Chevrolet Volt Review - Everyday Driver

The guys go commuting in the Chevy Volt. Can it live up to the hype and be competitive against the gas-sipping Pri-i of the world?

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Tesla Model S Driving Review - Everyday Driver / Exotic Driver
The Tesla Model S has captured the interest of nearly everyone and become the most-lauded alternative vehicle available. The guys climb into a loaded P85+ model to see if the S lives up to all the hype, and where it excels. Watch our detailed video on the touch-screen interface here: http://youtu.be/CLg48uvyNS8 For our Model X SUV Review go here: https://youtu.be/YYLJxzDoGmc Lots more on the way - look for us on Thursdays! We read every comment, so subscribe and stay connected for more: Like us: http://Facebook.com/EverydayDriver Follow us: http://Twitter.com/EverydayDriver





2013 Chevrolet Volt Range Extending EV / Plug In Hybrid Review
Join us as we take an in-depth look at General Motors' first plug-in hybrid which they prefer to call an EV with a range extender. We talk infotainment, drivetrain, batteries, charging, hop in the trunk and take it on the road. The Chevrolet Volt may be the most maligned and least understood car on the market. After a week of strange questions and bipolar reactions to GM's plug-in hybrid, I came to a conclusion. GM's marketing of the Volt stinks. By calling the Volt an "Electric Vehicle (EV) with a range extender," a huge segment of the population can't get past "Electric" and immediately cross the Volt off their list. There is also [strangely] a segment of the population that says, "that's great but I want a hybrid." Guess what? The Volt is a hybrid. Before we dive into the Volt, it's important to know how hybrid systems work. GM's Belt-Alternator-Starter, Mercedes' S400 Hybrid and Honda's IMA hybrids are all systems where the engine is always connected and even if the car is capable of "EV" mode, the engine is spinning. Porsche, VW, Infiniti and others use a pancake motor and clutch setup to disconnect the engine from the motor and transmission allowing a "pure EV" mode. Honda's new Accord has a 2-mode setup where the motor drives the wheels via a fixed ratio gearset, the engine drives a motor and above 45MPH a clutch engages, linking the engine and motor together at a ratio of roughly 1:1. Ford, Toyota and the Volt use a planetary gearset "power splitting" device. Yes, the Volt uses a hybrid system that although not identical, is thematically similar to Ford & Toyota's hybrid system. Say what? I thought GM said it was a serial hybrid? Yes, GM did at some point say that and I think that has caused more confusion than anything else about the Volt. The bankrupt Fisker Karma is only a serial hybrid. The engine drives a generator, the generator powers the battery and the motor to move the car forward. At no point can the engine provide any motive power to the wheels except via the electrical connection. The Volt's innovation is that it can operate like a Fisker Karma or like a Prius. It is therefore both a serial and a parallel hybrid. To do this, GM alters the power split device power flow VS the Ford/Toyota design. Then they add a clutch allowing the gasoline engine to be mechanically isolated from the wheels. And finally they add software with a whole new take on a hybrid system. Statistics powered by ChannelMeter http://channelmeter.com





Chevy Volt - 9 Months and 9000 miles with this amazing GM hybrid electric car [Review]
http://www.redferret.net/?p=34759 .The Chevy Volt is charging ahead in the electrifying battle to become the #1 plug in hybrid. OK, so how cheesy an opening is that, but the reality is that for the first time since the horse drawn carriage, gasoline is slowly becoming more of an optional part of the personal transportation equation. At least that's the way it seems right now...gas powered skateboards may change the balance once again if they get popular. But I digress. The Volt isn't the first electric car, nor is it the sportiest (hello Fisker Karma), or the one with furthest range (nice to meet you Tesla Model S), the cheapest, the largest, the shiniest, and it can't make balloon animals. However...it is definitely a landmark vehicle. The Chevy Volt is simply the most practical plug in hybrid ever created, and I am not surprised that it won the European Car of the Year at the Geneva Motor Show this summer (http://www.wired.com/autopia/2012/03/volt-ampera-europe-car-year/). It combines a 35-40 mile electric range with a surprisingly agile internal combustion engine (aka "gas engine"). Of course, electric driving range is just one feature, even a golf cart can stagger a few miles on an electric charge. The Volt however manages to combine plug-in technology and practicality in a fun-to-drive package, and the result is a vehicle which achieves a phenomenal gas mileage while at the same time offering conventional sedan style comfort and style. And what other car comes with not just one, but two smartphone apps to keep you informed and in touch with your vehicle? Most importantly, you don't need to worry about running out of battery charge half way to your destination, as with other electric vehicles. We definitely haven't seen the last of this kind of imaginative and innovative technology. Check out my video review below which bursts quite a number of myth balloons about this brave engineering gamble from General Motors. More at www.redferret.net





Chevy Volt Sub-Zero Start and Drive
Does an electric car even work when it is -12f? Sure! Also a tour of remote start, key fob remote range, and navigation system. Road-tripping in a Volt: http://youtu.be/Fdua40hYdpk




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