is bare, the next step is to remove the original spring perch. Use your own preferred method to do this. In my case, I used an angle grinder and cutoff wheel. Cut around the top of the weld where the spring perch is welded to the strut housing. Step 4: Now it is time to cut the strut housing. Again, use your own preferred method to do so, just make sure the cut is straight and perfectly perpendicular to the strut tube to ensure that it doesn't have any slight bends or angles when everything is welded up. Otherwise, camber will be affected and the strut insert will not slide into the strut housing. Step 5: Start your first cut just under the weld from the original spring perch. I used a band saw. I made sure everything was level and perpendicular and made my first cut. Step 6: Now that the strut housing is cut into two pieces, it is time to make the second cut. This cut will determine how much you are shortening the strut housing by. Measure from where you just cut towards the top of the housing (threaded section). It is recommended to not cut any more than 2". Make sure you do not cut into the threaded section of the housing. I cut out 2". Note: The next clip shows what your strut housing should look like before and after making both cuts. I accidentally have the middle section flipped, which could cause confusion. This is the section that will be thrown away anyways. Step 7: Now you are ready to weld. Prepare the end areas for welding and use welding magnets to keep everything perfectly positioned. Keep a small gap between the ends for the new metal to fill. The size of the gap should be the same size as the thickness of the metal of the strut housing. Step 8: I would recommend MIG or TIG welding. When MIG welding, incorporate sheilding gas rather than using flux core wire. This will yeild much cleaner welds and better control. If you are ill-equipped or not comfortable with welding, have a professional weld everything up for you. Start off with a few tack welds and then weld the rest together all the way around. Step 8: Once everything is welded up, grind the welds down so they are flush with the rest of the strut housing. I recommend using an angle grinder with flap disk. Step 9: Now it is time to weld on the supplied adjuster perch. Use the threaded spring adjuster sleeve as a guide. Situate it so that the top of the adjuster sleeve is flush with the top of the strut housing as it sits on the perch. Make sure the flat area of the new perch is facing out towards the wheel. Start off by making a few tack welds and then weld the rest. Only weld on the bottom of the perch. Step 10: This is how the strut housings should look once complete. Prep and paint to desired color. Do not leave any bare metal unpainted, it will rust over time. Step 11: Once painted, you are ready to assemble the coilovers. Start off by putting two supplied O-ring's around the top of the strut housing to ensure a snug fit for the adjuster sleeve. Leave roughly a 1" gap between O-ring's. Install threaded adjuster sleeve. Step 12: The next step depends on how much you shortened your housings by and your strut insert choice. You want to be able to tighten the insert down snugly with the collar nut. In my case, I had to make a 1.25" spacer out of metal tubing to achieve this. Step 13: Once the strut insert is in place, install the collar nut and tighten it down. You will either need to buy or make a tool to tighten it. Step 14: Install the spring adjuster followed by the spring itself. Step 15: After the spring is in place, install the supplied top spring plate followed by the original top hat (or whichever top hat you decide to run). Step 16: Double check to make sure everything is tightened to spec. Now your new coilovers are complete and ready to install!





Coil Over Installation: Honda Civic Instructions MOST MODELS!!
Hey guys, Just threw together a video of us dropping this 1997 civic lx on hk5 coilover springs and sleeves we got off of ebay, theyre werent expensive at all, and ride really well. If you like this video, comment like and subscribe and youll have a chance to win free prizes!!




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